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Daily Christian Advocate 



Final Committee on Journal Report 

The Committee on Journal hereby certifies that the following corrections 
are to be made in the official record of the 1992 General Conference: 



p. 706, col. 1, last two lines 
should read as follows: "the peti- 
tion, which was, as I understand 
it, an annual conference peti- 
tion." 

p. 706, col. 2, para. 2, line 3, sub- 
stitute "no" for "so" to read, 
"...is that there is no reluctance 
to reaffirm..." 

p. 707, col. 1, para. 6, should 
read: "We move to consideration 
of Calendar Items from the 
Legislative Committee on Inde- 
pendent Commissions." 

p. 707, col. 1, para. 9, should 
read: "and so the "H" stands for 
Haven, something..." 

p. 708. col. 2, para. 8, 1 believe 
this is Scott Williams. I don't 
have my DCA to locate the an- 
nual conference. He is men- 
tioned by Frank Trotter on page 
709. 

p. 709, col. 2, A delegate spoke 
not just a translator. Who was 
it? What language? Shotdd 
italics be added in? 

p. 710, col. 2, 5 lines from the 
bottom substitute "Sudan" for 
"Sadan" 

p. 710, col. 3, para. 2, Change 
"Students" to "Student" 

p. 711, col. 1, para. 1, line 4 & 5 
should read "Standing Commis- 
sion on Alcohol and Drugs." 

p. 716, col. 3, line 37, add 
"-Pacific" after "California" 

p. 716, col. 3, lines 38 and 39, 
Capitalize "Commission on 



Daily Editions 

Religion and Race." 

p. 718, col. 2, line 9 delete 
"Bishop Talbert" it is still Don 
Klarup speaking 

p. 718, col. 2, line 32 Capitalize 
"Discipline" 

p. 719, col. 1, line 24 "No" vote 
is 339 not 389 

p. 721, col. 3, line 36 substitute 
"DAUGHTERY" for "BEVINS." 

p. 723, col. 1, line 26 should read 
"is against the Constitution of 
the Church..." 

p. 723, col. 2, line 47 should read 
'Vould be eligible to sei-ve as 
council director..." 

p. 723, col. 3, line 2 & 3 change 
"Scout and" to "Scouting" 

p. 723, col. 3, line 5 & 6 change 
"Scout and" to "Scouting" 

p. 723, col. 3, line 6 & 7 change 
"Scout and" to "Scouting" 

p. 724, col. 1, lines 17-21 should 
read "...matters except Constitu- 
tional amendments, election of 
delegates to General of Jurisdic- 
tional Conference, in matters of 
ordination, character and con- 
ference relations." 

p. 730, col. 1, line 25, change 
"stay" to "stand" 

p. 734, col. 2, line 39 and 40 
delete "and abuse" so that it 
reads "in case of neglect or 
abuse." 

p. 738, col. 2, line 32, change 
"listed" to "lifted" 



p. 738, col. 3, line 54 please iden- 
tify the delegate listed as 
"STOVER." I don't have my 
DCA to research it. 

p. 739, col. 3, line 31 "ties"? 
what is the correct word? 

p. 739, col. 3, line 35 substitute 
"or" for "nor." 

p. 740, col. 3, Une 4 substitute 
"covenental" for "covenential" 

p. 743, col. 3, line 6 change 
"consider" to "reconsider." 

p. 744, col. 1, line 17 change "is" 
to "has" 



p. 744, col. 1, line 34 change 
"need" to "have" 

p. 745, col. 3, line 12 change 
"BIOSHOP" to "BISHOP" 

p. 745, col. 3, line 22 capitalize 
World Sei-vice 

p. 745, col. 3, line 23 should read 
"receives some of the largest 
amounts of..." 

p. 746, col. 3, line 50 substitute 
"apportionments" for "appor- 
tions." 

p. 747, col. 2, line 23 change 
"paced" to "paid" 

p. 747, col. 3, line 48 & 49 
Replace "RIDDLE" with BAR- 
BARA W. RIDDLE (Florida): 

p. 748, col. 2, line 13 should 
read, "we have 2 more sessions 
remaining." 

p. 748, cow. 3, last paragraph 
should read: RANDY DAY 



B 



Daily Christian Advocate 



(NEW YORK): Thank you, 
bishop. 

"Out of the ashes, Los Angeles 
began the hard task of rebuild- 
ing its future. The century's 
deadliest riots left deep scars on 
the face of the city and on the 
soul of the nation." 

p. 750, col. 1, line 29 substitute 
"MiUie" for "Milley" 

p. 750, col. 1, hne 59 change 
"goning" to "going" 

p. 750, col. 2, hne 20 change 
"goning" to "going" 

p. 750, col. 2, line 59 "4871" to 
"46-7-1" 

p. 751, col. 1, hne 9 change 
"unconstitutional" to 
"unconstitutional" 

p. 751, col. 1, hne 24 change 
"goning" to "going" 

p. 751, col. 2, lines 29-32 delete 
second subhead Calendar Item 
1518 

p. 754, col. 1, line 22 "DONALD 
W. HAMILTON (Yellowstone): 

p. 754, col. 2, line 3, change 
"that" to "the" 

p. 754, col. 2, lines 9 and 23 is 
"Here, here" correct or is it 
"Hear, hear"? 

p. 754, col. 2, hne 28 "JOSEPH 
H. BULLINGTON (Alabama- 



West Florida): 

p. 745, col. 3, line 46 
"CAROLYN JOHNSON (Noi-th 
Indiana):" 

p. 758, col. 3, line 47 should read 



p. 763, col. 1, line 35 change 
"full" to "fair" 

p. 763, col. 2, line 1 substitute 
'Vhat" for "want" 

p. 768, col. 2, line 21 substitute 
"at" for "a" 

p. 768, col. 3, line 7, after chair- 
person, delete "to have to leave 
that are in the conference for 
bush activity" substitute "that 
had to leave because of busy ac- 
tivity..." 

p. 769, col. 1 - check name- is it 
DELIGHT WIER? 

p. 770. col. hne 5 "CAROLYN 
MARSHALL" instead of 
"CAROLYN WAKOM" 

p. 770, col. last line change 
"Rock" to "Rocky" 

p. 770, col. 2, line 26 add (Dis- 
played t-shirts with "Denver- 
General Conference 1996" on 
them.) 

p. 770, col. 2, delete Ed Paup, 
substitute Sally Geis (Rocky 
Mountain) 

p. 773, col. 3, 4 lines from bot- 
tom change "6500" to "65-0-0" 



p. 778, col. 3, lines 22-26 duphca- 
tion of entry for Bishop Tuell 

p. 779, col. 1, 10 lines from bot- 
tom change "pastor" to "past" 

p. 781, col. 1, 10 hues from bot- 
tom change "REX" to "TEX" 

p. 783, col. 1 after (recess) and 
"BISHOP TUELL...is going to" 

p. 783, col. 2, the ( ) are wrong- 
the bishop spoke before! the ( ) 
are ill-placed throughout the 
last issue and are not accurate! 

p. 784, col. 3, 15 lines from bot- 
tom change "excepting" to 
"accepting" 

p. 785, col. 1, hne 32 delete 
second "for" 

p. 785, col. 3, hne 24 is STAN- 
LEY "DAVID STANLEY (Iowa): 

p. 787, col. 1, hne 25 UNIDEN- 
TIFIED is DAVID STANLEY. 

p. 788, col. 1, Une 22 UNIDEN- 
TIFIED is SEVERE 

p. 790, col. 2 GEIS should read 
SALLY GEIS (Rocky Moun- 
tain): 

KNOWLES should read 
GRADY KNOWLES (Calif- 
Nevada): 

LAWSON should read JAMES 
LAWSON (Calif-Pacific): 

p. 792, col. 1, hne 37 change 
"except" to "exempt" 



Daily Christian Advocate 



Memoirs of Bishops 



Memoirs of bishops who died during the 1989-92 quadrennium are 
included in this journal in accordance with Discipline Par. 611.1. 



Sante Uberto Barbieri 
19021991 

Sante Uberto Barbieri was born in DuevUIe, Italy, on 
August 2, 1902. As a boy he moved to Switzerland, later to 
Germany, and then with his parents to BrazU where he 
attended school. After the death of his father he worked as 
an itinerant jewelry salesman as weD as studying in 
preparation for law school. Sante Uberto Barbieri married 
Odette dc Oliveira, a school teacher, on October 4, 1924. 
She influenced him into joining the Methodist Church and 
becoming a minister. He enrolled in Union Theological 
Seminary in Italy. After graduation he went to the United 
States for advanced degrees at Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity and Emoiy University. 

The Barbieris had four children: Laura, Stelvio, Livio Uber- 
to, and Flavio Ennio. Odette Barbieri, who had been very 
active in the World Federation of Methodist Women, died 
on July 24, 1983. 

Minister of Central Methodist Church in Buenos Aires, 
Argentina, for five years, Sante Uberto became professor 
and then dean of Union Theological Seminaiy. In Januarj' 
1949 the Latin American Central Conference elected him 
to the episcopaq-. He was assigned to the River Plata Area 
that included Argentina, Uruguay, and Bolivia. This same 
year he was elected chairman of the First Latin American 
Evangelical Conference and began an active ecumenical 
involvement, including being one of the presidents of the 
World Council of Churches 1954-61. He has delivered many 
lectures at academic institutions; has published 45 volumes 
of Christian commentaries, poetry, drama and reUgious 
stories in Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, and English; and 
has received many awards and citations. He received the 
1982 "Upper Room Citation" for literary contribution and 
in 1987 a prize in a poetry contest in Caseros, Buenos Aires, 
Argentina 

Officially retired in 1970, Bishop Barbieri continued to 
work in ecumenical groups in Latin America. Between 1970 
and 1978 he was Executive Secretary of the Consejo de 
Inglesias Evangelicas MetodLstas do America Latina. 

Bishop Barbieri died Februar>' 13, 1991. 

Cornelio M. Ferrer 

1908-1988 



both times by Bishop Edwin F. Lee, and became a member 

of the Philippines Annual Conference. 

From 1940 to 1946 Cornelio Ferrer was a District Superin- 
tendent. He was then named a Crusade Scholar and at- 
tcndedDrewUniversity wherehercceivedan M.A. in 1948. 
He returned to the Philippines for a rural pastoral ministry. 
From 1950-68 he worked for the National Council of Chur- 
ches in the Philippines and earned a B.D. from Union 
Theological Seminary in the Philippines. For years he was 
Philippine correspondent of The Christian Century. 

On November 28, 1968, Cornelio M. Ferrer was elected to 
the episcopacy by the Philippines Central Conference and 
served the Manila Area until 1974 when he retired. Since 
1984 he has been a volunteer worker in rural missions, 
visiting farmers and fishermen in their homes, and by the 
riverside where the fishermen mend their nets. Bishop 
Ferrer returned to the rural ministry in 1980 to his former 
Annual Conference (Northwest Philippines) as "bishop-in- 
residence" to Pangapisan, Lingayen, Mangaldan and the 
Central Conference Camp in Cabayaoasan, Bugallon. In 
January 1988 he went to Malasique Methodist Mission in 
the Province of Pagasinan to build a church. 

Bishop Ferrer died November 23, 1988. 



Paul Vernon Galloway 
19041990 



Cornelio M. Ferrer was born in Lingayen, Pangasinan, 
Philippines, on September 16, 1908. He attended Union 
College of Manila, receiving a B.A. degree in 1937, while 
serving student appointments. On February 23, 1935, he 
was ordained deacon and on November 28, 1937, an elder, 



Paul Vernon Galloway was born in Mountain Home, 
Arkansas, on April 5, 1904, the son of James Jesse and Ella 
Burkhead Galloway. He was educated at Hendrix and 
Henderson-Brown Colleges (A.B. 1926), serving as assis- 
tant pastor of First Church in Fort Smith, Arkansas, in 
1925-26. For oneyear he attended Perkins School of Theol- 
ogy and was pastor of the Arkadelphia Circuit. While at- 
tending Yale Divinity School, where he received his B.D. in 
1929, he was associate pastor of the Methodist Church in 
Hamden, Connecticut. 

Paul Galloway was ordained deacon by Bishop Edwin D. 
Mouzon, joined the North Arkansas Conference where he 
was ver\' active, especially in financial matters. In 1931, 
Paul was ordained elder by Bishop Hoyt M. Dobbs. Between 
1933 and 1950 he served churches in Arkansas and did 
post-graduate work at the University of Chicago. In 1950, 
he was appointed to Boston Avenue Church in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

Paul GaUoway was awarded honorary doctorates from 
Arkansas A.M. & N. College, Hendrix College, Oklahoma 
City University, Southern Methodist University, and Mc- 
Murry College, and has been a trustee of many educational 
and civic institutions. Paul was chairman of the Program 



D 



Daily Christian Advocate 



Committee for the General Conferences of 1956 and 1960. 
The South Central Jurisdictional Conference elected Paul 
Vernon Galloway to the cpiscopacj' in 1960 and he was 
assigned to the San Antonio Area where he scived for four 
years; he then was assigned to the Arkansas Area for eight 
years. 

Following this first retirement, he was then assigned to the 
General Board of Disciplcship for one year, preaching 
Evangelistic Missions in several states. In 1973, at the death 
of Bishop Kenneth Copeland, he was assigned to the Hous- 
ton Area for the remaining three yeare and retired again in 
1976. 

Following the death of Bishop Shaiiiblin, Bishop Galloway 
was reactivated in November, 1983 and assigned to the 
Louisiana Area for the balance of the quadrennium. At this 
third retirement, they moved to Arkansas, and in 1981, 
moved to Tulsa. He was Resident Bishop in the Boston 
Avenue United Methodist Church. 

Bishop Galloway died August 4, 1990. 

Walter Kenneth Goodson 
1912-1991 



Son of Daniel Washington and Sarah Peeler Groodson, Ken 
was born on September 25, 1912, in Salisbury, North 
Carolina. He attended Catawba College (A.B. 1934) and 
Duke Divinity School. He was ordained deacon by Bishop 
Paul B. Kern in 1937 and elder by Bishop Clare PurceD in 
1939 and joined the Western North Carolina Annual Con- 
ference. 

Kenneth Goodson was pastor of Centenary Church in 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The Southeastern Juris- 
dictional Conference elected him to the episcopacy in 1964 
an d h e served the Birmingham area for eight years an d then 
the Richmond area for another eight. He retired in 1980. 

Bishop Goodson was president of the Gteneral Board of 
Discipleship 1972-80 and president of the Council of 
Bishops 1976-77. He holds honorary degrees from a nirni- 
ber of academic institutions. 

Bishop Goodson died September 17, 1991. 

James W. Henley 
1901-1990 



James Walton Henley was bom July 14, 1901, son of 
Charles W. Henley and TerressaDowthet Johnston Henley 
of Cleveland, Tenn. He attended the McCaDie School for 
Boys in Chattanooga and entered Emory Universitj' in 
1919. After receiving his B.A. degree, he entered Yale 
Divinity School where he received the B.D. degree in 1926. 

Upon graduating, he joined the Holston Annual Con- 
ference of the Methodist Church, being ordained deacon 
and elder in 1928 and 1930 respectively by Bishop Horace 
M. Dubose. 

Jim served the Spring City circuit (1926-27), Crossville 
(1927-28), Harriman (1928-29) before attending the 
University of Edinburgh (1929-30). Upon returning, he 
served First Church, Morristown (1930-31), Central 



Church, Knoxvillo (1932-37), Centenary Church, Chat- 
tanooga (1937-44) and was transferred to the Tennessee 
Ckjnfcrencc where he ser\'ed West End Church (1944-60). 
At the Southca-storn Jurisdictional Conference in 1960, he 
was elected bishop and was assigned to the Jacksonville 
Area, later called the Florida Area, where he served until 
his retirement in 1972. 

His published works are "Sermons on Our Lord's Prayer", 
and "The Sermon on the Mount." Emory University, 
Lycoming College, Florida Southern College and Bethune 
Cookman College conferred honorary degrees. BLshop 
Henley served on the General Board of Education and the 
Board of Social Concerns. 

On December 31, 1931, James Henley married Huldah Jo 
Chap in. They had two sons: James Walton Henley, Jr. and 
Chap in Henley. Huldah Henley died on October 22, lf)68. 
In 1970, Bishop Henley and Margaret Hollis were married 
in First United Methodist Church, Lakeland, Florida Mar- 
garet died on December 5, 1984. 

After retirement in 1972, the Herd cys were associated with 
Educational Opportunities, a program of Christian educa- 
tion travel in the Holy Land and the countries of Europe. 

Bishop Henley died June 7, 1990. 



Francis E. Kearns 
1905-1992 



Francis Kearns was born December 9, 1905, in Bentlej'\iUe, 
Pennsylvania, the son of George V. and Jennie Mae Mc- 
Qear>' Kearns. He joined the Pittsburgh Conference in 
1927 after he graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University. 
He then attended Boston University School of Theology, 
receiving his S.T.B. in 1930. He was awarded the Jacob 
Sleeper Fellowship for graduate studies that he took at the 
University of Berlin and the University of Edinburgh. He 
completed his Ph.D. at the University ofPittsburgh in 1939. 
He received an honorarj' D.D. from Ohio Wesleyan and has 
received several other honorary degrees from other institu- 
tions. 

FVancis Kearns was ordained a deacon by Bishop W. F. 
MacDoweU in 1930, and elder by BLshop Herbert Welch in 
1931. He had pastorates in Dravosburg, Pittsburgh, and 
Uniontown in Pennsylvania, and in Wauwatosa, Wiscon- 
sin. He was chairperson of the Board of Education of the 
East Wisconsin Conference, and fortwelveyears a member 
of the General Board of Education. He was also active in 
ecumenical affairs, and three times a delegate to the World 
Methodist Conference. He was elected a delegate to the 
(General Conferences of 1952, 1956, and 1964. 

His election to the episcopacy was by the North Central 
Jurisdictional Conference in 1964. He served twelve years 
in the Ohio East Area. Bishop Kearns has served as trustee 
of several academic institutions. He is the author of The 
Church is Mine andThe Spiritual Message of the Hebrews. 
He retired in 1976. For twelve years after retirement, he 
was Visiting Professor of Church Administration at the 
Methodist Theological School in Ohio. 

Bishop Kearns died January 29, 1992. 



Daily Christian Advocate 



John Wesley Lord 
1902-1989 



The son of John James and Catherine Carmichael Lord, 
John Wesley was born in Patcrson, New Jei>sey, on August 
23, 1902. He was graduated from Montclair State Normal 
School in 1922 and was a teacher/principal in the New 
Jersey schools for two years. Wes then went to Dickinson 
College, receiving a B.A. degree in 1927. While serving as 
assistant pastor at Emory Methodist Church in Jersey City, 
he attended Drew Theological School, receiving his B.D. in 
1930. Wes Lord matriculated for his Ph.D. at the University 
of Edinburgh and later did graduate work at Rutgers 
University in the fidd of education. 

John Wesley Lord was ordained deacon by Bishop Mc- 
Conndl and elder by Bishop Lowe and joined the Newark 
Conference in full connection in 1931. He was appointed to 
the Community Church in Union, New Jersey, where he 
sen'ed for three years while the church was erected by 
volunteer labor. Subsequently, he was appointed to First 
Church in Arlington and First Church in Westfield, both in 
New Jersey. 

At the Northeastern Jurisdictional Conference of 1948, 
John Wesley Lord was elected to the episcpoacy and as- 
signed to the Boston Area where he served for twelve years 
and then to the Washington Area for twelve more years 
before retirement in 1972. Bishop Lord held many positions 
of leadership in general agencies of The United Methodist 
Church as well as ecumenical agencies, particularly the U. 
S. InterreUgious Committee on Peace, as well as trustee of 
many instituti ms. He was president of the Council of 
Bishops 1970-71. He has been honored by doctorates from 
Dickinson College, Boston University, Morgan State Col- 
lege, Western Maryland College, Delaware State College, 
and Mnntdair State CoDege. 

Bishop Lord died June 26, 1989. 

Torney Otto Nail, Jr. 
1900-1989 



T. Otto Nail was born in Tcrre Haute, Indiana, on May 23, 
1900. While a student at Hamline University, from which 
he was graduated in 1921, and the University of Minnesota, 
he served the church at Medford, Minnesota. WhUe a stu- 
dent at Garrett Biblical Institute he began his position as 
assistant editor of The Epworth Herald and was ordained 
deacon by Bishop Charles Edward Locke. On the comple- 
tion of his seminaiy work he was ordained elder, also by 
Bishop Locke, and joined the Minnesota Annual Con- 
ference in 1924. 

T. Otto Nail had a long career associated with T/ieC/iW.sftan 
Advocates; representative at Cincinnati Editorial Board 
(1935-39); editor, Northwestern and Central Editions 
(1939-40); managing editor (1941-48); acting editor (1948- 
49); editor (1949-56); editor, The New Christian Advocate 
(1956-60). He is also the author of a dozen books for youth 
and took graduate studies at the Medill School of Jour- 
nalism and the University' of Chicago. For 38 years, 1922- 
1960, he worked for The Methodist Publishing House. 



In July 1960, T. Otto Nail was dected to the episcopacy by 
the North Central Jurisdictional Conference. He served 
eight years in the Minnesota Area. During 19()8-72 he 
continued in active service in order to administer the Hong 
Kong-Taiwan Area, preparing the conferences in both 
regions for autonomy— self-directing, self-propagating, and 
self-supporting Methodist groups. After retirement Bishop 
NaU, with wife Frances, wrote five books. 

Bishop Nail died Februaiy 21, 1989. 

William Kenneth Pope 
1901-1989 



Hale, Missouri, is the birthplace of W. Kenneth Pope. He 
was born on November 21, 1901, the son of William Mum- 
ford and Victoria LaRue Pope. Kenneth attended Claren- 
don College and then Southern Methodist University from 
which he holds BA.. and B.D. degrees. In 1924 he became 
pastor of the church In MUford, Texas, and in 1925 was 
ordained deacon by Bishop James E. Dickey. He did two 
years at Yale University Graduate School, was ordained 
dder by Bishop John M. Moore, joined the Central Texas 
Annual Conference and was appointed to First Church, 
Breckenridge, Texas. Helater served thefoUowingappoint- 
ments: First Church, Georgetown, Texas (1933-36); St. 
Paul, Sprmgfidd, Missouri (1936-40); First Church, Austin, 
Texas (1940-49); and First Church, Houston, Texas (1949- 
60). Kenneth Pope was active in conference affairs 
wherever he went, serving in many leadership positions. He 
was elected to the General Conferences of 1952-60. He was 
a member of the General Board of Education 1952-60, 
served as secretary of the Commission to Study the Mmistr}' 
1949-56, and wrote many artides for church publications. 
In 1960, the South Central Jurisdictional Conference 
dected W. Kenneth Pope to the episcopacy. He served the 
Arkansas Area for a quadrennium and then the Dallas-Fort 
Worth Area until his retirement in 1972. His honorary 
degrees indude those from Southwestern University, 
Hendrix College and Southern Methodist University. He 
has been a trustee of numerous institutions. 

Bishop Pope died June 26, 1989. 

Paul Arthur Washburn 
1911-1989 

Paul was born in Aurora, IDinois, on March 31, 1911, son 
of Eliot Arthur and Lena Buhmsen Washburn. After being 
graduated from high school in his home town, Paul was a 
teller and bookkeeper In a bank for three years. He then 
attended North Ck;ntml College, receiving a B.A. in 1936; 
during his last two years of college Paul served the Eppards 
Point Evangelical Church in Pontiac, Illinois; he continued 
here while he attended Evangelical Theological Seminary 
(B.D. 1938). 

Ordained both deacon and elder by Bishop George Edward 
Epp, Paul Washburn participated in the union between the 
Evangelical and the United Brethren Churches, serving 
churches in Rockford (State Street Evangelical/St. John's 
E.U.B.-1939-52) and Naperville (First E.U.B.-1952-62)- 
both in Illinois. He then became executive secretary of the 



Daily Christian Advocate 



Commission on Church Union. 

Paul A. Washburn was the first bishop of The United 
Methodist Church, being consecrated in Dallas on April 22, 
1968. He was assigned to the Minnesota Area for fourycars 
and then administered the Chicago Area for eight years 
until retirement in 1980. He is the author of The United 
Methodist Primer and An Unfinished Church. 
Bishop Washburn has been a tmstcc of numerous institu- 
tions, holds several honorary degrees, and was president of 
the General Board of Global Ministries 1972-76. 

Bishop Washburn died May 6, 1989. 

William McFerrin Stone 
1913-1988 

William McFerrin Stowe, son of John Joel and Myra Ander- 
son McFerrin Stowe, was born in Franklin, Tennessee, on 
Januarj' 28, 19 13. He received an A.B. from Hendrix CoDege 
in 1932. a B.D. from Duke Divinity School in 1935, and a 
Ph.D. from Boston University in 1938. 
Mac Stowe was ordained deacon in 1937 by Bishop DuBose 
and elder by Bishop A, Frank Smith in 1942. He served 
pastorates in Alt; Loma, Te.xas (1938-40); Garden Villas 
Church, Houston (1940-44); and thenjoined the staff of the 
General Board of Education where he served until 1949 
when appointed to First Church, Stillwater, Oklahoma. A 
popular preacher, Dr. Stowe was at various times visiting 
professor and special lecturer at Diff School of Theology, 
Scarritt College, Boston University School of Theology, 
Perkins School of Theology, Westminster Theological 
Seminar^-, Graduate School of Religion at the University of 
California, Gammon School of Theology. He was also active 
in Oklahoma Conference programs as well as trustee of 
numerous institutions. He was a delegate to the General 
Conferences of 1956-64. 

In 1951 Mac Stowe moved to St. Luke's Church in Ok- 
lahoma City where he was pastor at the time of his election 
to the episcopacj' in 1964 by the South Central Jurisdiction- 
al Conference. Bishop Stowe was assigned to the Kansas 
Area 1964-72 and the Dallas/Fort Worth Area 1972-80 at 
which time he retired. He was Bishop-in-residence at 
Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity, 1980-88. 

Bishop Stowe has been very active in the World Methodist 
Council, most recently chairing the Program Committee 
for the 1981 Conference in Hawaii Bishop Stowe was 
chosen by his colleagues to give the Episcopal Address at 
the 1980 General Conference. He is holder of numerous 
honorary degrees and other honors He is the author otThe 



Characteristics of Jesus, The Power of Paul, It All Began 
with God, and If I Were a Pastor. 

Bishop Stone died November 24, 1988. 



Friedrich Wunderlich 
1896-1990 



Friedrich was born in Plauen, Saxony, Germany, on 
January 23, 1896, son of Engdbert and Lydia Laemmlc 
Wunderlich. He was named after his paternal grandfather, 
the founder of the Methodist Church in eastern (Jermany. 
Friedrich served with the German army in 1915-18 as he 
did later in 1940-45. 

Friedrich received a Ph.D. from Leipzig University in 1923, 
was ordained by Bishop J. L.Nuelsen, and became secretary 
of Christian education in the Methodist Church in Ger- 
many. After seven yccu-s in this capacity. Dr. Wunderlich 
was appointed pastor of a church in the densely populated 
part of Hamburg known as "little Moscow". 

On December 6, 1930, Friedrich Wunderlich and Maria 
Straube were married. They had four children: Maria (Mrs. 
Emanuele Mannarino), Gertraud (Mrs. Wolfgang Weber), 
Greorg-all who became medical doctors-and Friedrich, 
doctor of oceanography. Maria Wunderlich died on 
Februarys, 1980. 

In 1939 Dr. Wunderlich became Professor of Theology at 
the Predigerseminar der Methodistenkirke in Frankfurt- 
am-Mainandin 1948thePresidentof the seminary. During 
theseyears. Dr. Wunderlich was active in the World Council 
of Churches and other ecumenical organizations. 

In 1953 the Central Conference in Germany elected Dr. 
Wunderlich as bishop for the Methodist Church in Eastern 
and Western Germany that he administered for fifteen 
yesu-s until his retirement in 1968. On the death of Bishop 
Odd Hagen in 170 Bishop Wunderlich was recalled to active 
service and supervised the Stockholm Area until the elec- 
tion of Bishop Borgen. From 1970-72 he was the repre- 
sentative of the World Methodist Council in the Geneva 
Office. 

Bishop Wunderlich holds honorary degrees from DePauw 
University, Birmingham-Southern College, and Baldwin- 
Wallace College. He is the author ot Methodists Linldng 
Two Continents, Gott Gibt Sein Volk Nicht Auf and Chris- 
tus vorAllem. Friedrich Wunderlich ein Brucltenbauer Got- 
tes [God's bridge builder] is a 1982 biography written by 
Karl Heinz Voigt. 

Bishop Wunderlich died July 9, 1990. 



Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Tuesday, May 5th, 1992 



Vol. 4 No. 1 



Delegates Will Handle 2,433 Proposals 



General Conference delegates will deal with 2,433 
proposals sent by 9,500 individuals, groups churches or 
agencies. And, if computers function properly, these pe- 
titions should be processed in record speed. 

In spite of the fact there are 228 fewer petitions than 
last quadrennium, and in spite of speedier processes, in- 
cluding automatic tallying of votes and computerized 
petition preparation, veteran delegates still expect the 
comparatively leisurely debates and processes of the 
first week will be followed by hurried consideration and 
parliamentary shortcuts in the second week. 



Most Popular Topics 

Most petitioners want to make some change in the 
Book of Discipline, and paragraphs receiving the most 
attention are paras. 71, 906 and 402. 







Agenda 






Tuesday, May 5 


8:30 


a.m. 


Calendar Com. Organizes 
Orientation of delegates from 
Outside the U.S.A. 


9:00 


a.m. 


Training of Marshalls and Pages 


9:15 


a.m. 


Correlation and Editorial Revision 
Com. Orginizes 


9:30 


a.m. 


Presiding Officers Com. Organizes 
Courtesies and Privileges 
Committee Organizes 


9:45 


a.m. 


Credentials Com. Organizes 
Com. of Journal Organizes 


10:30 


a.m. 


Joint Training Session of Agenda, 
Calendar, Presiding Officers & 
Editorial Revision Com. 


1:30 


p.m. 


Holy Communion 


2:45 


p.m. 


Organization of the Conference 


4:30 


p.m. 


Organization of Legislative Com. 


7:45 


p.m. 


Hymn Sing 


8:15 


p.m. 


Episcopal Address; Bishop 

C. Dale White, New York Area 



The Ministry Committee will field the highest num- 
ber of petetions (546), followed by the General/Judicial 
Administration Committee (312). ^ 

All Petitions Printed 

Delegates may find their work a little easier this 
year as they will be able to read the essence of all peti- 
tions in two advsmced editions of the Daily Christian 
Advocate (DCA). In past conferences only a portion of 
the petitions was printed; the remaining petitions were 
read to the legislative committees. 

Delegates are reminded, however, that only the es- 
sence of the petitions are printed. Rationale for re- 
quested changes are not printed as explanations are 
frequently lengthy and sometime include appended in- 
formation from other sources. However, each legislative 
committee will, as always, deal with the original peti- 
tion. 

The decision to print all petitions, including those 
from local churches and individuals is the result of ac- 
tion by the 1988 General Conference requesting copies 
of all petitions to be given to every member of a legisla- 
tive committee dealing with the items. 

As the Commission on General Conference wrestled 
with the possibility of providing over 100 members of 
various committees with thousands of sheets of paper, 
they foresaw a nightmare of loose papers and an expen- 
sive copying bill. Commission members concluded that 
it would be less expensive and more helpful to put out a 
sepeirate volume of the DCA with edited petitions from 
individuals, local churches, and groups. 

All petitions are now treated in the same manner; 
rationales are deleted from requests to change the Dis- 
cipline, and reasons for requesting resolutions are ab- 
breviated. 



(continued Page 3) 



May 5, 1992 





Commonwealth of Kentucky 

Office of the Governor 



Brereton c Jones 
Governor 



GREETINGS: 



The Capitol 

700 Capital Avemue 

Frankfort d0601 

(502I 564-261 1 



Louisville and the Commonwealth of Kentucky take pride in welcoming the 1992 
General Conference of the United Methodist Church. 

We trust you will find our meeting facilities and hospitality so expansive that you may 
never want to meet anywhere else. 

Commonwealth Convention Center, where you are meeting, contains 200,000 square 
feet and is within walking distance of 3,000 of the city's 10,000 hotel and motel rooms. 

You will find Louisville just right — large enough to offer the best in cultural and 
entertainment advantages, yet small enough to make you feel cozy and comfortable 
because everything you want is conveniently located. And our skyline is highlighted by 
many beautiful churches. 

We want to do all we can to please you, partly because we have a reputation to uphold 
— Louisville ranks in the top 10 cities in America in convention and trade show 
attendance. 

Our Administration is placing strong emphasis on strengthening the family unit though 
improved education and children and family services. We depend on strong support from 
our churches in this regard. Your presence is an added boost to this effort. 

Kentuckians are also pleased that the Presbyterian Church. (U.S.A.) has chosen 
Louisville as the consolidated site for its national headquarters. This has contributed to 
the high moral tone as well as the revitalized economy of Louisville's downtown area. 

It is a joy to receive you and the glad tidings you bring with you. 

With best regards, I arj 

Sincerely, 

Brereton C. Jones 




AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H 



Daily Christian Advocate 



Daily Christian Advocate is published in several advance 
and daily editions, except Sunday, during sessions of the 
1992 General Conference of The United Methodist Church by 
The United Methodist Publishing House, P.O. Box 801, Nash- 
ville, TN 37202. 

Staff 

J. Richard Peck Editor 

Keith Kendall Associate Editor 

Richard Street Composition Editor 



How General 
Conference Works 

Greneral Conference convenes 
every four years and is the top pol- 
icy-making body of The United 
Methodist Church. The Discipline 
states that no person or organiza- 
tion except the General Confer- 
ence "has authority to spesik 
officially" for the denomination 
(Paragraph 610). 

Meeting sites for General Con- 
ference are rotated among the 
church's five jurisdictions in the 
United States. The 1984 General 
Conference was in Baltimore, 
Maryland, and in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, in 1988. The 1996 General 
Conference will meet in Denver, 
Colorado. 

Each annual conference is enti- 
tled to a minimum of two delegates. 
Beyond that minimum, the number 
of delegates per conference is deter- 
mined by the number of lay and 
clergy members within that confer- 
ence. Of the U.S. delegations, Vir- 
ginia is the largest with thirty-two 
members. The largest Central Con- 
ference delegation is Central Zaire, 
with twelve members. Eight voting 
delegates represent Methodist 
churches that are related to The 
United Methodist Church through 
concordats. For more information 
on delegates and delegations, see 
page 10. 

Members of the Council of Bish- 
ops attend General Conference but 
do not vote and cannot speak with- 
out permission from the delegates. 
A bishop presides at each plenary 
session. Each member of the Coun- 
cil of Bishops usually serves during 
one morning, afternoon, or evening 
session. All bishops — active and re- 
tired — attend the entire conference. 

General Conferences have sev- 
eral purposes. One is to revise The 
Book of Discipline, the book of 
church law for The United Method- 
ist Church. General Conferences 
also adopt statements of "Social 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



Principles" and resolutions on vari- 
ous current moral, social, public pol- 
icy, and economic issues. Approving 
plans and budgets for church wide 
programs for the next four years 
also occupies General Conference 
time and energy. 

Primary sources of legislation for 
the General Conference are peti- 
tions and proposals from church 
agencies and organizations. Any in- 
dividual member or official body 
within The United Methodist 
Church can submit a petition for 
legislative action. 

All petitions are printed in the 
Advance Daily Christian Advocate. 
The Advance DCA also lists the 
eleven 1992 legislative committees, 
which receive, approve, amend, 
combine, or disapprove petitions for 
recommendation to the full body of 
General Conference. 






The United Methodist Ghuhcii 

LOUlSvtlLC AREA 

PROFESSIONAL TOWERS SUITE 2SA 

40I0 DURONT CIRCLE 

Louisville, Kentucky .loaoy 



HoDRMT 11 Spain 




Dear Dclegales and Friends of the 1992 General Conference of the United 
Methodist Church, 

Welcome to Louisville and to the Louisville Annual Conference We have 
been planning for your visit and arc anxiously awaiting your arrival Hundreds of 
our people serving on more than 40 committees are working lo make your time 
here a pleasant and rewarding experience As the host Conference, we want lo 
care for your every need. We want you to also know th.-il our people are praving 
regularly for each of you by name. What you do here could impact the entire 
world for Jesus Christ. You honor us by meeting in our Conference 

It will be apparent when you arrive in Kentucky thai the Commonwealth 
is celebrating its Bi-Ccnlcnnial. We arc 200 years old and take much pride in our 
remarkable history. Before Kentucky was an "official" slate, however. Francis 
Asbury had already established preaching places throughout this region. Many of 
our United Methodist Churches have already celebrated Ihcii Bi-Ccntennial, and 
others arc near. Kentucky was a fertile soil for the gospel that came across the 
mountains, and the people here have continued in their deep commitment to the 
Christian faith. Your visit with us will be another mile-stone in the church history 
of this region. 

The General Church has met in Louisville before. The history of the 
General Conferences meeting here reveal that they have never been just 
"maintenance" gathering. (The marker in front of the Convention Center where we 
will be meeting will attest to this.) It is our fervent hope and prayer that this will 
be the time in Louisville when the Church moves out in unity and might lo 
address the spiritual needs of the world. 



Welcome to Louisville! 



SiflEerely, 
Robert H Spain 



(proposals from page 1) 



New System for 
Processing Legislation 



As delegates start to work on these petitions tomor- 
row, they will find a new operating system in place. 

In previous years, a legislative committee would: 1) 
act on petitions; 2) send them to a typing pool; 3) check, 
sign and send the typed copies to a calendar secretary 
who would organize them and assign calendar mem- 
bers. Copy would finally be sent to the DCA where it 
would be typeset. 

This year, a recorder will be present in every legisla- 
tive committee. Recorders will have all the petitions in 
their computers, and they will input the legislation as it 
is passed by the committee. 



Committee officers will subsequently receive a copy 
of the proposals exactly as they will appear in the DCA. 
Committee officers will then check DCA copy instead of 
a typewritten copy. *■ 

As a result, there should be fewer keystrokes, in- 
creased processing speed, and greater accuracy. Com- 
mittee officers will be trained in the new process 
meetings this evening at 6 p.m. 



May 5, 1992 





DAVID L. ARMSTRONG 

County JuOge'E'ecuiwe 



JEFFERSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY 
OFFICE OF THE COUNTY JUDGE/EXECUTIVE 



May 3, 1992 



Jeflereon Coonfy 

Counhouse 

Lousvite. KY 40202 

(502)62&«161 



To Our Honored Guests: 

Greetings to the United Methodist Church General Conference. 
It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to Jefferson County, 
and extend every courtesy to you and your families. 

I hope that your convention is fruitful and that your stay 
in our county is long remembered for the hospitalities we offer. 
You will find that our community combines modern conveniences 
with traditional amenities, blending the best of the past and 
present. 

If my office can offer any assistance to you during your 
stay, please do not hesitate to call on us. We are always ready 
to make new friends in Jefferson County. 

Sincerely, 



-ry^ 




David L. Armstrcya^- — 

Jefferson County Judge/Executive 



An EquaJ Opportunrlv Employe' 



Announcements 

Announcements made orally or 
by projection are restricted to the of- 
ficial operation of the General Con- 
ference and its legislative and 
administrative committees. Other 
announcements by groups (no indi- 
vidual messages) can be taken to 
the DC A office (Room 116) by 3:00 
p.m. on the day before the an- 
nouncement is to be printed in the 
DCA. 

Special Needs 

Persons requiring wheelchairs or 
special transportation to hotels may 
contact the Information Booth in 
the lobby of the Convention Center. 

Sections of the hall have been set 
aside for persons with handicapping 
conditions. Marshals will be pleased 
to direct those requiring such seat- 
ing to the appropriate sections. 



Everyday Details 



Mail Today 



Interpretation 
Equipment 

Foreign-language receivers may 
be checked out fi"om the local com- 
mittee in the Show Office off the 
North Lobby of the Convention 
Center. 

Lost & Found 

Lost and Found is located in the 
Information Booth in the lobby of 
the Convention Center. 



Do you need to mail a letter or 
buy some stamps? For your conven- 
ience, a post office is located in the 
ticket office off the North Lobby of 
the Convention Center. It will be 
open Monday through Friday fi-om 
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Messages 

There is a bulletin board located 
next to the Information Center in 
the lobby of the Convention Center. 
Messages wiU be posted on this bul- 
letin board. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



Food Service 

Cafeteria food service for dele- 
gates and visitors will be available 
each day (except Sunday, May 11) 
in Hall C of the Convention Center. 

Continental breakfast wiU be 
served from 7:30 a.m. until 11:00 
a.m. Sweet rolls, doughnuts, juices, 
fresh fruit, and beverages will be 
available. 

Lunch will be served trom 11:00 
a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Hot entree, cold 
sandwiches, and assorted salads 
will be available. 

In addition, concession stands 
will be open at various times dur- 
ing the conference to serve the con- 
ference attendees. 

Emergency Information 

The First Aid Room in the Con- 
vention Center is located off the 
North Lobby. It is open each day 
from 8:30 a.m. until closing in the 
evenings. The First Aid Room is 
staffed by a registered nurse and a 
qualified physician who are volun- 
teers from Louisville United Meth- 
odist churches. After hours, persons 
with medical needs may call Dr. C. 
Kenneth Peters, family physician, 
at 481-0809. For after-hour medical 
emergencies call 911 and ask for 
transportation to the Methodist 
Evangelical Hospital emergency 
room, located in the heart of the 
city near the hotels where delegates 
and visitors are housed. 




JERRV E ABRAMSON 



di>^<t 

City of Louis\'iIle 

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR 

801 W Jefferson Street ■ Louisville KY 40202-2728 

(502) 62S 3061 



May 3, 1992 



To All in Attendance 

United Methodist Church General Conference 



Dear Friends: 

As Mayor of Louisville, 1 take great pleasure in 
welcoming you to Louisville. We are very proud to serve as 
host city for the United Methodist Church General Conference 
and extend to you our finest in Kentucky hospitality. 

While you are visiting, I encourage you to experience 
some of the many sites and pleasures that make Louisville a 
great American city. You can cruise the Ohio River on 
Louisville's historic steamboat, the Belle of Louisville or 
enjoy lunch or dinner on a floating restaurant. Our downtown 
is a blend of historic buildings and exciting new 
architecture. I invite you to experience the IMAX (maximum 
image) theatre at the Museum of History and Science located on 
historic West Main Street. Another action film can be found 
at the Kentucky Derby Musei-jn at Churchill Downs, where you can 
watch your favorite Kentucky Derby race! And be sure and 
catch a ride on the vintage-style Toonerville II Trolley 
located along famous Fourth Avenue. Don't forget to 
experience the Louisville Zoo! 

Once again, a warm welcome to Louisville. > We are glad 
you are here and hope you Mirrr\visit us of$^n. /' 

incerely/ 



Looking for thing* to do in Louisville? This giraffe is among the 
more than 900 animals at the Louisville Zoo. For information on 
more things to see and do in and around Louisrille, see page* 
21-24. 




May 5, 1992 



Instructions for Expense Reimbursement 



The chairperson of each delegation received an 
envelope containing travel expense vouchers for each 
member of the delegation today. 

Please read carefully the instructions related to al- 
lowable expenses as shown on the reverse side of the 
travel expense voucher. Any questions should be di- 
rected to the treasurer's office in the Conference Room 
on the mezzanine level. 

Have these travel-expense vouchers completed 
promptly and returned to the chairperson of the delega- 
tion for approval. The chairperson should deliver all ap- 
proved vouchers in the delivery envelope to the 
treasurer's office by Wednesday May 6, before the eve- 
ning session begins. The travel expense checks, in ac- 
cordance with approved travel expense vouchers, will 
be delivered to the chairperson of each annual confer- 
ence delegation on Friday, May 8. 



Check Cashing 

All checks issued for travel expense or per-diem ex- 
pense will be written on Liberty National Bank and can 
be cashed at the bank with proper identification. Upon 
receiving approval in the treasvu-er's office, delegates' 
and reserve delegates' personal checks up to $100.00 
may be cashed at Liberty National Bank. The bank is 
open Monday - Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. and Fri- 
day 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. The bank is located at 416 
West Jefferson across the street firom the Convention 
Center. Information concerning the cashing of travel, 
per-diem expense, or personal checks is available in the 
treasurer's office, Conference Room, mezzanine level. 



Per-Diem Vouchers Available May 11 

Per-diem expense vouchers will be distributed to the 
chairperson of each delegation on Monday, May 11. The 
chairperson should deliver all approved vouchers in the 
delivery envelope to the treasurer's office by Wednes- 
day, May 13, 10:00 a.m. Checks for per-diem expense, in 
accordance with approved per-diem expense-vouchers, 
will be delivered to the chairperson of each delegation 
by Friday, May 15, before the close of the conference. 



Badges Identify Groups 

You can identify many of the people at General Conference by the colors 
of their badges. 

» White & Red: Delegates 
White & Light Blue: United Methodist bishops 
White & Purple: Judicial Council 

White & Dark Blue: Commission on the General Conference 
White & Green: General secretaries of boards and agencies 
Blue & Dark Blue: Local committee 
Canary & Red: Marshals and pages 
Green & Dark Green: Reserve delegates 

Buff& Brown: General Council on Finance and Administration 
Pink & Dark Blue: Staff of general boards and agencies 
Ivory & Brown: Ecumenical representatives 
Ivory & Light Blue: Spouses of bishops 
Ivory & Purple: Spouses of Judicial Council 

Ivory & Dark Blue: Spouses of Commission on the General Conference 
Sand & Brown: News media 



Episcopal and Lay 



Addresses Available 



on Audio or Videotape. 



Order at Booth 



in the UM 



Publishing House 



Display 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



Bishop C. Dale White to Dehver Episcopal Address 



Dr. C. Dale White, bishop of the New York Area, 
will deliver the traditional "State of the Church" epis- 
copal address this evening at 8:16 p.m. 

Prior to his election as bishop, Bishop White was a 
district superintendent in the Southern New England 
Conference from 1971 to 1976. He served as director of 
program for the denomination's Division of Temperance 
and General Welfare of the General Board of Christian 
Social Concerns, headquartered in Washington, DC, 
from 1961 to 1965. He then became associate general 
secretary of that agency (now Church and Society) and 
served until 1968. 

Bishop White served as pastor at Calvary Methodist 
Church in Newport, Rhode Island (1948-1951); Hing- 
ham Methodist Church, in Hingham, Massachusetts 
(1951-1954); Stoughton Methodist Church in Stoughton, 
Massachusetts (1954-1961); and East Greenwich United 
Methodist Church in East Greenwich, Rhode Island 
(1968-1971). 

Bishop White left the general church agency staff 
and returned to the local church (1968) because he be- 
lieved the local church to be "a vital action center for 
the Christian gospel." Bishop White noted that it didn't 
take long working at the national level to realize that 
the credibility of one's Christian witness on national 
legislative issues depended upon authentic social and 
ethical witness at the local church level, as well as on 
"an informed, alert, and open grassroots constituency." 

Bishop White was consecrated a bishop in 1976 in 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. He served the New Jersey 
Area for eight years. In July, 1984 he was assigned to 
the New York Area. 

Bishop White received his BA. degree from UM-af- 



the local church is 

**a vital action center 

for the Christian gospeV 



filiated Momingside College in Sioux City, Iowa. He 
earned his S.T.B. and Ph.D. degrees irova Boston Uni- 
versity. 

Bishop White has published over 150 articles, pam- 
phlets, and curriculum units. He has written primarily 
on issues that bring together insights from the fields of 
ethics, psychology, and theology. He was editor of Dia- 




BUhop C. Dale White of the New York episcopal area will preaent 
the episcopal address this evening at 8:16 p.ni. 

logue in Medicine and Theology (Abingdon, 1968), and 
for seven years, he wrote a column called 'Teens" in 
the denomination's magazines Together and United 
Methodist Today. 

Bishop White has traveled throughout Eastern 
Europe and the former Soviet Union. In the 1960s, he 
was a delegate to the United Nation's Population Con- 
ference in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. He was a lecturer at 
the 1967 International Church and Society Conference 
in Freudenstadt, Germany. He was also a delegate to 
the 1972 and 1976 General Conferences. Among his 
honors, he received the Distinguished Alumnus Award 
firom Boston University. 

Bishop White is a member of the General Board of 
Global Ministries, the national board of Bread for the 
World, and the board of Religion in American Life. He 
also serves on the boards of trustees of Morristown Col- 
lege, Drew University, and Brooklyn Methodist Hospi- 
tal. 

In 1985, Bishop White served on a bishops' hearing 
panel in Washington, DC, on "The Nuclear Crisis and 
the Pursuit of Peace." In 1986, he co-authored a pas- 
toral letter of the United Methodist Council of Bishops 
entitled, "In Defense of Creation: The Nuclear Crisis 
and a Just Peace." 

Bishop White was bom in Sac City, Iowa. He and his 
wife, Gwendolyn Ruth, have six children. 

— Thomas J. Tozer 



May 5, 1992 



Daily Worship Services to Include Guest Choirs 



Each day during the General Conference worship 
services will highlight morning and afternoon hours. 
Beginning on Wednesday, May 6, each guest choir wiU 
sing gathering music at 8:15 a.m. before the 8:30 morn- 
ing worship service. Members of the Council of Bishops 
will be preaching during these services. Afternoon wor- 



ship, in the sanctuary of Trinity United Methodist 
Church, south of the Convention Center on Third 
Street, will feature messages by selected United Meth- 
odist Pastors beginning at 2:30 p.m. following a pre- 
service concert by the day's guest choir at 2:00 p.m. 
These schedule for these services is as follows: 



Tuesday, May 5 

1:00 p.m. Concert: Chancel Choir, First UMC, Dallas, Texas 
Ronald Kauffmann, Director 

1:30 pjn. Holy Commuxiion and Memorial Service 

Preacher: Bishop Emilio J. M. de Carvalho of Angola 
Liturgist: Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel 

7:30 p.m. Pre-service music by First UMC, Dallas 

7:45 p jn. Hymn Sing featuring a service of Methodist 
hymnody 

Wednesday, May 6 

8:16 a.m Concert: Choir of Apache, Oklahoma UMC 
Ms. Penny J. Perry, Director 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Louis W. Schowengerdt 
Liturgists: Dr. William Hutchinson and Reverend Jo 
Carr 

2:00 p.m. Concert: Choir of Apache, Oklahoma UMC 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Dr. Manfred W. Marquardt-Reutlingen, 

West Germany 

Liturgist: Dr. Erika Welti, Zurich, Switzerland 

Thursday, May 7 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Celebration Ringers, St. James UMC, 
Little, Rock eind Junaluska '91 Ringers from the 
Fellowship of United Methodists in Worship, Music 
and the Other Arts. G. Felix Thompson, Director 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Felton E. May 
Liturgist: Phyllis Elizabeth May 

2:00 pjn. Pre-Service Concert: Junaluska '91 Ringers 

2:30 pjn. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Reverend J. Jeannette' Cooper, Newark, 

Ohio 

Liturgist: Don W. Mendenhall, Des Moines, Iowa 

Friday, May 8 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Spirit Wind, Northwest Texas Conference 
Youth Choir 
Bert Bostic and Jon Johnson, Directors 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Ernest A. Fitzgerald 

Liturgist: Reverend D. Randall Williamson, Atljuita, 

Georgia 

2:00 p.m. Pre-Service Concert - Spirit Wind Youth Choir 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Dr. Peter D. Weaver, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 

Liturgist: Mrs. Shirley Parris, Brooklyn, New York 



Saturday, May 9 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Sanctuary Choir, Shepherd of the Hills 
UMC, Sim City West, Arizona. 
John Dorch, Director 8 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Ruediger R. Minor 
Liturgist: Edward Puslecki, Warsaw, Poland 

2:00 p.m. Pre-Service Concert: Shepherd of the Hills Choir 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Reverend Kirbyjon Caldwell, Houston, 

Texas 

Liturgist: W. E. (Buddy) Arnold, North Little Rock, 

Arkansas 

Monday, May 11 

8:15 a jn. Concert: Philander Smith College Choir, Little 
Rock, Arkansas 
Stephen Hayes, Director 

8:30 ajn. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Elias Galvan 

2:00 p.m. Pre-Service Concert: Philander Smith Choir 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Reverend Barbara E. Harper, Birmingham, 

Alabama 

Litxu-gist: Rachel Dickson Cheek, Athens, Tennessee 



Tuesday, May 12 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Credo - Young Adult Choir, Tallin, 
Estonia 8 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship - Ecumenical Service 

Preacher: Bishop Vinton R. Anderson, AME Church 

2:00 p.m. Pre^ervice Concert: Estonian Young Adult Choir 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Reverend Mark Trotter, Sjm Diego, 

California 

Liturgist: Lois C. Seifert, Claremont, California 

Wednesday, May 13 

8:15 a.m. Concert: Sister Spirit, Clergywomen's Quartet 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Melvin G. T^llbert 

Liturgist: Reverend Peter Chen, San Jose, California 

2:00 p.m. Pre-Service Concert: Sister Spirit 

2:30 p.m. Afternoon WorshipP U UP 

Preacher: Reverend Joseph Chrispin Renner, Sierra 

Leone, West Africa 

Liturgist: Doris J. Rudy, Evemston, Illinois 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



Thursday, May 14 

8:16 ajn. Concert: Chancel Choir, First UMC, Pittsburg, 
Kansas 
Susan Marchant, Director 

8:30 ajn. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Sharon Brown Christopher 

2:00 p jn. Pre^ervice Concert: First UMC Choir, Pittsburg, 
Kansas 

2:30 p jn. Afternoon Worship 

Preacher: Dr. Jerome King Del Pino, Winchester, 



Massachusetts 

Liturgist: Mrs. Barbara Jantz, Diincan, Oklahoma 

Friday, May 15 

8:16 ajn. Concert: Chancel Choir, St. Paul UMC, Louisville, 
Kentucky 
Michael Beattie, Director 

8:30 a.m. Morning Worship 

Preacher: Bishop Edsel A. Ammons 

10:00 p.mClosing Worship Service (Convention Center) 
Liturgist: Bishop Thomas Bangura 



Dallas Choir to Lead Opening Service 




The 100-member Chancel Choir of First United Methodist Church, Dallas, will be leading the two opening day General Conference 
•ervioes. Their pre-servloe concert begins at 1:00 p.m. They will also sing at 7:80 p.m. this evening before the 7:46 Hymn Sing. 



Leading the opening day worship services is the 
Chancel Choir of First United Methodist Church, Dal- 
las, Texas. The Music and Arts Ministry of First 
United Methodist Church, Dallas, is blessed by aboun- 
dant and diverse talents shared by over 360 partici- 
pants. The Chancel Choir is the core of the church's 
Music and Arts Ministries which includes a graded chil- 
drens choir program, handbell choirs, recitals, plays, 
the Kesheth Dancers, and many other programs. They 
present over 100 anthems, a large-scale musical, sea- 
sonal concerts £ind three m^or works annually. They 
have sung under the leadership of some of the world's 
most dynamic conductors including John Rutter, Lloyd 
Pfautsch, Jane Marshall, and Dave Brubeck. The choir 
is under the direction of Ronald E. Kauffmann, Director 
of Music and Arts Ministries. Mr. KaufEinan, a native 
of Elkhart, Indiana, received his undergraduate degree 
from the University of Evnasville and his Master of 



Music degree from Southern Methodist University. 
Kauf&nann is a member of ASCAP, the Amercian Cho- 
ral Directors Association, the AGEHR, and the Fellow- 
ship of United Methodists in Worship, Music and the 
Other Arts and has over 80 choral, insturmental and 
handbell compositions in print and contributed brass 
arrangements to the United Methodist HymnaL Eliza- 
beth Soderstrom, Organist, has served this congrega- 
tion since 1949. In over forty years of service she has 
made four senior pastors look good and has trained five 
directors of Music. She also plays for many other musi- 
cal events in the Dallas area. Rebecca Gruber, also a 
graduate of Southern Methodist University is the Asso- 
ciate Director of Music Ministries. Richard Owen, As- 
sistant Organist, is currently a candidate for the 
Master of Sacred Music Program at Southern Methodist 
University where he studies with Robert Anderson. 



10 



May 5, 1992 



A Profile of the 1992 General Conference Delegates 



A total of 998 delegates were elected to attend this 
session. Eight hundred and eighty-two delegates come 
from conferences in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The Cen- 
tral Conferences (Africa, Europe, and the Philippines) 
sent 108 delegates. Eight delegates have come from 
other autonomous Methodist churches (churches with 
which The United Methodist Church has formal ties 
through concordats) in Great Britain, the Caribbean 
and the Americas, and Mexico. 

The gain in delegates from the Central Conferences 
(outside the U.S.) reflects a relative increase in the per- 
centage of United Methodists in those conferences. 
Church membership outside the U.S. and Puerto Rico 
increased to more than one million, while the U.S. total 
dipped to about 8.9 million. 

Women make up 30.3 percent of the total 998-mem- 
ber General Conference delegation. Women make up 
34.4 percent (303) of the total U.S. and Puerto Rico dele- 
gation, an increase from 33.5 percent in 1988. Al- 
though there is a slight decrease of women lay 
delegates (from 52 percent in 1988 to 50.3 percent in 
1992), the present percentage of women clergy dele- 
gates (18.4 percent) increased significantly over the last 
fovu- years (15.1 percent in 1988) and has more than 
doubled over the last eight years (8.9 percent in 1984). 
The drop in the number of laywomen elected cut the 
overall gain in women delegates to about 1 percent 
above 1988. Even with the decline, however, women 
outnumber men among the lay delegates by 0.3 percent. 

Fifteen of the 72 U.S. conference delegations will be 
headed by women in 1992. Southwest Texas and West- 
em North Carolina delegations elected women first in 
both lay and clergy delegations. The Western New York 
lay delegation is comprised totally of women. 

The number of racial/ethnic delegates elected in- 
creased slightly more than 1 percent from 1988. Ra- 
cial/ethnic delegates make up 17.9 percent of the 1992 
total, up from 16.7 percent in 1988. A breakdown of 
delegates by racial/ethnic background shows: Cauca- 
sian, 82.1 percent (724 delegates); African- American, 
12.6 percent (111 delegates); Asiem-Americem, 2.7 per- 
cent (24 delegates); and Native American, 0.9 percent (8 
delegates). In what is believed to be a first, the Oregon- 
Idaho Conference elected a Native American woman, 
Carol CoUey, to head its delegation. 

A breakdown by jurisdiction revesds: Southeastern, 
270 delegates or 30.6 percent of the total, with 27.8 per- 
cent being women; North Central, 196 delegates or 22.2 
percent of the tot£il delegation, with 38.3 percent being 



women; Northeastern, 176 delegates or 20 percent of 
the total, with 41.5 percent being women; South Cen- 
tral, 172 delegates or 19.5 percent of the total, with 27.9 
percent being women; and Western, 68 delegates or 7.7 
percent of the total, with the highest proportion of 
women delegates at 47.1 percent. 

Approximately 210 of the 441 clergy delegates and 
225 lay delegates elected for 1992 were not 1988 dele- 
gates. The number of new clergy delegates is slightly 
lower and the number of new lay delegates is slightly 
higher than in 1988. 

The longest-serving lay delegate in LouisviUe wUl be 
Red Bond of the Memphis Conference, first elected in 
1960. John M. Thomas of the South Indiana Conference 
was a delegate first in 1964. 

Among clergy, Charles A. Sayre of the Southern 
New Jersey Conference was elected in 1964. Even 
though he is retired, Sayre is the delegate head at this 
1992 legislative gathering. 

Retired Bishop Nolan B. Harmon, 99, of Atlanta, 
holds the longest current attendance record at General 
Conference, beginning with the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, in 1930 as a delegate from Virginia. 

Conference officials will need to check closely to 
make sure that one bishop and his brother are seated 
correctly. Bishop Thomas B. Stockton (Richmond Area) 
and his identical twin, Richard, a member of the West> 
em North Carolina lay delegation, will be in atten- 
dance. Brothers Bishop William B. Oden (Louisiana 
Area) and Tal Oden, a lay delegate from the Oklahoma 
Conference, will also be present. 

Pastors John Hamish (Detroit Conference) and 
James Harnish (Florida Conference) are a second set of 
twins bound for Louisville. Both also served in 1988. 

At least three clergy-spouse combinations — Warren 
and Mary Ebinger (Baltimore Conference), Robert and 
Elizabeth Sweet (Southern New England Conference), 
and Eugene and Emily Ann Zimmerman (Florida Con- 
ference) — will attend. 

The average-size delegation from the United States 
and Puerto Rico is six clergy and six laity. The Virginia 
Conference will have the largest, 32, with the West 
Ohio Conference next with 30, and the Western North 
Carolina and Florida conferences with 28 delegates 
each. 

Central Zaire will have the largest delegation from 
the Central Conferences with 12 members. 

— Thomas J. Tozer 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



11 



Ruby Galloway Parish to Deliver Laity Address 



"Serving God in Our Private Lives and Public Re- 
sponsibilities — Connecting Faith and Action" will be 
the theme for tomorrow's Laity Address. Ruby Gallo- 
way Parish will present the address at 9:00 a.m. at the 
convention center. 

A resident of Tulsa, Oklahoma, Parish brings a 
wealth of experiences to her presentation. She has been 
a member of The United Methodist Church since she 
was nine years old in "wondei-ful Delight, Arkansas." 
She is active in her local church, Boston Avenue, as an 
adult Sunday school teacher, member of the worship 
commission, and co-chair for Christian Personhood in 
United Methodist Women. 

Parish connects her faith with action in many ways 
in the community of Tulsa. She serves as a board mem- 
ber of United Methodist Cooperative Ministries, an 
agency working to reduce the number of persons becom- 
ing homeless in Tulsa County. 

In 1972 Parish's husband came home from his work 
as a medical doctor and told her about the death of a 
baby girl whose mother had battered her against the 
wall. In response, Parish called together twenty-two 
people to study the problem of child abuse. Por five 
months they did research, held workshops, and explored 
ways to start a program to help parents who were "los- 
ing their cool with their kids." Prom those beginnings 
grew the Parent Child Center of Tulsa, now a United 
Way organization with thirty-one professional staff and 
many volunteers. The center offers education, medical 
care through family support clinics, daycare and foster 
care, and counseling and support services for the treat- 
ment and prevention of child abuse. Parish continues to 
volunteer at the center as a facilitator for a Life Skills 
group for parents. 

Por the past twelve years, Parish has served as a Lis- 
tener at Resonance, a women's growth center in Tulsa. 
During listening sessions, she offers a one-on-one car- 
ing, nurturing presence for women to explore, reorder, 
£md regain confidence in their lives. Parish has also 
conducted workshops on spiritual growth and has 
served as a moderator for the American Institute of Dis- 
cussion. 

Parish has been a certified mediator with the Tulsa 
Municip^^ Court system's Early Settlement program. In 
her work as a mediator for formal, out-of-court hear- 
ings, she meets with parties who come together for face- 
to-face negotiations. 




Ruby Galloway Fariah of Tulsa, Oklahoma, will present the laity 
address Wednesday morning at 9:00 a.m. 

A police chaplain since 1986 with the Tulsa Police 
Department, Parish offers pastoral care to police per- 
sonnel and community members in crisis. Chaplain 
Parish carries a police radio in order to respond to calls 
at the scenes of accidents, suicides, crisis interventions, 
dead-on-arrival situations, and disasters. She has been 
involved particularly with families in which no church 
or community support systems exist. 

The path to presenting the Laity Address began for 
Parish last year. Her manuscript was among 284 manu- 
scripts submitted. Porty-six manuscripts were then se- 
lected for a second screening by a ten-member 
committee. Pour finalists made oral presentations in 
February to the annual meeting of the National Asso- 
ciation of Annual Conference Lay Leaders. Three 
judges selected Parish fix)m among the finalists. 

Parish is married to Joseph Key Parish, a retired 
medical doctor. They have three children: Kent, a medi- 
cal doctor; Karen, a clergyperson; and Jessica, a cler- 
gyperson. 



—Keith H. Kendall 



12 



May 5. 1992 



Women's Role Controversial 100 Years Ago 



A hundred years ago, the question of whether 
women could officially represent predecessor bodies of 
The United Methodist Church was an issue as contro- 
versial as the homosexuality debate today. 

At its 1892 General Conference, the Methodist Prot- 
estant Church — smallest of the Methodist bodies — ar- 
gued for two days over whether four women elected as 
delegates by their conferences should be seated. 

Complicating the issue was that one woman, 
Eugenia St. John of Kansas, had been ordained an elder 
by her conference in 1889, despite the fact that clergy- 
women lacked of&cial recognition. 

But, as St. John herself pointed out during General 
Conference debate, "The great question of the future is 
whether you will have the power to conquer the forces 
of sin, and 1 tell you it will need every woman that can 
be found to stand side by side with the good-minded 
men In this work if the church is to be triumphant." 

In the end, St. John and the other women were tri- 
umphant too. With a vote of 77-48, Conference dele- 
gates decided to seat them — the first time women were 
so recognized by a United Methodist predecessor de- 
nomination. This General Conference also voted to re- 
move the word obey fi-om a woman's marriage vow. 

Their United Brethren sisters were soon to follow. Of 
the 52 lay delegates seated for the first time at the 1893 
United Brethren in Christ General Conference, two 
were women. They gained strength quickly, with 24 
women delegates in 1905. 

Evangelical women, however, were not seated until 
the time of merger with the United Brethren in 1946. 

According to a paper on "Laity Rights jmd Leader- 
ship" by William T. Noll, published in Women in New 
Worlds: Historical Perspectives on the Weskyan Tradi- 
tions, the Women's Foreign Missionary Society (WFMS) 
was key to the Methodist Protestant women's success. 
All four of the women seated as delegates in 1892 had 
been active in the society. St. John was a founder of the 
Kansas branch. Melissa M. Bonnet, a returned mission- 
ary firom Japan, had organized local chapters in West 
Virginia. Mrs. M.J. Morgan was an organizer and offi- 
cer of the Indiana branch of the WFMS. A.E. Murphy 
was treasurer of the Iowa Conference board of missions. 

WFMS was formed in 1879 and cooperated with the 
Methodist Protestant Church Board of Missions to send 
its first missionary, Harriet Brittan, to Japan in 1880. 
The General Conference that same year confirmed the 
society's independent status. 

But, according to Noll, "the tensions developing over 
Methodist Protestant women's new self-assertion and 
competence burst loose at the 1884 General Confer- 



Women Delegates Today 

Women represent 34.4 percent of the delegates at 
the 1992 General Conference. 

Barbara Campbell, an assistant general secretary 
with the Women's Division of the Board of Global 
Ministries, pointed out that, particularly with clergy- 
women delegates, "the growth in the past ten or 
twelve years is really astronomical." 

However, Cecelia Long, general secretariat mem- 
ber of the church's Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women, noted that the 1992 women's delega- 
tion is not at the same percentage level as the de- 
nomination's approximately 60 percent women 
membership figures. "There is work to do to bring 
women into full and equal participation as delegates 
to the General Conference," she said. 



ence." Because the women had no voice, they were un- 
able to stop new rules being forced upon them. 

The women had learned their political lesson. They 
had their full rights restored by the 1888 Genereil Con- 
ference. 

The larger Methodist Episcopal Church — split into 
North and South — also had successful women's mission- 
ary groups. But the northern church refused to seat 
four women elected as delegates to the 1888 General 
conference. Laywomen were officially recognized in 
1906. 

Women did not gain that recognition in the southern 
branch until 1922. 

— Linda Bloom 



General Conference 

audio and video 

resources available 

at sales booth 

intheUM 

Publishing House 

display 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



13 



No Halos in 1792: 200 Years Later 



This year, 1992 marks the 200th anniversary of Gen- 
eral Conference. The first get-together (clergy only, 
mind you) — happened on November 1-15, 1792, in Balti- 
more. It was attended by ambitious, divisive, strong- 
willed, even tyrannical church leaders. 

Episcopal or Legislative 

Within a fledgling denomination, the first General 
Conference was a showdown of sorts between rival cler- 
gymen — a playing field for a church leadership tug-of- 
war. 

In his essay, "Crisis of Leadership: The General Con- 
ference of 1792," Frederick A. Norwood writes that 
Methodists, for the first time, were forced "to deal legis- 
latively with the person£il tension between episcopal 
and parliamentary authority" — a tension that remains 
part of Methodism today. 

Much of that tension surely was felt in the shoulders 
and back of Francis Asbury. The first American "bish- 
ops" — a term John Wesley opposed — of this yoimg 
American church, Asbuiy's halo was no straighter than 
those of his feisty colleagues. Some viewed him as ty- 
rannical. Others sensed that he lacked the acumen of 
an administrator and felt compelled (perhaps called) to 
test his leadership mettle. Imagine Asbury 's thankless 
task: to head a preachers' conference with literally no 
rules or constitution to keep the bishop's or conference's 
actions in check. 

Why a General Conference? 

Why a General Conference — that was Asbury's ques- 
tion. He did not appreciate the apparent groundswell of 
support for a General Conference. Many clergy, how- 
ever, felt a growing instability in the American church 
less than a decade old. 

The annual conference system, launched in 1773 
when the church was merely a movement of "societies," 
was becoming unwieldy and fi'agmented. The fear was 
that without an overall structure, conferences would do 
their own thing out of self-interest and survival. Even 
Bishop Thomas Coke pushed for a General Conference. 
Sent to America fi-om England by Wesley, Coke was 
suspicious of Asbury's leadership style and ability. 

The movement for a larger organization was gather- 
ing momentum. When Wesley died on March 2, 1791, 
their symbol of leadership, conunitment, and cohesive- 
ness died too. The need for unity was indisputable. 



Those First Sessions 

A motion made at the first General Conference 
would limit the power of the bishop, an action directiy 
targeted at Asbury. Following heated debate, the mo- 
tion was voted down. After less than a week, the Rev. 
James O'Kelly and like-minded colleagues became the 
first official members to walk out of a General Confer- 
ence. 

However, the wheels were in motion. The General 
Conference turned attention to enacting church legisla- 
tion. The 1792 conference marked the beginning of an 
unbroken succession of quadrennial meetings on the 
state of the church. It became a quadrennial body an- 
swerable to the people caUed Methodists. Several dec- 
ades passed, however, before lay delegates were 
included in (general Conference. And it was another 
100 years before women were admitted. 

The 1792 General Conference did not solve the 
chvurch's tensions any more than the 1992 session will 
lay to rest all our church's differences today. However, 
General Conference has become an arena in which 
those tensions can be acted out, modified, lessened, and 
redefined. General Conference created order out of con- 
fusion. Its authority touches the highest church officials 
as well as local church members. In its role as maker, 
interpreter, and executor of church law. General Con- 
ference now represents the whole church and helps so- 
lidify the church as a whole. Rich in diversity, rich in 
wholeness — may God bless our diversity and wholeness. 



— Thomas J. Tozer 



Corrections and 
Additions To Volume I 



Page 3: Registration Monday 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. (not 4 
p.m.) 

Page 6: Change Misa o uii Ai -e a to Louisville Confer- 
ence 

Page 399: Copy in middle of second column following 
copy in strike out, beginning "(iv) or (v)" and conclud- 
ing "the equivalent of the applicable Plan Compen- 
sation," should be in bold as proposed new copy. 



14 



May 5, 1992 



The Beginnings of United Methodism in Kentucky 



— Charles W. Brockwell, Jr. 

The sun shone bright on the old Kentucky homes of 
the Clarks, Durhams, and Mastersons. The Methodist 
movement began in Kentucky with such dedicated lay- 
persons. 

Francis Clark organized several Methodist societies 
in homes near Danville in 1783. A local preacher from 
Virginia, Clark was one of many Virginians who came 
to the "southwest" — as they called the Kentucky area. 

Richard Masterson's family organized a Methodist 
class in 1784 in their log home northwest of Lexington. 
In 1788 the Mastersons built another house, which is 
traditionally recognized as the first Methodist meeting 
house in Kentucky. 

Bright Beginnings 

At the challenge of these families. Bishop Francis 
Asbury appointed James Haw and Benjamin Ogden as 
missionaries to the Kentucky District in 1786. At the 
end of one year's labor they reported ninety members 
and the district was divided into two circuits. A third 
circuit was added in 1788. Asbm^ himself presided at 
Masterson's Station over the first Methodist conference 
in Kentucky in 1790. 

The General Conference of The Methodist Episcopal 
Church in 1812 divided the Western Conference into 
the Ohio and Tennessee Annual Conferences. This ac- 
tion split Kentucky roughly in half. The 1820 General 
Conference set up the state as a separate conference, ex- 
cluding the region west of Kentucky Lake and the Ten- 
nessee River. Today this excluded area of Kentucky is 
part of the Memphis Annual Conference. 

Forerunners of the churches of the Evangelical Asso- 
ciation and the United Brethren in Christ were present 
in Kentucky as early as 1780. About that time a Ger- 
man Reformed minister, the Rev. Benedict Schwope 
(Schwab), lived near Lexington. He may have helped or- 
ganize a German church there in 1792. 

A United Brethren church was organized around 
1811 in Louisville. The Evangelical Association organ- 
ized a Sunday school here in 1864 — today's Zion United 
Methodist Church is the direct continuation of that 
work. 

These churches and their successors, the Evangelical 
United Brethren Chvirch and The United Methodist 
Church, have continued vital ministry in eastern Ken- 
tucky's Bell County region. Among the mountains and 
valleys of this Red Bird Missionary Conference, United 



Methodist congregations have ministered to the needs 
of the area's people. 

African Methodist Episcopal work was brought to 
Kentucky about 1838. A Kentucky conference was 
formed in 1868. Quinn Chapel African Methodist Epis- 
copal Church in Louisville is the parent church in the 
state. 

The Kentucky conference of the African Methodist 
Episcopal Church, Zion was organized in 1866. Broad- 
way Temple Church in Louisville is the oldest African 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Zion in the state. 

Brown Memorial Church in Louisville is considered 
the parent church for the Christian Methodist Episco- 
pal Church. The Kentucky conference of the Christian 
Methodist Episcopal Church was established in 1868. 

Dark Days Too 

Kentucky found itself in the middle of divisions in 
the churches of the people called Methodist. The nvmi- 
ber of Methodist people in Kentucky declined in the 
years after the schism led by the Rev. James O'Kelly in 
1792. He split over the issue of episcopal authority, 
even taking the first Kentucky circuit rider, James 
Haw, with him. The appearance in 1800 of the camp 
meeting movement, however, gave the Methodists in 
Kentucky new life, increasing tenfold the number of 
Western Conference members. 

The largest single break in American Methodist 
unity came at the troubled General Conference of 1844. 
Unable to agree on whether or not Bishop James 0. An- 
drew should be allowed to exercise the episcopal office 
so long as he owned slaves, the delegates drew up an 
amicable Plan of Separation. The Kentucky Conference 
declared for the South. 

In May, 1845 the Louisville Convention met at 
Fourth Street Methodist Episcopal Church. The dele- 
gates inaugurated the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. The delegates of this conference divided the Ken- 
tucky conference and established the Louisville Annual 
Conference. 

This Fourth Street chvirch stood on land now occu- 
pied by the Commonwealth Convention Center — where 
we're meeting in 1992! You'll find the location marked 
by a United Methodist Historic Shrine and a Kentucky 
state historical marker. 

The Sun Shines Still 

Just as the great division of Methodism was com- 
pleted in Louisville in 1845, so the first steps toward 
reconciliation were taken in the city at the General 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



16 



Conference of 1874. Work begun there culminated in 
the 1939 tinification of the Methodist Episcopal; Meth- 
odist Episcopal, South; and Methodist Protestant 
Churches into The Methodist Church. Thus, Louisville 
witnessed nugor steps in both Methodist schism and 
reconciliation. You wiU want to see the Methodist Uni- 
fication Window in the east transept of St. Paul UMC 
Church. 

Kentucky Methodism is relatively small in numbers 
but has nurtured a number of denominational leaders. 
Ten United Methodist bishops have come out of Ken- 
tucky: Henry B. Bascom, Hubbard H. Kavanaugh, John 
J. Tigert, H.C. Morrison, Hiram Boaz, U.V.W. Darling- 
ton, John N. Moore, Roy H. Short, Edward L. Tullis, 
and William W. Dew Jr. American Methodism's first 



systematic theologian, Thomas N. Ralston, also came 
firom Kentucky. 

The first Christian Methodist Episcopal bishop, Wil- 
liam H. Miles, was a Kentuckian, as was Bishop James 
Lee Cummings. Afi-ican Methodist Episcopal theolo- 
gian and canonist. Bishop Edward W. Lampton, also 
was firom the state. 

Notable public leaders arising fi-om the Methodist 
movement in Kentucky include governors James Dixon 
Black, Ned Breathitt, and John Larue Helm. U.S. sena- 
tors Alben W. Barkley, who also served as vice presi- 
dent, and Walter "Dee" Huddleston came out of 
Kentucky Methodism. 

— Robert Lear contributed information for this history. 



Old Maitenon's (tation ha* been traditionally reoo^ized a« the 
first Methodiit meeting house in Kentucky. This photo was talien 
after the Methodists moved out. 




The oamp meeting movement gave Kentucky Methodism new life. The movement 
took place around the turn of the century — the nineteenth century, that is. 



Bishop James Osgood Andrew owned slaves in 1844. The delegates 
couldnt agree on whether to allow him to exercise his episcopal office 
and own slaves at the same time. 



16 



May 5, 1992 



Louisville United Methodism Today 



'Touisville is a city with great religious vigor and di- 
versity," says Dr. Roy Webster, district superintendent 
of the Louisville District. "United Methodism seeks to 
lift up a strong Wesleyan witness as we strive to meet 
the religious needs of a socially, economically, and eth- 
nically diverse people. Together we are making signifi- 
cant steps toward the challenge." 

The Louisville District has ail of the opportunities 
and challenges facing urban districts across the church. 
Five of the conferences's eleven larger churches (mem- 
bership of 1,000 or more) are in the district. Seven of the 
thirteen radal/ethnic local churches in the conference 
are located in Jefferson Coimty (six Black congregations 
and one Korean). 

Churches across the district are being challenged to 
reexamine their mission and plan creatively for the fu- 
ture as the chvu-ch moves into the next century. 

Louisville District 
Organized in 1991 

Louisville and Jefferson County comprise the largest 
urban center in the state of Kentucky and in the Louis- 
ville Conference. Historically, the area has often been 
divided into two districts. In 1991, however, Bishop 
Robert H. Spain designated Jefferson County as a sin- 
gle metropolitan region, united in a Louisville District. 
The district includes 51 churches with 22,596 members. 
Dr. Roy L. Webster currently serves as district superin- 
tendent. 

The district is using the district conference as a uni- 
fying representative body for its city and county congre- 
gations. In addition to its district stewards and district 
council on ministries, the LouisviUe District Conference 
of 1991 chartered the Louisville United Methodist Mis- 
sion Coordinating Council. 

A United Methodist urban ministry consultant vis- 
ited Loxiisville in January, 1992, and began to assist the 
mission council in discerning the problems of and poten- 
tijil for evangelization in the district. Based on findings 
fix>m this study, the council wiU bring to the 1992 Dis- 
trict Conference a metropolitan mission strategy and 
plan for the decade. A special mission endowment fund. 
Anchors of Hope, with a goal of $1,000,000 has been es- 
tablished to underwrite urban mission. 

At present the mission council gives support and 
guidance to three urban projects. Portland United Meth- 
odist Center serves children and youth in the city's poor 
Portland area. The new Korean language congregation 
currently meets in the facilities of St. Paul Church. 



The third project. Youth Works, is a creative program 
of volunteers working with first-time juvenile offenders 
referred by the courts. It began in 1989 as a joint minis- 
try of the Calvary East (now Genesis) Black congrega- 
tion and St. Paul UMC with funding fi-om a grant from 
the Human Relations Simday offering fi-om the General 
Board of Chxirch and Society (GBCS). The program has 
been developed as a model by GBCS and the two 
churches to address the needs of youth in trouble. The 
program recruits volunteer mentors to work one-on-one 
with youth referred by the courts to guide the youth in 
making restitution as ordered by the court and to be- 
fi-iend them as they set new goals for their lives. 

There is one cooperative parish ministry in the dis- 
trict. The South Louisville Parish involves five small 
churches in the Churchill Downs area of South Louis- 
ville. 

Louisville United Methodism ministers in an ecu- 
menical environment in Jefferson County. The district 
participates in the Kentuckiana Interfaith Community, 
a network of Jewish and Christian denominations with 
significant ministries through the greater LouisviUe 
area. Louisville is also served by a strong network of fif- 
teen ecumenical community ministries across Jefferson 
County in which United Methodists play a m^or role. 

Louisville Agencies, 
Institutions, and People 




The R«v. Thomas W. Grieb is co-chair of the division of the Local 
Committee for General Conference that will oversee first aid 
services for the conference. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



17 



In the 1860's, Louisville had the publishing house of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, which was 
later moved to Nashville. Louisville was also the head- 
quarters for the M.E. Church, South, Board of Missions 
and Church Extension. That board constructed a large 
gray limestone headquarters building, which is now the 
United Methodist Center of the Louisville Conference. 
Offices of the conference council on ministries and coun- 
cil on finance and administration are currently located 
in that building located next to Fourth Avenue UMC. 

The episcopal office for the Louisville Area is located 
in Louisville, currently at the Professional Towers 
Building in Dupont Circle. 

Three other m^or institutions of the conference are 
also located in Louisville. Wesley Community House at 
803 East Washington Street has served the inner city 
since 1903. Wesley House is supported by the National 
Division of the General Board of Global Ministries, the 
Louisville Conference, and the United Way of Louis- 
ville. Methodist Evangelical Hospital was jointly devel- 
oped by the United Methodist and Evangelical (now 
UCC) denominations and is part of the Alliant Hospital 
Center in downtown Louisville. Wesley Manor, a full 
service residential and nursing facility for older adults, 
is located in south-central Jefferson County. 

The national headquarters of the Presbyterian 
Church, U.SA. are located in Louisville and the city is 
home to two seminaries — Louisville Presbyterian Theo- 





^ ^ '' ' 



Fourth Av«nu« United Methodiat Church was organized in 1888. 
Some International delegate* and gueat will be lerved lunoh here. 



logical Seminary and Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. 

Bishop Roy Hunter Short was bom and grew up in 
Louisville within a mile of the meeting site for the 1992 
General Conference. His home church, Marcus Lindsey, 
is still an active congregation in downtown Louisville. 
Bishop Short was elected to the episcopacy firom the 
Louisville Conference in 1948. 

Mrs. Nettie Alice Green, the first Black person to 
serve as president of Southeastern Jurisdiction United 
Methodist Women (1972-1976), continues to be active in 
the Louisville District as a member of New Coke UMC. 

History of Louisville 
United Methodism 

United Methodism has had organized congregations 
in Louisville since 1806, twenty-six years afl«r the 
founding of the city. Almost certainly the first place of 
worship and fellowship was a private home, then a log 
schoolhouse on the site of the present Jefferson County 
Courthouse on Jefferson Street between Fifth and Sixth 
Streets. 

The early Methodists biiilt their own church of brick 
(thirty-four by thirty-eight) in 1809, on the river side of 
Market Street, between Seventh and Eighth Streets. 
Bishop Francis Asbury preached in this building in Oc- 
tober, 1812. In 1816 this congregation moved to Fourth 
Street to a site currently incorporated into the Com- 
monwealth Convention Center, where the 1992 Gen- 
eral Conference is meeting. The Fourth Street location 
was abandoned in 1853. Today's Fourth Avenue United 
Methodist Church was organized in 1888. 

The second oldest strand in Louisville United Meth- 
odist history is firom the United Brethren in Christ 
(UB). A UB church was established in 1811 or 1812 at a 
location near Bardstown Road and Douglass Boulevard 
where St. Paul UMC stands today. At the time of the 
1968 merger, three Evangelical United Brethren 
churches in Louisville (Zion, First, jmd Virginia Ave- 
nue) became a part of the Louisville Conference. 

Louisville Methodism must have been biracial from 
the first. Fourth Street Church had both White and 
Black members. R.E. Jones Temple is Louisville's old- 
est predominately Black United Methodist congrega- 
tion. Under the name of Jackson Street it was 
organized in 1858 for the Black members of Brook 
Street Church (1835-1865). 



— Dr. Charlet Brockmell and Rhoda Peters 

(Historical research of Louisville taken from paper by 
Rev. Rob MortonStout from Louisville, currently a pas- 
tor in the Baltimore Conference). 



18 



May 5, 1992 



Welcome — We Are Ready for You! 



One question has been asked almost daily in Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in recent months by the Local Commit- 
tee for General Conference from the host Louisville 
Conference. Finding answers to that questions has been 
a daily task for the past nine months for this committee 
and for hundreds of United Methodists from across the 
conference who have become involved. 

The question? How do you get ready for more than 
5,000 guests from all over the world for two weeks? An- 
swers include: 

Recruiting greeters for May 4-5 at Louisville's Stan- 
diford Field Airport; 

Baking 240,000 homemade cookies for the delegates' 
breaks; 

Providing a pool of thirty-six word processor opera- 
tors; 

Setting up a first-aid room to be staffed around the 
clock with medical personnel; 

Arranging for ambulance service if needed to the 
nearby Methodist-Evangelical Hospital; 

F*reparing the elements for the opening Communion 
service (How much grape jviice do you buy for 5,000 per- 
sons?); 

Designating 80 clergy to assist in serving Commun- 
ion to the visitors' section of the conference (the bishops 
serve the delegates); 

Arranging for office equipment, computers, and fur- 
nishings to be set up in the Convention Center for the 
use of the conference; 

Recruiting volunteers, including a corps of signers 
for the deaf and hard of hearing; assistants for persons 
with handicapping conditions; registration personnel; 
ushers for afternoon worship services; staff for the Dele- 
gates' Lounge and the Information and Message Cen- 
ter; 

Lining up a host of volunteers to set up the Conven- 
tion Center furnishings — and two weeks later tear 
them down. 

Spirited Preparations 

In fact, Louisville Conference United Methodists 
have been busUy preparing to host the conference for 
more than two years. William Yates, lay co-chair of the 
local committee notes that this is a "once in a lifetime 
event" for local UMs and comments, "It is a high honor 
and privilege to host the General Conference." 

Delegates, spouses, bishops, judicial covmcil mem- 
bers, staff^ and visitors are in Louisville at an optimum 
time of the year. Spring is at its best in early May. The 
week-long Kentucky Derby Festival has just con- 
cluded — although this timing has also meant logistical 



problems to solve with flight schedules and hotel prepa- 
rations as Derby guests depart on May 3 and General 
Conference delegates arrive on May 4 and 5. 

The Kentucky and Red Bird Conferences (Louis- 
ville's sister conferences in the eastern half of the state, 
which together with the Louisville Conference form the 
Louisville Episcopal Area) are hosting the pre-confer- 
ence Council of Bishops' meeting in Lexington, Ken- 
tucky, the week prior to General Conference. The 
bishops will be meeting in the heart of central Ken- 
tucky's beautiful horse farm region. 

The Commission on the General Conference, with of- 
fices in Indianapolis, is responsible for overall planning 
of the conference. This body is elected by and reports di- 
rectly to (jeneral Conference. The locetl committee is 
named by the host conference to assist the commission 
and to arrange for local hospitality. "It gives us the op- 
portunity to do something for the whole United Method- 
ist Church," notes Dr. Wallace Thomas, clergy co-chair 
of the local committee, and pastor of Christ Church, 
United Methodist in Louisville. 

The 30-member local committee has worked closely 
with Dr. DeWayne S. Woodring, who serves as business 
manager/executive director of the Commission on the 
(jeneral Conference. Committee members are involving 
persons from all 514 churches in the conference and 
several hundred Louisville Conference UM's will be 
helping directly. The local committee's three megor divi- 
sions are in the areas of staffing and equipment, pro- 
gram, and hospitality. Each division has lay and clergy 
co-chairs and a number of subcommittees. 

Louisville Conference UMs have been preparing 
spiritually as well as structurally for hosting General 




Some members meet for the 1992 Local Committee for General 
Conference (LCGC). Left to right: Biahop Robert H. St>ain, 
LouiBville Episcopal Area; Mrs. Janie C. Brown, Loviisville 
Conference UMW president and member of the LCGC; Mr. 
William O. Yates, lay co-chair, LCGC; Dr. Wallace E. Thomas, 
clergy co«hair, LCGC. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



19 



Conference. The Devotional Life Area of the Conference 
Board of Disdpleship initiated a year of prayer of be- 
half of the General Conference. Every United Methodist 
in the conference was invited to participate in that year 
of prayer. That committee is also staffing a prayer 
room, which will be continuously available to delegates 
and visitors during the conference. 

Welcoming Event May 4 

Two m^or celebrative events are the responsibility 
of the host conference. The first was the Episcopal Re- 
ception, held last evening. This was the official welcom- 
ing event for all delegates and visitors. The theme, 
"1792-1992 Celebration," commemorated the 200th an- 
niversary of General Conference as well as the bicen- 
tennial of Kentucky as a Commonwealth. It was held at 
the Gait House East, one of Louisville's famed historic 
hotels. 

"Lost in Wonder, Love, and Praise" 
May 10 

The second major event for which the host confer- 
ence is responsible will showcase local and jurisdic- 
tional United Methodism. "Lost in Wonder, Love and 
Praise" is scheduled for Simday, May 10, the Sunday 
between the two work weeks of the conference, and will 
take place at two times, 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. 

This Host Conference Event will feature a musical 
celebration of the new United Methodist Hymnal. This 
event will highlight United Methodism's musical, relig- 
ious, ethnic, emd cultural diversity as it is reflected in 
the hymnal. 

"Lost in Wonder, Love and Praise" will be performed 
in downtown Louisville's Macauley Theater. Each pro- 
gram will begin with a hymn-sing of gigantic propor- 
tions. From the new United Methodist Hymnal will 
come a variety of hymns old and new. Orchestra and a 
200-voice choir will lead as UM's sing everything from 
"Heleluyan" to "Lift High the Cross." Included in the 
program will be a group of Wesley hymns. The confer- 
ence-wide choir has been preparing for weeks under the 
direction of Michael Beattie and Dan Stokes, choirmas- 
ters at Louisville's St. Paul and Christ churches, respec- 
tively. 

The second part of each program will feature the in- 
ternationally famous Junaluska Singers of the South- 
eastern Jurisdiction, the host jurisdiction for the 
conference. The Junaluska Singers are a group of tal- 
ented and committed young musicians from all over the 
Southeastern Jurisdiction. Dr. Glenn Draper directs the 
singers. Based at the jurisdiction's Lake Junaluska As- 
sembly in North Carolina, the young singers draw large 




Macauley Theatre will be the site of the Host Conference Elvent, a 
miuical festival entitled "TiOBt in Wonder, Love, and Prabe." The 
event is scheduled for Sunday, May 10, with performances at 4H)0 
pjn. and 7K)0 p.m. 

crowds whenever they sing. With a variety of music 
they will provide a rousing end to this delightfid pro- 
gram. 

"Lost in Wonder, Love and Praise" will be a two- 
hour program. Complementary tickets have been made 
available to General Conference delegates, bishops, ju- 
dicial council members, and their spouses. Tickets are 
available to visitors at $10.00 each by calling Jane 
Ryan at the United Methodist Center at 584-6616. 

Local Church 
Hospitality 

Louisville United Methodists will have the "red car- 
pet rolled out" on Sunday, May 10, in many ways. Local 
churches in the greater Louisville area are inviting 
bishops and clergy delegates to preach on that Sunday. 
Many local UM's have signed up to host delegates and 
visitors for the day, planning to take them to worship 
services, treat them to "Sunday dinner," give them a 



20 



May 5, 1992 



tour of some of the local points of interest, and accom- 
pany them to the host conference event. 

Weekday afternoon preaching services and overflow 
meetings for some groups will be held in two of Louis- 
ville's downtown churches closest to the Convention 
Center. Trinity Towers at Third and Guthrie is a seven- 
teen-floor high rise building that includes a 500-seat 
sanctuary; a rooftop chapel-in-the-sky which offers a 
breathtaking view of the dty; and 218 apartment units, 
many of which are inhabited by older adults. The 
church sanctuary contains one of Louisville's art treas- 
ures — a signed Tiffany stained glass window of exqui- 
site beauty. 

International delegates and guests will be having 
limch daily at historic Fourth Avenue United Method- 
ist Church at the comer of Fourth and St. Catherine 
Streets. Fourth Avenue is housed in an outstanding 
Gothic structure with an imported mahogany-panelled 
sanctuary that seats about 1,200 people. Fourth Avenue 
is developing a meaningful ministry in an inner dty 
area that houses many older adults and persons from a 
variety of ethnic groups and economic dasses. Senior 
minister. Rev. Edgar Coins, is the church's first black 
pastor. His appointment in 1991 was the first m^or 
cross-raci£il appointment in the Louisville Conference. 



Eager Anticipation 

In spite of the financial limits, the local committee 
has striven to be lavish in their warmth and in their 
contributions of time, talent, and expertise to hosting 
the conference. Working together on all that is reciuired 
has unified the conference in a unique way. 

As the General Conference opens, the mood of the 
Louisville Conference is best summed up in the words 
of Bishop Robert H. Spain. He said, "We are exdted 
about it — exdted that the world of United Methodism 
can see what we're doing here in Kentucky!" 

Louisville Conference United Methodists are equally 
excited that they in turn will be experiencing United- 
Methodism fi-om across the nation and around the 
world. 

— Rhoda Peters, Director 

Louisville Conference Council on Ministriee and Co-Chair, IVogram 
Division, General Conference Local Conunittee portions of this article 
have been ad^ted by the author from "Welcome to Louisville and Gen- 
eral Conference, 1992," Mature Team, Spring 1992, Copyright 1991 by 
Ccdceebury and used by permission. 



L 



Financial 
Considerations 



The Louisville Conference is a relatively small con- 
ference of approximately 90,000 members. A major con- 
cern has been to plan for the warmest hospitality yet to 
exercise responsible stewardship of financial resources 
within the conference. 

While the m^or operations of the conference are 
paid for by the Commission on the General Conference, 
the cost of the Episcopal Reception, Host Conference 
Special Event, local transportation, and many ameni- 
ties are imderwritten by the Local General Conference 
Committee. The Louisville Conference set aside $50,000 
to apply to these costs and an additional $22,000 has 
been raised fi*om other sources. The committee deter- 
mined to live within this budget, feeling this represents 
responsible stewardship in today's world. 

Therefore, delegates who have previously attended 
General Conferences may notice some minor changes. 
Delegates are being requested to pay for their bever- 
ages at the coffee breaks. (The cookies have been baked 
and donated firom across the conference.) Few delegates 
probably would realize that coffee alone for delegates' 
breaks would cost about $11,000. The Louisville Confer- 
ence believes that future conferences that host General 
Conference will likewise need to be sensitive to good 
stewardship in their planning. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



21 



What to Do and See in Louisville 



A City Blending Southern Charm 
and Northern Sophistication 
on the Banks of the Ohio River 

Louisville blends the past, present, and future for a 
unique personality and an atmosphere that visitors of 
all ages and backgrounds can enjoy. As a visitor or dele- 
gate to the 1992 General Conference, plan some time 
for sightseeing. A number of sites of interest are within 
easy walking distance from the Commonwealth Con- 
vention Center in the heart of Louisville's downtown 
area. 

As the gateway to America's first westward expan- 
sion, Louisville is rich in an American heritage that is 
reflected in a unicjue blend of Southern charm and 
Northern sophistication. Louisville was founded in 1778 
by George Rogers Clark, and quickly grew into a thriv- 
ing river port at the Falls of the Ohio River. Through 
the 1800s Louisville was a center for processing and 
shipping tobacco, bourbon, textiles, and agricultural 
products. 

At the Riverfront 

Today Louisville's riverfront is once again alive with 
activity. The Falls Fountain signifies the commitment 
of Louisville to its riverfront. Anchored in the Ohio 
River, computerized jets propel water into a 375-foot 



high fieur-de-lis pattern, the symbol of Louisville. The 
world's largest floating fountain symbolizes the pride of 
heritage and conmiitment to the future. 

Just down the river from the fountain is the oldest 
treasure in the LouisviUe area — the unique geographic 
beauty of the Falls of the Ohio. As the only exposed bed- 
rock in the 981-mile length of the river, the area jwo- 
vides a significant source of study in paleontology, 
geology, and ornithology. The Falls is also renowned 
for its well-preserved fossilized corals. 

The Belle of Louisville anchors in the Ohio River at 
Fourth Street. She is the oldest operating Mississippi- 
style stern wheeler in the United States. Built in 1914, 
she was recently named a Nationjd Historic Landmark. 

A Glimpse of the Past 

Not far from the riverfront you'll find examples of 
fine human handiwork. Louisville's Meiin Street collec- 
tion of 19th century cast-iron facades is second only to 
those in New York City's Soho District. Other examples 
of historic architectural styles can be found in the 19th 
century Victorian residences of Old Louisville (the 
city's first suburb) and in the shotgun and camel back 
homes of Butchertown. 

Of special note in the historic Butchertown area near 
downtown is the Wesley Community House, a United 




In the forground of the LouisviUe ekyline, the Falls Fountain project* a 876-foot high fleur-de-Ue pattern, the symbol of Louisville. 



22 



May 5, 1992 



Methodist ministry in the inner city since 1903. Wesley 
House is supported by the Gleneral Board of Global Min- 
istries, the Louisville Conference, and the United Way 
of Louisville. It provides day care for low-Lncome fami- 
lies and human services and programs to meet the 
needs of children, youth, and older adults. 

While you're in the neighborhood, also tour the Tho- 
mas Edison House and Museum. This is an 1840 "shot- 
gun cottage" where the famous inventor rented a room 
in the 1860s to begin his career as a Western Union 
telegraph operator in Loviisville. Both Wesley House 
and the Thomas Edison House are about a five-minute 
ride from the Commonwealth Convention Center. 

History and architecture combine to attract thou- 
sands of visitors annually to each of Louisville's historic 
homes. Farmington, designed by Thomas Jefferson, and 
Locust Grove, the last home of General George Rogers 
Clark, offer special activities for visitors throughout the 
year. The Victorian-style Conrad House in Old Louis- 
ville is also open to visitors. 

Louisville also honors the past with memorials in 
the 141-year-old, 300-acre Cave Hill Cemetery and Ar- 
boretum, and Zachary Taylor National Cemetery. 

Connecting the Past 

Connecting past with present is a specialty eimong 
Louisville's many museums and visual and performing 
arts groups. The Musemn of History and Science com- 
bines past, present, and future in a wealth of historic 
and hands-on exhibits that explore our natiu-al history 
and science. The new IMAX Theater, with four-story 
screen and six-track sound ^stem, provides state-of-the- 
art technology in motion. 

Historians frequent the Filson Club Library and Mu- 
seum to research and to view relics of Kentucky's his- 
tory. Exhibits and toiu-s are regularly scheduled at the 
Howard Steamboat Museum, Portland Museum, Eisen- 
berg Museum, John Conti Coffee Museum, and Ken- 
tucky Fried Chicken's Colonel Harland Sanders 
Museum. The Kentucky Derby Museum pays tribute to 
the 116-year-old Kentucky Derby thoroughbred horse 
race through participatory exhibits, replays of past 
races, artifacts, and a 360-degree multimedia presenta- 
tion. The J.B. Speed Art Museum, Kentucky's oldest 
emd largest art museum exhibits classic works by Rem- 
brandt, Rubens, Monet, Picasso, and Thomas Moore. 

Kentucky's arts and crafts are cherished worldwide. 
Skilled artisans continue to produce items using proc- 
esses handed down through generations. The Kentucky 
Art and Craft Gallery, Louisville Stoneware, and 
Hadley Pottery are just a few of the places providing 
the opportunity to take home a piece of Louisville's 
heritage. 



The past and present come alive through productions 
by Louisville's performing arts groups. The internation- 
ally-known Louisville Ballet and Orchestra, the Ken- 
tucky Opera, Stage One: Children's Theater, and other 
regional, national, and international performing groups 
provide the Kentucky Center for the Arts with excite- 
ment year-round The Kentucky Center, a modern facil- 
ity for the performing arts, centers around a lobby with 
arching windows providing a panoramic view of the 
river and its fountain. 

The Tony Award-winning Actors Theater of Louis- 
ville is internationally known for the Hxmiana Festival 
of New American Plays, many of which go on to Broad- 
way. The Actors Theater is housed in a renovated Na- 
tional Historic landmark originally designed as a bank 
by the famed architect, Gideon Shryock. 

Alive in the Present 

Louisville's 10,000-acre park system provides daily 
eiyoyment for thousands of families. Of the 137 parks, 
sixteen were designed by Frederick Law Olmstead, de- 
signer of New York's Central Park. Families also enjoy 
the Louisville Zoo, located near downtown, which offers 
more than 900 species and a new Herp Aquarium com- 
plete with rain forest. The Kentucky Kingdom Amuse- 
ment Park, featuring three roller coasters and 
undergoing a 13.5 million doUar expansion, includes an 
action-packed water park. 

Tours of some of the country's most interesting and 
highly mechanized industrial plants provide a first- 
hand look at modern production techniques. The 
HiUerich and Bradsby tovur of the Louisville Slugger 
baseball bat factory was named last year as one of the 
top ten industrial tours in the nation by U.S. News and 
World Report. 

Where to Dine 
inLouisville 

All of the hotels housing General Conference dele- 
gates and visitors have fine restaurants and coffee 
shops. Other Louisville area restaurants cater to every 
taste. Many of them are within walking distance or a 
free Toonerville 11 TroUey ride from your hotel. Consult 
the restaurant guide in your packet. 

There is a cluster of fast food restaurants on the 
third floor in the Galleria, about one block from Com- 
monwealth Convention Center. This food covurt is open 
iroxQ 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 
to 8:00 on Thursday, and from, noon to 5:00 p.m. on Svm- 
day. 

Buckhart's Liberty Street Restaurant is open from 
11:00 a.m. through 10:00 p.m. daily and closed on Sun- 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



23 



day. The Colonnade Cafeteria on the lower level in the 
Starks Building (comer of 4th and Muhammad Ali) is 
open for breakfast and lunch Monday through Friday, 
7:00 a.m. through 2:00 p.m. Where available, Derby Pie 
is always a favorite and traditional Kentucky dessert. 



brandt, Rubene, Tiepolo, Bartolommeo, and Picasso. 
Free. 

Water Tower. River Road at Zom Avenue. Was 
once the city's only water pumping station, now a con- 
temporary art center. 



Information from Louisville Convention and Visitors 
Bureau 

— Edited by Jody Laaaiter 
Fourth Avenue UMC 



Louisville Attractions 
Historic Homes 

Conrad House. 1402 St. James Court (636-5023). 
Victorian era house completely renovated with period 
furnishings. $3.00. 

Farmington Historic Home. 3033 Bardstown Road 
(452-9920). Federal-style home using a design by Tho- 
mas Jefferson. Adults $3.00, students $1.00, children 
6«e. 

Locust Grove Historic Home. 561 Blankenbaker 
Lane (897-9845). Georgian plantation, last home of 
General George Rogers Clark. $3.00. 

Thomas Edison's Butchertown Homes/Muse- 
ums. 729 East Washington Street (585-5247). Double 
"shotgun cottage." $1.00 donation. 

Spalding University Mansion — Younger 
Woman's Club Charity Showhouse. 851 South 
Fourth Street (585-9911). Free. 

Museums 

Eisenberg Museum, Baptist Theological Seminary. 
2825 Lexington Road (8974141). Egyptian and near 
eastern antiquities, mummy, Bibles, and artifacts of 
biblical times. Free. 

Filson Club. 1310 South Third Street (635-5083). 
America's historic libraries and manuscripts museum. 
Free, library $2.00. 

John Conti Coffee Factory Museum. 4023 Bard- 
stown Road (499-8600). The only coffee museum of its 
kind in U.S. Free. 

Kentucky Derby Museum at Churchill Downs. 
704 Central Avenue (637-1111). World's largest mu- 
seum of its kind. Adults $3.50, senior categories $2.50, 
children $1.50. 

Museum of History and Science/IMAX Theater. 
727 West Main Street (561-6103). Has Kidspace for 
ages 7 and under. Adults $3.50, senior categories, 
$2.50. 

J.B. Speed Art Museum. 2035 South Third Street 
(636-2893). Museum has amassed treasures of Rem- 



Other Attractions and Recreation 

Kentucky Center for the Arts. Five Riverfront 
Plaza (562-1050). Guided tour $.75 cents. 

Kentucky Art and Craft Gallery. 609 West Main 
Street (589-0102). 

Belle of Louisville Cruise. Wharf at Fourth and 
River Road (625-2355). Old fashioned cruise of the Ohio 
River. 

Star of Louisville. 151 East River Road (581-0289). 
Luxurious cruising and dining on the beautiful Ohio 
River. 

Humana Building. Fifth and Main Streets (580- 
3600). Loggia houses 50-foot waterfall. Lobby furnished 
in marble from Italy and France. Statues adorn ro- 
tunda and mezzanine. Free. 

Hillerich and Bardsby Company. 1525 Charle- 
stown Road, New Albany, Indiana. Home of Louisville 
Slugger baseball bat (585-5226). Free. 

Churchill Downs. 700 Central Avenue (6364400). 
Home of the famous Kentucky Derby. 

Louisville Zoo. 110 Trevilian Way (459-2181). 1300 
animals in open naturalist environments. 

Toonerville II Trolley. Connects four m^or down- 
town hotels. Free. 

Louisville Horse Trams. 1048 East Main Street 
(581-0100). A romantic way to see downtown Louisville. 



Some United Methodist Sites 
of Interest 

Wesley Commimity House. 803 East Washington 
Street (583-8317). A United Methodist ministry in the 
inner city since 1903. Open daily. 

Wesley Manor. 5012 East Manslick Road (969- 
3277). Lovely suburban retirement home owned by the 
Louisville Conference. Will pick up at hotel for group 
tours. Call for information. 

Trinity Temple Towers. Third and Guthrie Streets 
(585-2905). United Methodist church in the heart of 
downtown. Roof top chapel in the sky. 500-8eat sanctu- 
ary. Open daily. 

Fourth Avenue United Methodist Church. 
Fourth and St. Catherine Streets (585-2176). Outstand- 
ing Gothic structure. Imported mahogany sanctuary. 
Seats 1200. Open daily. 



24 



May 6. 1992 



St Paul United Methodist Church. 2000 Douglass 
Boulevard (459-1515). Has a series of commissioned 
stained-glass windows that tell the biblical story firom 
Creation through Resurrection. Early church history 
and United Methodist history including the 1939 Unifi- 
cation Window. Free. Tour available on request, call 
459-1595. 



Christ Church United Methodist 4614 Browns- 
boro Road (897-6421). Lomsville Conference's largest 
church. Open daily. 








The Belle of Louisville la America's oldest authentic ezcuraion stemwheeler. 
It has operated since 1914. It is anchored at the Riverfront. 



Churchill downs is the home of the Kentucky Derby. 
The 1992 running of the Derby was held last Saturday. 
Churchill Downs also houses the Kentucky Derby 
Museum. 




The Louisville Horse Trams offer daily service in the downtown area on horse-drawn 
carriages and trains. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



25 




Downtown Louisville 



Map 

No. Hotel 

C Commonwealth Convention Center 

(Site for all conference sessions). 

1 Gait House West 

2 Gait House East 

3 Hyatt Regency Louisville 

4 Seelbach 

5 Brown, A. Camberley 

6 Days Inn Downtown 

7 Quality Inn Downtown 

8 Travelodge 



26 



May 5, 1992 



STREET LEVEL 




street Level Room No. 

Choir Robing Dressing Room Lobby 

Correlation & Editorial Revision Dressing Room A 

Credentials Committee Show Office lA 

Daily Christian Advocate Sales South Lobby 

First Aid First Aid 

Food Service Hall C 

General Agencies Hall C Office 

Information, Message Center, Lost & Found Lobby 

Local Committee Show Office 

Marshals and Pages Dressing Room B/C 



Street Level Room No. 

Plenary Sessions Halls A & B 

Post Office Ticket Oflice 

Publishing House Exhibit Hall C 

Radio Office Dressing Room E 

Radio Recording Dressing Room H2 

Registration and Information Lobby 

Resource Literature Center Exhibit Hall C 

Tellers Dressing Room Lobby 

Video Editing Dressing Rooms F & G 

Video Office Dressing Room HI 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



27 



LOWER LEVEL 



MEZZANINE 




Communications 
117 



Xf L«J -y 

Corridor lo< Legislative Sub Committees 
— 1-1-7 — — «-i — '^ — ■ ■ ■ 



^ 




Conference 
Room 



Press 
Room 




f^ 



Ollice"' Board 
RecepI, 



iz. 



Elev 



I • 



I • 



Slair 



UPPER LEVEL 



Local Church 




General Adm. 
210 



Conferences 
209 



Ind. Com. 
208 



GCFA 

Financial Adm. 

207 



Higher Ed. 

211 
and Chaplaincy i\ 






<=v^ 




(i 


Central Cont. 






206 1 205 


) 




_ 


D 


d 


204 1 203 




rs 


<=\ /^ 


/^Y^ 


1 

202 1 201 

1 


Ordained and 


\ 


Diaconal Mm 





Lower Level 



Room No. Mezzanine Level Room No. 



Agenda Co[Diilttt<« 101 

BishoiM 109 

Biahop* SpoiuM 104 

Calendar Committee 101 

CliuiTh and Society • Legislative Committee 105-106 

Communicationa 1 17 

Daily Chriatian Advocate 1 16 

Delegate Lounge. 113 

Diacipleahip - Legislative Committee 107.108 

Global Ministriea .Legislative Committee 110.111- 

Mceting Rooma. 114-1 15 

NewBcope 1 16 

Reference Committee 101 

Secretary of General Conference 103 

Secretarial Staff. _ 102 



12 



Commission 

on General Conference ...Board Room 
Office for Delegate* 

from Outaide the U.S OfSce *l 

Registrar OfRce # 1 

Treasurer, 

Genera] Conference Conference 

Room 



Upper Level Room 

Central Conference Affairs 205-206 

Conferences • Legislstive Committee 209 

Courtesies & Privileges Committee. 220 

Fsitb it Mission - Legislative Committee 212 thn 

Financial Administration - Legislative Committee. 207 

General Admin. /Judicial Admin. - Legislative Committee.. 210 

General Council on Finance * Administrstion 207 

Higher Education & Chaplaincy - Legislative Committee... 21 1 

Independent Commiaaione - Legislative Committee 206 

Local Church ■ Legialative Committee 216-219 

Meeting Room 203 

Ordained & Diaconal Ministry - Legislative Committee 201-202 

Prayer Room 204 

Preaiding Officera Committee 200 

Judicial Council Hyatt R 

Board) 



28 



May 5, 1992 



Additional Delegates 



Eastern Angola (2) 

Section D, Row 5, Seats 5-6 

*Cavunge, Miguel M. (2), Caixa Postal No. 9, Malange, 

Angola 
Andre, Joaquim G. (10), Ceiixa Postal No. 9, Malange, 

Angola 

Reserves 

Carlos Joaquim, Caixa Postal No. 9, Malange, Angola 
Gregorio Lms R., Caixa Postal No. 9, Malange, Angola 



Great Britain 

Section B, Row 18, Seats 1^ 

*Beck, Brian E. (2), conference secretary; Conference 

OfBce, 1 Central Buildings, Westminster, London 

SWIH 9NH, Great Britain 
Dybdahl, Christine A. (3), synod secretary; 98 Walmley 

Road, Sutton Coldfield, W. Midlands, BD76 8QD, 

Great Britain 
Hodge, Rachel (1), teacher; Birley Fold, Saccary Lane, 

Mellor, Blackburn, Lanes BBl 9DU, Great Britain. 
Timothy, Bankole (7), journalist; 19 Queenscourt, 

Queensway, London W2 4QN, Great Britain 



Middle Philippines (2) 

Section C, Row 9, Seats 11-12 

Flores, Jose M. (11), pastor; The United Methodist 
Church, Quibadia, Obando, Bulacan, Philippines 

*Samson, Gerardo F., Jr. (5), businessman; 126 Villa 
Corazon-B, (jronzales St., Xavierville, Loyola 
Heights, Quezon City, Philippines 

Reserves 

Meneses, Rogelio C, district superintendent; 

Tarlac Student Center, Tarlac, Philippines 
Toquero, Solito K., pastor; Bulacan, Bulacan, 

Philippines 
Ramos, Norberto M., district superintendent; 

Liang, Malolos, Bulacan, Philippines 
Gallema, Marcelo B. , district superintendent; 

Brgy. 3, Ma. Aurora, Amrora, Philippines 
Padang, Jose L, pastor; T.M. Kalaw, Manila, 

Philippines 
Dizon, Maximo B., district superintendent; The United 

Methodist Church, Sta. Rosa. Nueva Ecija, 

Philippines 
Ocampo, Generoso C, district superintendent; 

Liang, Malolos, Bulacan, Philippines 



Mendillo, Eugenia G., seminary faculty; 

Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philippines 
Magna, Catalino P., pastor; Tarlac, Tarlac, Philippines 
Tapia, Elizabeth S., seminary faculty; Dasmarinas, 

Cavite, Philippines 
Macaso, Alberto F., pastor; Sandangco Street, 

Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Padolina, Samuel R., pastor; Palayan City, Philippines 
Francisco, Ciriaco Q., pastor; Liang, Malolos, Bulacan, 

Philippines 
Azurin, Benedicto V., district superintendent; 616 

Mabini Ext., Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Dizon, Aurora A., pastor; Sta. Rosa, Nueva Ecija, 

Philippines 
Sadsad, Domingo, M., district superintendent; The 

United Methodist Church, Sta. Maria, Bulacan, 

Philippines 
dela Cruz, Rufino S., Jr., pastor; Gen. Tinio, 

Nueva Edja, Philippines 
Velasco, Rolando C, pastor; Hagonoy, Bulacan, 

Philippines 
Padilla, Romulo N., pastor; Gatbuca, Calumpit, 

Bulacan, Philippines 
delos Santos, Elias L., pastor; Polo, Obando, 

Bulacan, Philippines 
Baluyot, Benjamin C, pastor; Tajil, Bocaue, 

Bulacan, Philippines 
Liwag, Placido T., pastor; Cabiao, Nueva Ecija, 

Philippines 
Ladignon, Conrado, Irrigation Adm. employee; Gapan, 

Nueva Ecija, Philippines 
Capistrano, Melanio R., law practitioner; Quibadia, 

Obando, Bulacan, Philippines 
Beltran, Rodolfo C, law practitioner; Mabini Ext. 

Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Galang, Ernesto, professor; Wesleyan University, 

Philippines 
Genes, Antonio, Talabutab Norte, Gen. Natividad, 

Nueva Ecija, Philippines 
Abesamis, Armand, Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Calalang, Mary Gener G., medical practitioner; Taal, 

Bocaue, Bulacan, Philippines 
Ramos Norberto S., Jr., Liang, Malolos, 

Bulacan, Philippines 
Castillo, Bernardo J., businessman; Plaridel, 

Bulacan, Philippines 
Petines, Alice S., Taal, Bocaue, Bulacan, Philippines 
Aniag, Padfico B., business; Atlag, Malolos, Bulacan, 

Philippines 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



29 



Ocampo, Eunice M., deaconess/teacher; 

San Agustin, Hagonoy, Bulacan, Philippines 
Tecson, Vicente 
Lnmba, Dorcas, medical practitioner; La Paz, 

Tarlac, Philippines 
Garcia, Jeremias, administrative assistant; 

Wesleysm University, Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Carpio, Adela C, Diaat. Ma. Aurora, Aurora, 

Philippines 
Marquez, Danny, engineer; Baler, Aurora, Philippines 
Agulan, Benny, university employee; Wesleyan 

University, Cabanatuan City, Philippines 
Mendillo, Magdalena R., deaconess; Union Theological 

Seminary, Dasmarinas, Cavite, Philippines 
Manio, Carlos M., manager; Malolos, Bulacan, 

Philippines 
Estiller, BeAJamin, Rizal, Nueva Ecya, Philippines 
Calagui, Domingo; Tarlac, Tarlac, Philippines 



Sierra Leone 

Section D Row 20 Seats 1-2 
Reserves 

Tommy, Francis B.J., 31 Lightfoot Boston Street, 
Freetown, Sierra Leone 

Lagawo, Richard E. S.31 Lightfoot Boston Street, 
Freetown, Sierra Leone 



Southern Zaire (8) 

Section D, Row 9, Seats 1-8 

*Muteb, Mufind (2), director/pastor; P.O. Box 22037, 

Kitwe, Zambia 
Djungu, Nkemba (10), district superintendent; 

P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Mutombu, Nduu M. (1), director/pastor; P.O. Box 

22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Katwebe, Mwenze (8), district superintendent; P.O. Box 

22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Kamukwapa, Kanpunzu (2), teacher; P.O.Box 22037, 

Kitwe, Zeunbia 
Kalau, Mwamb (5), hospital administrator; 

P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Muyepwe, Jacqueline Kyupa (6), school inspector; 

P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Munung, A-Kafat (3), teacher; P.O. Box 22037, 

Kitwe, Zambia 



Reserves 

Tepa, Mbangu, pastor; P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Mpoyo, Bwishita, pastor; P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, 

Zambia 
Chipi, Chenu, P.O. Box 22037, Kitwe, Zambia 
Musonda, Shimpundu, school coordinator; P.O. Box 

22037, Kitwe, Zambia 



Zimbabwe (2) 

Section B, Row 15, Seats 11-12 

Mafondokoto, Jairus W. (2), headmaster; P. Bag P7024, 

Mutare, Zimbabwe 
*Kangara, Pedzisai (3), headmaster; P.B. Box 210, 

Mutoko, Zimbabwe 
Reserves 
Mukwindidza, Kennedy F. conference council director; 

P.O. Box 3408, Harare, Zimbabwe 
Jokomo, Christopher C, headmaster; P.O. Box 662, 

Murewa, Zimbabwe 
Mudiwa, Peter, pastor in charge; P.O. Box 90, 

Nhedziwa, Zimbabwe 
Chiza, Richard, district superintendent; P.O. Box 662, 

Murewa, Zimbabwe 
Mwandira, Kelvin, circuit pastor; P.O. Box 3408, 

Harare, Zimbabwe 
Nhiwatiwa, Eben K, pastor; P.O. Box 3408, Harare, 

Zimbabwe 
Banda, Josphat C, lecturer; P.Bag H97 Hatfield, 

Harare, Zimbabwe 
Marange, Kennedy, circuit pastor; P.Bag P7024, 

Mutare, Zimbabwe 
Mukangara, Martha, circuit pastor; No. 1091 

Dangamvura, Mutare, Zimbabwe 
Zvinoira, John J., businessman; P.O. Box 666, Mutare, 

Zimbabwe 
Mutasa, Beatrice, lecturer; P.O. Box 3408, Harare, 

Zimbabwe 
Marima, William F., stewardship director; P.O. Box 

3408, Harare, Zimbabwe 
Chitsiku, Theodore, headmaster; P.O. Box 100, 

Nhedziwa, Zimbabwe 
Marange, Newton, P.O. Box 666, Mutare, Zimbabwe 
Gumiro, J., education officer; P.O. Box 666, Mutare, 

Zimbabwe 
Nyamupanda, Enock, headmaster; P.O. Box 666, 

Murewa, Zimbabwe 
Mutize, teacher; P.O. Box 58, Mutoko, Zimbabwe 
Tabvuma, Wilbert, manager; P.O. Box 3408, Harare, 

Zimbabwe 



30 



May 5, 1992 



Non- Voting Delegates 

from Affiliated Autonomous 

Methodist and United Churches 



Argentine Evangelical 
Methodist Church (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 3-4 

Caceres, Raquel M. ( ), E. Carbo 253, 3100 

Parana-Entre Rios, Argentina 
Ostapczuc, Jorge ( ), Mitre 1741 2 A, 2000 

Rosario-Santa Fe, Argentina 

The United Protestant Church 
in Belgium (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 5-6 

Beukenhorst, Martin J., ( ), president of the United 
Protestant Church in Belgium; c/o United 
Protestant Church in Belgium, rue du Champ de 
Mars, 5, B-1050, Brussels, Belgium 

Fraisse-Lheureux, Ruth ( ), c/o United Protestant 
Church in Belgium, rue du Champ de Mars, 5, 
B-1050, Brussels, Belgium 

Evangelical Methodist Church 
in Bolivia (2) 

Section B, Row 22, Seats 4-5 

Cespedes, Simon (), General Secretary of Services; 

Landaeta 423, Casilla 356, La Paz Bolivia 
Huacani, Carlos N. ( ), bishop; Landaeta 423, Casilla 

356, La Paz, Bolivia. 

The Methodist Church in Brazil (2) 

Section B, Row 22, Seats 1-3 
*Maia, Adriel de Souza (4), bishop; Caixa Postal 1466, 

30160 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil 
deOliveira, Lucia Leiga,(l), Rua Itajub'a, 2086 Apto. 

402, 30130 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil 
Fleischner, Renato Sodres (5), Caixa Postal 55.202, 

04799 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil 

The Methodist Church in Burma (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 7-8 

Khin, Daw Khin ( ), The Methodist Headquarters, No. 

22 Alanpya Pagoda Road, Yangon, Myanmar, 

Burma 
Wai, U. Thein ( ), The Methodist Headquarters, No. 22, 

Alanpya Pagoda Road, Yangon, Myanmar, Burma 

Methodist Church in Chile (2) 

Section D, Row 22, Seats 11-12 
Cartes, J. Gaston ( ), Casilla 753, Valdivia, Chile 



Romero, Quintin ( ), CasiUa 67, Santiago, Chile 

Methodist Church of the Republic 
of China (2) 

Section D, Row 22, Seats 9-10 

Kuey, Enoch (4 ), Bishop, The Methodist Church in the 
Republic of China; 6F, Chi Nan Road, Section 3, 
Taipei, Taiwan 10625 Rep. of China 

Mei, Juanita ( 8), principal; 6F, Chi Nan Road, Section 
3, Taipei, Taiwan 10625 Rep. of China 

Methodist Church in Cuba (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 9-10 

Sanchez, Humberto Fuentes ( ), San Lazaro #167, entre 
Aguila y Crespo, Ciudad Habana 10200, Cuba 

Castellanos, Cesar Blanc ( ), H-140 Apartado 5, Jose 
Marti District, Santiago de Cuba 90100. Cuba 

The Methodist Church in Indonesia (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 1-2 

Situmorang, Moto ( ), Jalan Kramat Jaya Baru, Blok 
GI/330, Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia 10560 

Gviltom, Julianus H. ( ), Jalan Dr. Prof. Latumetten, 
Gang Rahayu I No. 2, Jakarta Barat, Indonesia 

The Methodist Church in Malaysia (2) 

Section D, Row 22, Seats 7-« 

Seng, Soon Jin, Chinese Methodist Chm-ch, 28, Jalan 

Kg. Empat, 75300 Melaka, Malaysia 
Hii, Ching-Chiong ( 1), P.O.Box 827, 96008 SIBU, 

Sarawak, East Malaysia 

Reserves 

Arputharqj, Noel, Wisma TAC, Tingkat Satu, 42-1, 

Jalan Tun Sambanthan 3, 50490 Kuala Lumpur, 

Malaysia 
Ting, Kuin Mee, P.O. Box 2659, Bandar Seri Begawan 

1926, Brunei Darussalam 
Jingin, Baleng, 34, Lorong 10, Rejang Park, 9600 

SIBU, Sarawak, Malaysia 

The Methodist Church Singapore (2) 

Section D, Row 21, Seats 11-12 

Hong ,Chong Shit (1), Geylang Chinese Methodist 

Church, 52 Aljunied Road, Singapore 1438 
Chiang, Gilbert ( ), 6 Thomson Walk, Singapore 2057 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



31 



Methodist Church in India (3) 

Section D, Row 22, Seats 1-3 
Lai, Benjamin B. (4), Christ Methodist Church, 

BareiUy-243 001, India 

Christian, Vidya G. ( ), Navapura Pensionpura, 

Fatehganj, Vadodara-390 002, India 

Prasad, J. ( ), food inspector; House No. 1-5-96, I.B. 

Road, Station Area, Raichur-584 101, India 



The Korean Methodist Church (3) 

Section D, Row 22, Seats 4-6 

Kim, Jong Soo, bishop; Room 1114 Jung Woo Bldg., 

13-25 Yoido-Dong, Young Deung Po-Ku, Seoul, 

Korea 150-010 
Park, Woo Sung ( ), lay elder; Room 1114 Jung Woo 

Bldg., 13-25 Yoido-Dong, Young Deung Po-Ku, 

Seoul, Korea 150-010 
Urn, Mary ( ), General Secretary WSCS; Room 1114 

Jung Woo Bldg., 13-25 Yoido-Dong, Young Deung 

Po-Ku, Seoul, Korea 150-010 



Additions and Changes to Listing 
of Voting and Reserve Delegates 



(Pages 2»«6 Advance DCA D 



Baltimore 

Correct Name: Crider, R. Frederick 
Wogaman, J. Philip, 

Central Zaire 

Chair of Delegation: Djundu, Lunge 

German Northwest 

Chair of Delegation: Magdowski, Axel 

German Southwest 

Chair of Delegation: Els, Albrecht 

Hungary Provisional 

Remove: * Wladar, Antonia W.A. (deceased) 
Add: *Csernak, Istvan (7), pastor, Szinhas utca 6, 

H-4400 Niregyhaza, Hungary 
Remove: Hecker, Frigyes H.F. 
Add to end of reserve list: Szabo, Andor Sz. A., 

conference secretary, Londoni, krt. 30, 

Szeged, H-6722, Hungary 

Iowa 

Remove: Beardsley, Harry W. (deceased) 

Koth, C. Eugene (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: Christensen, Harlan L., 

retired firefighter, 3826 E. Tiffin, 

Des Moines, lA 50317 
Trusheim, Rudolf, pastor, 614 Randolph, 

Waterloo, lA 50702 

Memphis 

Remove: Clark, N. Jean 



Add to end of reserve list: Mills, David E., student, 
2749 Cloverdale Road, Obion, TN 38240 

Mexico 

Remove: Silva de Fuentes, Maria Elena 

de Maldonado, Narcedalia B., Justo Sierra No. 1812, 
Col. Viveros, 88070 Nuevo Laredo, Tamps, Mexico. 

North Arkansas 

Remove: Nixon, Freddie (resigned) 

Nixon, Victor H. (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: : Clark, N. Wayne, district 

superintendent, 1700 Bamhill Road, 

Paragould, AR 72450 

Quick, Jeff, student, 1910 Old Wire Road, 
FayetteviUe, AR 72703 

North Central Philippines 

Add to end of reserve list: Lazaro, Menah A., 

deaconess, 17 Luna Street, San Mateo, 
Isabela, Philippines 
Quidasol, Bienvenido M., land 
surveyor, Bantog Lintao, Roxas, 
Isabela, Philippines 
Cacayan, Charlie L., businessman, 
Rizal, Alicia, Isabela, Philippines 

North Georgia 

Correct Name: Darko, Morrell T. 

North Shaba 

Chair of Delegation: Nqeleka, Mpanga 



32 



May 5, 1992 



Northest Philippines 

Add as No. 13 reserve: Antonio, Jose M., diaconal 
minister, Phase 11, Baptista Village, 
Santiago, Isabela, Philippines 

Northeast Zaire 

Chair of Delegation: Okoko, Luhata R. 

Northern Philippines 

Remove: Siazon, Francisco M., Jr. (deceased) 
Add to end of reserve list: Cabulisan, Martin 

Sierra Leone 

Chair of Delegation: Rentier, Joseph J. K. 

Sweden 

Remove: Jansson, Sven-Erik 

Add to end of reserve list: Lindberg, Bo 



West Middle Philipppines 

Chair of Delegation: Dizon, Rolando A. 

Western Angola 

Chair of Delegation: Agostinho, Vicoria J.S. 

Western New York 

Correct Name: Bigler, Patricia A. 

Western North Carolina 

Remove: Middlebrooks, Willie L., Jr. (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: Sherrill, Katherine C, 
pastor, 4814 Zephyr Lane, Charlotte, NC 28209 

Western Pennsylvania 

Remove : Hopson, Esther (resigned) 
Add to end of reserve list: Johnson, John "Jerry" G., 
retired, 314 E. Butler Street, Mercer, PA 16137 



$ 



Changes in Standing Legislative Committees 



Church and Society 

Remove: Greenway, Harold E. (Western Pennsylvania) 

Massey, Mary Alice (Florida) 
Add: Chiang, Gilbert (Singapore) 

de Oliveira, Lucia Leiga (Brazil) 

Hii, Ching-Chiong (Malaysia) 

Hodge, Rachel (Great Britain) 

Mutombu, Nduu M. (Southern Zaire) 

Pearce, Charles W. (Florida) 

Conferences 

Remove: Morrell, J. Darko (North Georgia) 

Add: Beck, Brian E. (Great Britain) 

Cavunge, Miquel M. (Eastern Angola) 
Darko, J. Morrell (North Georgia) 
Kumukwapa, Kampunzu (Southern Zaire) 
Mafbndokoto, Jairus W. (Zimbabwe) 
Muteb, Mufind (Southern Zaire) 

Discipleship 

Remove: Marquardt, Manfred (German Northwest) 
Silva de Fuentes, Maria Elena (Mexico) 

Add: de Maldonado, Narcedalia B. (Mexico) 

Dydahl, Christine A. (Great Britain) 
Els, Albrecht (German Southwest) 
Gala, Rosendo (Southwest Philippines) 
Kangara, Pedzisai (Zimbabwe) 
Kuey, Enoch (China) 
Munung, A-Kafat (Southern Zaire) 



Faith and Mission 

Remove: Els, Albrecht (German Southwest) 

Add: Lai, Benjamin B. (India) 

Maia, Adriel de Souza (Brazil) 
Marquardt, Manfred (CJerman Northwest) 

Financial Administration 

Remove: Djamba, Wunga (Central Zaire) 
Add: de la Cruz, Cherry (Southwest Philippines) 

Fleischner, Renato Soares (Brazil) 
Kalau, Mwamb (Southern Zaire) 
Lomoto, Ombaku (Central Zaire) 
Samson, Gerardo F.,Jr. (Middle Philippines) 

General Administration/Judicial 
Administration 

Add: Muyepwe, Jacqueline Kjrupa (Southern Zaire) 

Global Ministries 

Remove: Clark, N. Jean (Memphis) 

Hopson, Esther E. (Western Pennsylvania) 
Pearce, Charles W. (Florida) 

Add: Archer, Anita K. (Memphis) 

Csemak, Eva (Hungary Provisional) 

Csernak, Istvan (Hungary Provisional) 

Green, William E. (Western Pennsylvania) 

Hong, Chong Shit (Singapore) 

Massey, Mary Alice (Florida) 

Roughface, Thomas (Okla. Indian Missionary) 

Timothy, Bankole (Great Britain) 



«l 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



33 



Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Remove: Roughfnce, TTiomas (Okla. Indian Missionary) 
Siazon, FYancisco M., Jr. (Northern Philippines) 

Add: Cueto, Hermenegildo J. (Northern Philippines) 

Katwebe, Mwenze (Southern Zaire) 
Mei, Juanita (China) 



Add: 



Independent Commissions 

Greenway, Harold E. (Western Pennsylvania) 



Local Church 

Add : Andre, Joaquim G. (Eastern Angola) 
Ntjjungu, Nkemba (Southern Zaire) 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

Remove: Jansson, Sven-Erik (Sweden) 
Add: Flores, Jose M. (Middle Philippines) 

FYansson, Ragne (Sweden) 





Organization of Standing Administrative Committees 


Time 


Committee 


Convenor 

Monday, May 4, 


Temp. Secretary 
1992 


Room 


10:00 a.m 


. Reference 


Carolyn M. MarshaU 


Odell Thompson 


101 


4:00 p.m. 


Agenda 


Carolyn M. Marshall 

Tuesday, May 5, 


John M. Brawn III 
1992 


101 


8:30 a.m. 


Calendar 


Carolyn M. Marshall 


John M. Brawn in 


101 


9:15a.m. 


Cor. Ed. Revision 


Ronald P. Patterson 


Carolyn M. Marshall 


Dressing Room A 


9:30 a.m. 


Presiding Officers 


W.T. Handy, Jr., 


Melanio Loresco 


200 


9:30 a.m. 


Court, and Privileges 


TTiomas Stockton 


Veronica McDaniels 


220 


9:46 a.m. 


Credentials 


Elias G. Galvan 


Roberto Gomez 


Show Office lA 


9:45 a.m. 


Jovirnal 


Onema Fama 


Odell Thompson 


101 



Organization of Legislative Committees 


Time Committee 


Convenor 


Temp. Secretary 


Room 




Monday, May 4, 


1992 




10:30 a.m. Central Conf. Affairs 


Emerito P. Nacpil 


Melanio Loresco 


205-206 




Tuesday, May 5, 1992, 4:30 p.m. 




Church and Society 


William B. Grove 


Fitzgerald Reist 


105-06 


Conferences 


Sharon Brown Christopher 


Roberto Gomez 


209 


Disdpleship 


Robert C. Morgan 


Yoshiro Befu 


107-108 


Faith and Mission 


Benjamin R. Oliphint 


John M. Brawn III 


212-217 


Financial Administration 


Roy I. Sano 


Veronica McDaniels 


207 


General/Judicial Administration 


Hans Vaxby 


J. Melvin Brawn 


210 


Global Ministries 


Forrest C. StUh 


Carolyn J. Hopkins 


110-112 


Higher Education and Chaplaincy 


Susan Morrison 


Melanio Loresco 


211 


Independent Commisions 


Ernest A. Fitzgerald 


Odell Thopson 


208 


Local Church 


William Lewis 


Millie HUts 


218-219 


Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 


Ernest T. Dixon, Jr. 


R.Preston Price 


201-202 



34 



May 5, 1992 



Alphabetical List of Voting Delegates 
and First Reserves 



Remove: Clark, N. Jean (Memphis) 

Hecker, Frigyes H.F. (Hungary Provisional) 
Hopson, Esther (Western Pennsylvania) 
Jansson, Sven-Erik (Sweden) 
Morrell, J. Darko (North Georgia) 
Rigler, Patricia A. (Western New York) 
Siazon, Francisco M., Jr. (Northern Philippines) 
Silva de Fuentes, Maria Elena (Mexico) 
Wladar, Antonia W.A. (Hungary Provisional) 



Add: Bigler, Patricia A. (Western New York) 

Csernak, Istuan (Himgary Provisional) 
Darko, Morrell J. (North CJeorgia) 
de Maldonado, Narcedalia B. (Mexico) 
Fransson, Ragne (Sweden) 
Caspar, Rufino C. (Northern Philippines) 
Handy, Doris M. (Western Pennsylvania) 
Sevems, Jerry G. (Memphis) 
Szabo, Andor S.A. (Hungary Provisional) 



Commission on Central Conference Affairs 



1. Agostinho, Victoria 

2. Benedyktowicz, Olgierd 

3. BoUeter, Heinrich 

4. Bretsch, Ronald 

5. Caldwell, Kirby John 

6. Chun, May 

7. Djundu, Lunge 

8. Eliasson, Ann-Marie 

9. Els, Albrecht 

10. Erana, Samuel 

11. EmKt, Sally 

12. Mattie Henderson 

13. Hearn J. Woodrow 

14. Heidler, Hartmut 

15. Hilton, David 

16. Huntington, Marilyn 

17. Katembo, Kainda 

18. Klaiber, Walter 

19. Knox, Lloyd 

20. Koo, Ronald 



21. Kulah, Arthur 

22. Larsen, Harold 

23. Lawson, David 

24. Magdowski, Axel 

25. Minnick, C. P. 

26. Minor, Ruediger 

27. Mutti, Fritz 

28. Nacpil, Emerito 

29. Nausner, Helmut 

30. Neeley, Betty 

31. Quee, David 

32. Rader, Sharon 

33. Renner, Joseph 

34. Roseler, Roland 

35. Sano, Roy I. 

36. Seymour, J. T.. 

37. Skeete, F. Herbert 

38. Tacadena, Elisabeth 

39. Vaxby, Hans 



General Conference Committees 



Committee on Agenda 

W. E. Arnold, Jr. 
James R. King 
Sarah S. Miller 
Donald A Ott 
Carlito S. Puno 
W. Franklin Summerour 



Committee on Calendar 

Beverly Abbott 
V.L. Daughtery, Jr. 
Charles W. Jordan 
Eldon B. Mahon 
Glenda C. Thomas 



t 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



36 



Committee on Courtesies 
and Privileges 

Phyllis Ferguson 
Donna L. Grubb 
Zan W. Holmes, Jr. 
Monica Lundgren 
Khin Khin Jensen 
Dolores B. Queen 

Committee on Credentials 

Napoleon Aragones 
Anita Iceman 
Joe Willie May 
Hector M. Novas 
Tal Oden 
J. La Von Wilson 



Committee on Presiding Officers 

David Dolsen 
Marcus C. Fang 
Sandra J. Ferguson 
Nancy K. Foster 
James E. Hunter 
Manfred Marquardt 
J. Allen Norris 
Gerardo F. Samson 
Robert Smith 
Vance Summers 
Peter Weaver 
Charles W. Williams 



Committee on Correlation 
and Editorial Revision 

Naomi G. Bartle, 2110 - 12th Street, North, Fargo, 
ND 58012 

Joseph Graham, 1632 Windermere Way, Cincinnati, 
OH 45224 

Hobart Hilyard, 9405 Woodward Avenue, Overland 
Park, KS 66212 

Earl W. Riddle, 465 N.W. 95th Avenue, Portland, 
OR 97229 

Book of Discipline Editor: Ronald P. Patterson 

Committee on Reference 

Arvin Luchs 
E. Keith Ewing 
Martha Forrest 
Anita 0. Fenstermacher 
Philip Granger 
Charles A. Holston 
June McCullough 
Helmut Nausner 
Song Ja Park 
Bette T. Trumble 
Nathaniel Turner-Lacy 
Erika M. Welti 
Rosa Washington 
Richard L. Wright 
Loretta A. Young 

Committee on Journal 

Randall C. Brock 
Alice Ann Glenn 
H. Sharon Howell 



Nominations to the Interjurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy 



North Central Jurisdiction 

Central Illinois 

Remove: Vemie T. Bamett 

Richard Reeves 
Add: Howard Daughenbaugh 

J. La Von Wilson 
West Ohio 



Add: Philip D. Brooks 

Caryl KriU 
Southeastern Jurisdiction 

Western North Carolina 
Remove: J. Lawrence McCleskey 
Add: Dolores B. Queen 



36 



May 5. 1992 



Tellers 



Group I 



Chief Teller: Stanley C. Sager (New Mexico) 
Reserve Chief Teller: Carolyn W. Morris (North Georgia) 



Section A 

Section Captain: Carmen Carrico (Desert Southwest) 
Reserve Section Captain: William D. Peeples 
(Louisiana) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-34 Margaret F. Knight (North Georgia) 
Rows 5-6-7 Shirley D. Hill (Southwest Texas) 
Rows 8-9-10-11 James Meadors (North Arkansas) 
Rows 12-13-14 Song Ja Park (California-Pacific) 
Rows 15-16-17-18 J. Neil Gunn (Mississippi) 
Rows 19-20-21 Bradley F. Watkins (Central lUinois) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-34 Donald W. Hamilton (Yellowstone) 
Rows 5-6-7 Nathaniel L. Bishop (Virginia) 
Rows 8-9-10-11 AlbrechtEls (German Southwest) 
Rows 12-13-14 Harriett J. Olson 

(Northern New Jersey) 
Rows 15-16-17-18 William H. Sadler, Jr., 

(Alabama-West Florida) 
Rows 19-20-21 Elizabeth B. St. Clair (Peninsula) 

Section B 

Section Captain: Rhymes H. Moncure 

(Missouri East) 
Reserve Section Captain: Marva Jean Hutchens 
(Mionesota) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Vance Summers, Jr. (West Ohio) 
Rows 4-5-6 Suella C. Barto 
(Central Pennsylvania) 
Rows 7-8-9 Carrol D. Newquist (Troy) 
Rows 10-11-12 Susan D. Sherbrooke 

(Pacific Northwest) 
Rows 13-14-15 Paul V. Marchbanks (Holston) 
Rows 16-17-18 Christine Xavier (Rocky Mountain) 
Rows 19-20-21 Joe N. Pevahouse (Memphis) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Sarah H. Miller (Wyoming) 
Rows 4-5-6 James H. Salley (South Carolina) 
Rows 7-8-9 Boh E. Waters (Texas) 
Rows 10-11-12 Judith Dye (Nebraska) 
Rows 13-14-15 Philip A. Amerson (South Indiana) 
Rows 16-17-18 Connie L. Mitchell (Kentucky) 
Rows 19-20-21 Margaret Ann WiUiams 

(Northern Illinois) 



Section C 

Section Captain: Ruth E. Harper (North Carolina) 
Reserve Section Captain: Catherine M. Dimlap ( 

East Ohio) 
Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Harold Yannayon 

(Western Pennsylvania) 
Rows 4-5-6 C. Garland Young 

(Western North Carolina) 
Rows 7-8-9-10 Barbara E. Jantz (Oklahoma) 
Rows 11-12-13 John D. Cooke (Western New York) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Bemice D. Johnson 

(North Carolina), 
Rows 18-19-20-21 Marcos V. Berbano, Jr. Oowa) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Phyllis R. Rodriguez (Wisconsin) 
Rows 4-5-6 Patricia A. Jarvis (West Virginia) 
Rows 7-8-9-10 Kelly Byron Bender (Kansas East) 
Rows 11-12-13 Phylemon D. Titus (Detroit) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Nancy G. Zabel (Baltimore) 
Rows 18-19-20-21 Olgierd Benedyktowicz (Poland) 

Section D 

Section Captain: James R. King (Tennessee) , 

Reserve Section Captain: Sandra F. Dufresne 

(Eastern Pennsylvania) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Oswald P. Branson, Sr. (Florida) 
Rows 4-5-6 WUliam B. Cook (Oregon-Idaho) 
Rows 7-8-9 Helen L. Rainier 

(Southern New Jersey) 
Rows 10-11-12-13 James J. Bryan (Missouri West) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Hattie Hamilton 

(Eastern Pennsylvania) 
Rows 18-19-20 Marion Muthiah (North Dakota) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Ann-Marie Eliasson (Sweden) 
Rows 4-5-6 Antti Mustonen (Finland-Finnish) 
Rows 7-8-9 Marvin B. Rosa (West Michigan) 
Rows 10-11-12-13 WilUam S. Hatcher 

(South Georgia) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Penney Schwab (Kansas West) 
Rows 18-19-20 Joseph J.K. Renner (Sierra Leone) 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



37 



Group II 



Chief Teller: Patricia A. Townsend (New York) 
Reserve Chief Teller: Jon R. Gray (Missouri West) 



Section A 

Section Captain: Charles W. Nicholson (Mississippi) 
Reserve Section Captain: Linda C. Marshall 
(Yellowstone) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-34 Wesley D. Williams 

(Southern New England) 
Rows 5-6-7 Beth Capen (New York) 
Rows 8-9-10-11 Margaret E. Tur fey/iU (Virginia) 
Rows 12-13-14 John T. Porter (Louisiana) 
Rows 15-16-17-18 Fred Trevino (Desert Southwest) 
Rows 19-20-21 Marine Allen (Little Rock) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-34 Joan G. Labarr (North Texas) 
Rows 5-6-7 W. J. Tiller (Southwest Texas) 
Rows 8-9-10-11 Helmut Nausner (Austria) 
Rows 12-13-14 Marvin Abrams (California-Pacific) 
Rows 15-16-17-18 Rhoda A. Peters (Louisville) 
Rows 19-20-21 Stephen R. Pacey (Central Illinois) 
Section B 

Section Captain: Arlene F. Wood (Alaska) 
Reserve Section Captain: Jean Henderson (Holston) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Donald C. Mintum (Wyoming) 
Rows 4-5-6 Debra A.S. Quilling (South Carolina) 
Rows 7-8-9 Robert M. Jackson (Texas) 
Rows 10-11-12 Donald G. Klarup (South Dakota) 
Rows 13-14-15 David L. White, Jr. (South Indiana) 
Rows 16-17-18 Jean Dowell (Minnesota) 
Rows 19-20-21 Victor L. Bonilla (Puerto Rico) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Caryl Krill (West Ohio) 
Rows 4-5-6 Sharonn D. Halderman 

(Central Pennsylvania) 
Rows 7-8-9 Julius Archibald (Troy) 
Rows 10-11-12 Randall C. Brock (Red Bird) 
Rows 13-14-15 Jiros Mafbndokoto (Zimbabwe) 
Rows 16-17-18 Rodney D. Anderson 

(Rocky Mountain) 
Rows 19-20-21 Beverly Abbott (Maine) 



Section C 

Section Captain: Janet E. Stephenson (Iowa) 
Reserve Section Captain: Joseph L. Harris (Oklahoma) 

Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Christine A. Bethke (Wisconsin) 
Rows 4-5-6 Betty S. Gk)rdon (West Virginia) 
Rows 7-8-9-10 Jerry D. Holliday (Kansas East) 
Rows 11-12-13 Stephen T. Euper (Detroit) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Bernard Keels (Baltimore) 
Rows Id- 19-20-21 Esther J. Angel (East Ohio) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Paul J. Meuschke 

(Western Penngylvania) 
Rows 4-5-6 Roberta E. Blackwell 

(Western North Carolina) 
Rows 7-8-9-10 Harold D. Nixon (Northwest Texas) 
Rows 11-12-13 Peter F. CAen (California-Nevada) 
Rows 14-15-16-17Dorothy Luckert (Southern Illinos) 
Rows 18- 19-20-2 IZ). Min. Armin E. Besserer 

((Jierman South) 

Section D 

Section Captain: Kermit 0. Burrous (North Indiana) 
Reserve Section Captain: Charles W. Pearce (Florida) 
Regular Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Delia Escareno (Rio Grande) 
Rows 4-5-6 Beth O. Benham 

(North Central New York) 
Rows 7-8-9 Alice Fleming (West Michigan) 
Rows 10-ll-12-13</a7nes H. Rush (South Georgia) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Sue E. Davidson (New Hampshire) 

Rows 18-19-20 Barbara E. Harper (North Alabama) 

Reserve Tellers 
Rows 1-2-3 Thomas Roughface 
(Oklahoma Indian) 
Rows 4-5-6 Loreto G. Lazaro 

(North Central Philippines) 
Rows 7-8-9 Theo W. Schaad (Switzerland-France) 
Rows 10-11-12-13 Jeannie Trevino-Teddlie 

( Central Texas) 
Rows 14-15-16-17 Katharine W. Lehman 

(North Indiana) 
Rows 18-19-20 Velma Bunch (Tennessee) 



38 



May 5. 1992 



Petitions to the 1992 General Conference 



The following is a list of 2,433 petitions that the sec- 
retary of General Conference has forwarded to the Com- 
mittee on Reference for its review and referral to 
appropriate legislative committees. Abbreviations and 
the petition code may be found on pages 1017-1018 of 
Advance Edition n. 

This list is sorted in alphabetical order by source. 
Petitions from individuals are sorted by last name, peti- 
tions from local church groups are sorted by the local 
church name, and petitions from annual conferences 
and conference committees are sorted by the annual 
conference abbreviation. Petitions from multiple 
sources are sorted by the first source listed on the peti- 
tion, or the source of the first petition received in the 
case of duplicate petitions. 

GM-12226-8000-R Native American Religious Freedom Act of 
1978. Marvin B. Abrams, Native American UidC, Norwalk, CA. 

GM-12277'«7S6-D Constitution of District United Methodist Men. 
David C. Adams -H 12 Other Individuals. Bellevue UMC, Nashville, TN. 

FA-122164000-R Financial Support for Country and Rural 
Churches. Administrative Board, Addison UliC, Maine Conference, 
MA. 

HE-12280-1S19-D Institutional Affiliation with The United 
Methodist Church. 12 Local Church Administration/Boards + 54 Ind. 

LC-11171-0216-D Baptism and Confirmation. Administrahve 
Board, 4 local church groups + 1 individual. 

FM-10O40-0O71-D Human Sexuality. Retain Para. 7 IF. 
Administrative Boards, Clapps, Normandale, First, Rev. Freeman + 96 
Individuals, Corryton, TN. 

FA-11667-S0OO-R General Board of Pensions. Conference Board of 
Pensions and Home Claimants, AFL. 

LC-10182-0106-D The Sacrament of Baptism. AJ1„ CTX. 

FA-10SS4-S000-R Retain Budget Request at Level Funding. AFL, 
KEN, NMX, SCA, LRE, CTX. 

CS-10108-8000-R Oppose the Promotion and Distribution of 
Pornography. AFL 

CS-10967.S0OO-R4 Commission on Alcohol and Drugs. AFL 

C8-10988-8000-R Letter Writing Campaign Regarding Health 
Care. AFL 

GJ-lOOeO-0806-D Membership on Program Boards. AFL 

GJ-1012e-2S21-D Chargeable Offenses. AFL 

CO-11648-0704-D Business of the Conference. Theodore L 
Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

GJ-11S68-1001-D Continue the Genera] Council on Ministries. 
Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

IC-11674-2101-D Continue the General Commission on Religion 
and Race. Theodore L Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

IC-11676-2401-D Continue in the World Methodist Council. 
Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

IC-11676-2402-D Continue Membership in CCUIC, NCCC and 
WCCC. Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

IC-12227-S00O-R Adopt 'Toward an Ecumenical Future". 
Theodore L. Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

MN-11691-0609-D Termination of Office. Theodore L Agnew, 
First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

MN-11698-0680-D Responsibility of Pastors and Clergy. Theodore 
L Agnew, First UMC, Stillwater, OK 

MN-12289-0404-D The Ordained Ministry. Theochre L Agnew, 
First UMC, Stillwater, OK. 

CO-10598-OeeO-D Organizations of a Missionary Conference. 
AKM. 

FA-10S88-07S7-D Proportional Payments for Pastoral Support. 
AKM. 

GJ-104S8-0810-D General Agency Membership. AKM. 



CS-12S06.0716-D Abortion and the Nurturing Community. Adm. 
Bd + 3 Other Local Churches + 85 Individuals, Aldersgate UMC, 
College Station, TX. 

MN-12898-0402-D Human Sexuality. Adm. Council + 568 
individuals -\- 127 groups, Aldersgate UMC, Dobbs Ferry, NY. 

CS-11268-8000-R Stewardship of Creation. Council on Ministries, 
Alplaus UMC, Alptaus, NY. 

CS-1242(VS000-R Oppose Support for the Freedom of Choice Act ct 
1991. Administrative Council, Alva UMC, Alva, FL 

CS-1242&«00O-R Regarding SUte-By.State Legislation Regarding 
Abortion. Administrative Board, Alva UMC, Alva, FL. 

MN-11790-8000-R Council of Bishop Theological Deliberation on 
Abortion. Administrative Council, Alva UMC, Alva, FL 

FM-I2SS9-0071-R Human Sexuality. Administrative Council, 
Amboy UMC, WV. 

DI-1 1469-8000-R Object to Removing the Word 'Taith" from the 
Book of Worship. William and Marlene Ambrose, First UMC, Parsons, 
WV. 

HE-11488-1580-D Purpose cf the Schools of Theology. Robert L 
Anderson, WOB. 

HE-11489-1SS1-D Schools of Theology. Robert I^ Anderson, WOH. 

CS-11294-S00O-R The Appalachian Mission. Appalachian 
Development Committee. 

CS-11826-S00O-R Increase Commitment to End World Hunga 
and Poverty. Appalachian Development Committee. 

CS-11820^00O-R Homeleesnees in the USA. Appalachian 
Development Committee. 

CS-11827-8000-R Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse. 
Appalachian Development Committee. 

FA-1107ft-2558-D RequiremenU of Trustees of Church 
Institutions. Appalachian Development Comm-ittee. 

FA-11482-8000-M$ Church Wide Study of Clergy Salary and 
Support Structure. Appalachian Development Committee. 

GM-11857-8000-R Church and Community Workers. 
Appalachian Development Comm-ittee, Hagerstown, MD. 

IC-11859-07SS-D Conference Archives and History. Archives and 
Sistory, Silver Springs, MD. 

IC-11809-SOOO-R Election of Local Church Historian. Ark. Area 
Joint Commission on Archives and History, Arkansas. 

CO-11846-Oeil-D Resolutions and Positions Adopted by the 
General Conference. Administrative Board, Aroma, Laton UMC, 
Bucky Turk and Mr & Mrs. Geyer, Laton, Miamisburg OH and St 
Bryan, TX, CA. 

C8-1194(M00O-R The Oxford House Model for Drug and Alcohol 
Abuse. Administrative Council, Asbury UMC, Prairie Village, KS. 

FM-12866-0071-D Human Sexuality. Administrative Council and 
Members, Ashford UMC, Houston, TX. 

CO-11807-fl726-D Annual Conference Council on Ministries. 
Association of Physically Challenged UM Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

CO-11810.S000-R Americans with Disabilities Act. Association of 
Physically Challenged UM Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

CS-11810>8OOO*R Accessibility of Parsonages and Churches. 
Association of Physically Challenged UM Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

FA-11881-8000-R Accessibility Grants to Local Churchee. 
Association of Physically Challenged UM Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

MN-11808-0608-D Open Itineracy and Handicapping Conditions. 
Association of Physically Challenged UM Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

MN-12261-8000-M Judicial Administration and Procedures. 
Hardin L. Atkins, IB, NMX. 

FA-11079-8000-R Relocation of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. Charles W. Avery, AFL 

LXM1169-0106-D Baptismal Regeneration. Charles W. Avery, 
AFL. 

CO-11468-0704-D Business cf the Annual Conference. Sue Avery, 
Christ UMC, Kettering, OH. 

CS-1241S-0071-D Abortion. Administrative Council, Avon UMC, 
Ml Vernon, WA. 

CS-11920-0071-D The Scientific Community. George E. Bailey, 
EOH. 

C8-119214)07ft.D Our Social Creed. George E. Bailey, BOB. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



39 



DM192S-1201-D The Purpose of the General Bowd of 
Diseipleehip. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DI-11824-1202-D Reepcneibilities of the General Board of 
Diecipleehip. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DM1826-1207-D Educational Reeponaibilitiee of the General 
Board of Diedpleship. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DI-11926-1212-D Responsibilities of the General Board of 
Discipleehip/Evangelism. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DI-11827-1214-D Worship Responsibilities of the General Board of 
the General Board of Diseipleehip. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DI-11928-12ie-D Devotional Life Responsibilities of the General 
Board of Diecipleship. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

DI-1192&-1228-D The Curriculum Resources Committee. Oeorge 
E. Bailey, EOH. 

FM-119S2-00e&-D The Present Challenge to Theology in the 
Church. Oeorge E. Bailey, EOH. 

OM-119tS-1402-D Reeponsibilities of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. George E. Bailey, EOH. 

LC-1 1885-0202-D The Local Church. George E. BaUey, EOH. 

LC-1198e-02e8-D The Church School. George B. Bailey, EOH. 

CO-11192-0726-D Conference Council on Ministries. George W. 
Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, K3. 

C8-11196-8000-R Socially Responsible Investment Guidelines. 
Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

CS-11196-8000-R Loi7 Intensity Conflict. George W. Baldwin and 
Reu. James D. Uhlig, Central UMC. Kansas City, KS. 

DI-11197-1202-D General Board of Diseipleehip. George W. 
Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

DM1198-1806-D United Methodist National Youth Ministry. 
Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FA-11184-1604-D General Authorization of the General Board of 
Pensions. George W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FA-1120O4)709-D Reeponsibilitiee of the Conference Council on 
Finance and Administration. Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, 
Kansas City. KS. 

FA-11204-090e-D General Council on Finance and 
Administration. Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FA-1120S-1604-D General Board of Pensions. George W. Baldwin, 
Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FA-11206-1608-D Conference Board of Pensions. George W. 
Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FA-11207-2612-D Annual Conference Property. Oeorge W. 
Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

GJ-1 1212-081 6-D PoUcies Relative to Socially Responsible 
Investments. George W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

OJ-1121S-1000-D General Council on Ministries. Oeorge W. 
Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

GM-1121K-1402-D Duties of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. George W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

GM-11216-1411-D Policies of investment of the General Board of 
Global Ministries. George W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

HE-11217-0782-D Responsibilities of the Conference Board of 
Higher Education and Campus Ministry. Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central 
UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

HE-11219-lSOe-D Duties of the General Board of Higher 
Education and Campus Ministry. Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, 
Kansas City, KS. 

HE-11220-1518-D Responsibilities of the University Senate. 
Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

LC-1 1227-024 7-D Promotion of Policies Relative to Socially 
Raq>onsible Investments. Oeorge W. Baldwin, Central UMC, Kansas 
City, KS. 

LC-11229-26S2-D Local Church Property. George W. Baldwin, 
Central UMC, Kansas City, KS. 

FM-12S40^)071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. Linda Bales + 
S Ad Boards + S individuals, Ohmer Park UMC, Dayton. OH. 

CS-12801-S00O-R Defining the Beginning of Life. James Curtis 
Ballard, First UMC, Euless, TX. 

CS-124104)071-D Abortion. James Curtis Ballard, First UMC, 
Euless, TX. 

FM-1287(V800O-R Adoption of the Minority Report of the 
Commission to Study Homosexuality. James Curtis Ballard, First 
UMC, Euless, TX. 

LC-1187S-0246-D Staff-Parish Relations Committee. Dulaney 
Barrett, NMX. 



MN-12119-0481-D Qualifications for Ordination. Dulaney Barrett, 
NMX. 

FM-11818-S000-R Baptism and Confirmation. A. Z>ulim«y 
Barrett, NMX. 

MN-118824M22-D Members in Full Connection. R. Dulaney 
Barrett, NMX. 

MN-12897-0402-D Human Sexuality. Jean Barthel, Mt Orab 
UMC, Bethel, OH. 

CO-11116-060ft.D Election of Bishops. Beta Barto, Reading, PA. 

LC-12179-0224-D Baptized Children Retained as Preparatcry 
Members. Arlinda P. Baszner, St Luke UMC, Kokomo, IN. 

FA-11S66-0710-D Clergy Support Budgets. Jim Beat, Little Rock, 
AR. 

FA-11867-0718-D Plan and Method of Clergy Support. JimBeal, 
Little Rock, AR. 

FA-1 1808-0719-0 Clergy Support. Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

FA-118e8-0720-D Determination of the Pastor's Salary . JimBeal, 
Little Rock, AR. 

FA-11870«721-D Claim for Unpaid Salary. Jim Beal, LiUle Rock, 
AR. 

FA-11S71-0722-D Commission on Equitable Salary. JimBeal, 
Little Rock, AR. 

FA-11872-0724-D Reporting of IVavel and Other Expenses. Jim 
Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

FA-1187S-0726-D Compensation for Clergy Appointed Beyond the 
Local Church. Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

FA-11876-0907-D National Association of Commission on 
Equitable Salariee. Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

LC-11274-0244-D The Administrative Council or Administrative 
Board. Jim Beal, NAK 

LC-11891-0247-D Compensation of the Pastor and Other Staff 
Appointed by the Bishop. Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

LC-11894-02&6-D Reconunendation of Pastor's Compensation to 
Charge Conference. Jim. Beal, Litde Rock, AR. 

LC-11896-0269-D Pulpit Supply and Proposal for Compensation. 
Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. 

MN-11400-0818-D Maintain Compensation of Pasters. J'l/n BeoJ, 
Little Rock, AR. 

MN-11412-0408-D Compensation Established by the Annual 
Conference for Full time Local Pastors. Jim Beal, NAK. 

MN-11418-0414-D Qualification for Election to Probationary 
Membership. Jim Beal, NAK. 

MN-11417-0441-D Support for Ordained Ministers Appointed to a 
Pastoral Charge. Jim Beal, NAK. 

MN-1141S^>446-D Sabbatical Leave ftr Ordained Ministers. Jim 
Beal, NAK 

MN-11419^>449-D Maternity/Paternity Leave. </im Beoi, AMil 

MN-11421-0461-D Retirement of Ordained Ministers. JimBeal, 
NAK 

MN-11428-0628-D Reeponsibilitiee of District SuperintendenU. 
Jim Beal, NAK 

IC-12106-0788-D Duties of the Conference Commission on 
Archives and History. Marvin Bean, WOH. 

OJ-12276-2e21-D Chargeable Offenses. Christi Beasley, Indian 
River City UMC, Titusville, FL. 

GJ-12220-0821-D Meetings Open to News Media. Lewis H. 
Beckford, MNE. 

C8-11SS8-8000-R Condemn All Sexual Acts Outside Marriage. 
AdminXstradue Board, Bedford UMC, Bedford, PA. 

C8-12422-8000-R Take a Stronger Stand Against Abortion. 
Administrative Board, Bedford UMC, Bedford, PA. 

FM-11566-8000-R Reaffirm our United Methodist Doctrinal 
Position. Administrative Board, Bedford UMC, Bedford, PA. 

FM-12862-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. 
Administrative Board, Bedford UMC, Bedford, PA. 

HE-llS71-ie80-D Accountability of the Theological Schools. 
Administrative Board, Bedford UMC, Bedford, PA. 

QJ-12184-0004-C Inclusivenees of the Church. Dorothy Bedwell, 
First UMC, Morehead City, NC. 

GM-1227e-0742-D Establish a Conference United Methodist Men 
Organization. David C. Adams + 25 Other Individuals, Bellevue UMC, 
NashvilU, TN. 

LC-12281-0264-D Support Scouting Ministry. David Adams ■¥ 26 
Other Individuals, Bellevue UMC, Nashville, TN. 



40 



May 5, 1992 



LC-12282-0268-D Cocrdinator of Scouting Ministry. David C. 
Adam* + 24 Other Individuals, Bellevue UMC, Nashville, TN. 

LC-1228S-02eS-D Coordinator of Scouting Ministry. David C. 
Adams + 24 Other Individuals, BeUevue UMC, Nashville, TN. 

FA-1228a4000-R R«tireee Defined Benefit Program. 80 Members 
of the Benefit Program. 

OJ-12S21-S000-R Conference Adjudicatory Board. Teodoro 
Bernardo, Central UMC, Manila, Philippines. 

MN-1282&Oei8-D LimiUtions on Years of Service fcr a D.S. 
Teodoro Bernardo, Central UMC, Manila, Philippines. 

HN-12S88-068S-D Confirmation of AppointmenU. Teodoro 
Bernardo, Central UMC, Manila, Philippines. 

C8-11862-0071-D Death with Dignity. Z>aie £. £e3<, C/L 

CS-1186S-0072-D RigfaU of Children. Dale B. Best and Ward 
Boyd,CIL. 

CS-11864-0078-D Abstinence of Gambling. Dale E. Best and 
WardBoyd, CIL. 

CS-11S66-0074-D Criminal Justice and the Political Community. 
Dale E. Best and Ward Boyd, CIL 

FM-12S75-S0OO-R Human Sexuality. Administrative Council, 
Bethany UMC, Middletown, OB. 

DI-11822-S000-R All Inclusive Language. Administrative Board, 
Bethldiem UMC, Thornton, PA. 

aj-llS46-8000-M$ Task Force to Study Ways to Resolve 
Ideological Disputes. Pastor and Memho's, Bethlehem UMC, 
Thornton, PA. 

HE-11868-8000-R Feminist Theology. Administrative Board, 
BethUhem UMC, Thornton, PA. 

MN-1127ft-04S6-D Support Pastoral Appointments for a Minimum 
of Four Years. Administrative Council, Big Springs UMC, Lecompton, 
KS. 

C8-11611-0072-D Media, Violence and Christian Values. Bishop's 
Task Force for Responsible Media and Administrative Board Green 
Memorial UMC, Richmond, VA. 

CO-llMft«W0-R Affirmation of Zoar UMC of Philadelphia. 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal Dayton, OB. 

C8-11907-8000-R Human Intervention: No Military Involvement. 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

CS-11908-8000-R Comprehensive Health Care. Black Methodist 
for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

CS-119O9-S00O-R Care Giving Tean» fcr Aids Victims and Their 
Families. Black Methodist for ChurA Raiewal, Dayton, OB. 

DI-1191O-S0OO-R Advisory/Coordinating Committee on Older 
Adults. Black Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

DI-11811-8000-R Black Leadership. Black Methodist for Church 
Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

FA-11912-S000-R4 Historically Black Colleges Related to the 
UMC and the Black College Fund. Black Methodist for Church 
Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

OJ-1191S4000-R Black Church Growth. Black Methodist for 
Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

GJ-1I914-SO0O-R Ethnic Membership on Boards and Agencies. 
Black Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

GJ-1191S-80OO-R Ethnic Local Church Concerns. Black 
Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

GJ-119ie-<000-R Strengthening the Black Church fcr the 2lBt 
Century. Black Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

OH-11917-S00O-R National Plan for Hispanic Ministries. Black 
Methodist for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

HE-11918-S0OO-R Africa Univ^sity. Black Methodist for Church 
Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

IC-11919-8000-R Sexism and Suppo^ COSROW. Black MeOiodist 
for Church Renewal, Dayton, OB. 

IC-11 ieS4000-R Eradication at Language that Promotee 
Divisiveness, Segregation or Racism. Donald E. Blair, Cliftondale 
UMC, College Park, OA. 

IC-118aS-S0OO-R Adopt Consultation on Church Union's Plan. 
Comm. on Christian Unity and Interrdigious Cone, BLT, PNW. 

MN-I2061-S000-M$ Task Force to Study Ways to Address the 
Concerns of Pastoral Care and Counseling. Pastoral Care and 
Counseling Corn-mission and G.C., BLT. 

CS-1221O-S0OO-R Terrorism Peace with Justice Task Force Bd. of 
Church and Soc, BLT. 

IC-118aO-1812-D Add Cox Memorial United Methodist Church, 
Hallowall, MA. United Methodist Bistorical Society. BLT. 



LC-11874-0247-D Electionof a Church Historian. United 
Methodist Bistorical Society, BLT. 

MN-10161-O402-D Accepting Practicing Homosexuals into the 
Ministry. BLT. 

CS-11667-S00O-R Violence in our Society. Administrative Bofird, 
Blue Valley Memorial UMC, Manhattan, KS. 

HE-12278-1617-D Membership and Organization of the 
University Senate. 10 Local Church Adm. Boards/Councils + 47 Ind. 

GJ-lliaS4000-R Termination of United Methodist Members 
Membership in the Masonic Lodge. Charles R. Bolyard, Mercer, PA. 

FA-11O78-S0OO-R General College and Mission University Fund. 
Rebekah Bolyard, Mercer, PA. 

FM-12M2-S00O-R Reject the Recommendation to Develop Study 
Materials on Homosexuality. Administrative Council, Boone Bill 
UMC, Summeruille, SC. 

MN-lOOSO-OSOe-D Nomination fcr the Episcopacy. Seth P. Bower, 
WPA. 

MN-101 70-06 17-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. Reu. 
Richard Bowyer. 

CS-12000-8000-R Gun Control Ronald E. Bowyer, WVA. 

FM-10786-8000-S Report of the Baptism Study Committee. BPSC. 

GJ-11806-0000-C Eligibility cf all United Methodist Members to 
Vote in General and Special Elections. John R. Brawthen, Asbury 
UMC, Minneapolis, MN. 

FA-11S16-0921-D Ministerial Education Fund. David W. 
Breeden, VIR. 

CS-1115S-0071-D Support the Present Statement Regarding 
Abortion. Administrative Board Bright Star UMC, Atlanta, GA. 

DI-11169-S0OO-R Inclusive Language. Adminij^ative Board, 
Bright Star UMC, Atlanta, GA. 

CS-12264-S000-R Labeling of Intoxicants. Church and Society 
Work Area, Broadmoor UMC, Shreveport, LA. 

CS-12S14-S000-R Pornography. Church and Society Work Area, 
Broadmoor UMC, Shreveport, LA. 

CO>11791-0e07-D The Appointment Process. Charles A. 
Brockwell, Jr., LVL 

CO-11794-0012-D Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
Charles W. Brockwell, Jr., LVL 

CO-1 1796-0620-0 Authority of the College of Bishops of a 
Jurisdiction. Charles W. Brockwell, Jr., LVL. 

CO-11796-0628-D Jurisdicticoal Committee on Episcopacy. 
Charles W. Brockwell, LVL 

CO-12086-0618-D The Jurisdictional Conference. Charles W. 
Brockwell, LVL. 

MN-11884-0062-C Episcopal Siqiervision. Charles W. Brockwell, 
Jr., LVL 

CS-12168-S0OO-R Drug and Alcohol Concerns. £Uen Bro<iertdt -I- 
13 Individuals, Metropolitan Memorial UMC, Washington, DC. 

CO-11060-00S7-C Provision fcr Annual Conference Reporting of 
Delegates. Lonnie D. Brooks, EastAnt^orage UMC, Anchorage, AK- 

CO-1 1424-001 0<; The Constitution ofThe United Methodist 
Church on the Status of Annual Conference. Lonnie D. Brooks, Bast 
Anchorage UMC, Anchorage, AK. 

GJ-11086-0802-D Strengthen General Council on Ministries' 
Supervisory role. Lonnie D. Brooks, East Anchorage UMC, Anchorage, 
AK 

GJ-11 087-261 6-D Access to Judicial Council. Lonnie D. Brooks, 
East Anchorage UMC, Anchorage, AK 

GJ-1 1 162-0826-0 LimiUtion of Boycotte. Lonnie D. Brooks, East 
Anchorage UMC, Anchorage, AK 

CO-1146S-00Se-C Duties of the Annual Con&rence. Lonnie D. 
Brooks, East Anchorage UMC, Anchorage, AK 

LC-11871 -0227-0 Affiliate and Associate Membership. David W. 
Brown, WOB. 

LC-11872-0260-O Care of Members. David W. Brown, WOB. 

LC-12180-0262-D Maintain Accurate Membership Rolls David 
W. Brown, WOB. 

LC-11868-0216-D Admission into the Church. Donald W. Brown, 
WOB. 

MN-11688-8000-M$ Terms of Episcopacy Leadership. Charles M. 
Bryan, TEN. 

DI-11618-0277-D Lay Speakers. Donald L Buege, WMI. 

OI-11769-0278-D Certified Lay S^jeaker. DonoWi. Buege. WW/. 

FA-126ie-0906-D Financial Reeponsibilitiee. Finance Committee, 
Burnt BiUs UMC, Burnt BUU, NY. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



41 



Th« Ministerial Education Fund. AUUon 

Relocation Acroee District Boundaries. Allison 

The Black College Fund. Alliton Cambre, TBX. 
Admission into the Church. Alliaon Camhre, 

Membership Records and Reports. Alliaon 

Program Agencies. Allison Cambn, TEX. 
Continuation of Candidacy. Allison Cambre, 

Categories of Local Pastors. Allison Cambre, 



Classification of Ordination. Allison Cambre, 

The Itinerant System. Allison Cambre, TEX. 
Bishops in Central Conference. Alliaon 



FA-116O8-800O-R Ministerial Pension Plan. Lorraine B. Burt, 
First UUC, Olympia, WA. 

MN-1 1 1S1-0461-D Effective Date of Retirement for Ordained 
Ministers. Billy Id. Cadtn. NCA. 

CO-1169S-0607-D The Assignment Process of Bishops. Aitiaon 
Cambre, TEX. 

FA-1160(MW21-D 
Cambre, TBX. 

FA-12029-2620-D 
Cambre, TEX. 

FA-120S0.4000-M 

LC-120S&.O210-D 
TEX. 

LC-12087.02S2-D 
Cambre. TEX. 

LC-12OS»«20S-D 

MN-11SM-0406-D 
TEX. 

HN-116W-0408-D 
TEX. 

MN-1 1686-0420-D Requirements for Election as an Associate 
Member. Allison Cambre, TEX. 

MN-11687-0448-D Leave of Absence. Allison Cambre, TEX. 

MN-11690-0468-D Base of Complainta. Allison Cambre, TEX 

BfN-lieSS-0437-D Transfers from Other Methodist 
Denominations. Allison Cambre, TEX. 

MN-116S4-04S9-D Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor. Allison 
Cambre, TEX. 

MN-12044-04S8-D 
TEX. 

MN-12046-0487-D 

MN-12O47-0S12-D 
Cambre, TEX. 

LC-11446-2640-D Local Church Property-Sale, Transfer, Lease, cr 
Mortgage. Conference Commission on Religion and Race, CAP. 

LC-1144e-2eS0-D Study of Local Church Potential. Conference 
Comjnission on Religion and Race, CAP. 

C8-1 1427-SOOO-R Comprehensive Teet Ban Treaty. Peace with 
Justice Committee, CAP. 

FM-100044)071-D Human Sexuality. Amend para. 71 F. CAP, 
SNB. CNV, mrK. 

CS-10288-8000-R Forced Contraceptive Use and Sterilization. 
CAP. 

C8-10S48-S000-R< Anniversary Edition cf "The Bishops Call fir 
Peace and the Self-Development of Peoples'*. CAP. 

FA-10299-2612-D Landmark Policy. CAP. 

OJ-10122-0810-D Conference Nominating Committee. CAP. 

IC-10862-SOOO'R Continue the Commission of Religion and Race 
and Continue Status Role of Women. CAP. 

MN-10174-0786-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy. CAP. 

CS-11612-S000-R Developing a National Consensus fcr Clergy 
and Laity. Methodists United for Peace with Justice, Capitol UUC, 
Washington, DC. 

LC-1117(M>113-D A£Ermation and Stress of Clergy. John A. Carr 
and Nancy J. Webb, Association of Physically Challenged UM 
Ministers, Wallingford, CT. 

FM-128«(M)071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. Herman Y. 
Carr, New Brunswick UMC, Bridgewater, NJ. 

LX7-11102-2648-D Planning and Financing Requirements fcr Local 
Church Buildings. John A. Carr and Nancy J. Webb, Association of 
Physically Challenged UM MinisUrs, Wallingford, CT. 

LC:-1117ft«2e»-D Accessibility of Faeilitiee. John A. Carr and 
Nancy J. Webb, Association of Physically Challenged UM Ministers, 
Wallingford, CT. 

DI-12267-122S-D Curriculum Resources Review Committee. 14 
Local Church Oroupa + 48 Individuals, Carroll UMC, Carroll, OH. 

CU-12272-2a21-D Chargeable Offenses. Shalom Ministries + 29 
Local Church Groups + 24B Ind, Carroll UMC, Carroll, OH. 

FM-12090-00e8-D Ecumenical Commitment. Riley Case, NIN. 

FM-12091-00a9-D The Doctrinal Statement. Riley B. Case, NIN. 

FM-12082-800O-M The Study on Baptism Report. Riley B.Caae, 
NIN. 

FM-12088-S000-M Study on Baptism R«i>ort. Riley B. Case, NIN. 

OJ-114MM>806-D Additional Membership on General Program 
Boards. Riley B. Case, NIN. 



OJ-11481-0810-D Osneral Agency Membership. Aifay A Co**, 
NIN. 

MN-11602-1629-D ReeponsibiUtiea of the Division of Ordained 
Ministry. Riley B. Case, NIN. 

DM1604-S000-R Amendments to the Proposed Book of Worship. 
Riley B. Case, SL Luke UMC, Kokonw, IN. 

MN-11901-0618-D Limitations on Tears of Service. Robert T. 
Casey, Newport News, VA. 

DI-1017fr4000-S United Methodist Book of Warship. CBOW. 

FA-llMS-SOOO-R The Propoeed Budget From OCFA 
Adjninistrative Council, Centenary UMC, Cape Girardeau, MO. 

GJ-1194e-<0OO-M$ Create Commission to Study Structure of 
Boards and Agencies. Administrative Council, Centenary UMC, Cape 
Girardeau, MO. 

UN-11886-0S09-D RightsofDiaconal Ministers. Atfmims^aA'M 
Council, Centenary UMC, Cape Girardeau, MO. 

LC-12040-026S-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
Administrative Board, Central Park UMC, Birmingham, AL. 

DI-11616-S0OO-R God Language in the Book of Worship. 
Administrative Board, Central Terrace UMC, Winston Salem, NC. 

FA-11617-S000-R Reduction in Budget and Bureaucracy. 
Administrative Council, Central Terrace UMC, Winston Salem, NC. 

FM-11619-OOee-D Doctrinal Accountability. Administrative 
Council, Central Terrace UMC, Winston Salem, NC. 

FM-12a28-S000-R No Further Funds for a Study Committee 
Regarding Homosexuality. Administrative Council, Central Terrace 
UMC, Winston Salem, NC. 

LC-11629-0221-D Baptism and Confirmation. Administration 
Board, Central Terrace UMC, Winston Salem, NC. 

CS-12417-0071-D Belief in Sanctity of the Unborn. 
Administrative Board, Central Terrace UMC, Winston-Salem, NC. 

C8-12404-0071-D Include the Durham Declaration in Paragraph 
71. Administrative Council, Central UMC, Laurinburg, NC. 

FM-12878-0071-D Human Sexuality. Administrative Board, 
Central UMC, Toledo, OH. 

MN-128824M02-D Human Sexuality. DeleU para. 402.2. 
Administrative Board, Central UMC, Toledo, OH. 

CO-ll(>a74>eil-D The Book of Reeolutions Up-Dating. Christ 
UMC and Adm. Bd Shiloh UMC, Goshen, KY, Florence, KY. 

CO-11779-O701-D Voting RighU for Deaconesses. Church and 
Community Workers National Organization, Berea, KY. 

GM-11784-1418-D Voting Rights for Deaconeeeee. Church and 
Community Workers National Organization, Berea, KY. 

LC-11787-0206-D Cooperative Parish Ministries. Church and 
Community Workers National Organization, Berea, KY. 

BfN-11788-06S2-D Criteria in the Appointment Making Process. 
Church and Community Workers National Organization, Berea, KY. 

IC-118ei-S00O-M$ Task Force to Study Racism and Sexism Rural 
Churches and Institutions. Church and Com.munity Workers National 
Organization, Berea, KY. 

MN-11864-S00O-R Considering Community Contexts in the 
Appointment Making Process. Church and Community Workers 
National Organization, Berea, KY. 

FA-12892-090e-D Human Sexuality. Administrative Council, 
Church of the Cross, Toledo, OH. 

LC-11U7.O20S-D Full Membership in The United Methodist 
Church. Administrative Board, Church Street and First UMC Atlantic 
Beach, NC, Knoxville, TN. 

LC-11U&420&-D Membership of a Local United Methodist 
Church. Administrative Board, Church Street UMC and Dorothy 
Bedwell, KnaxvilU, TN. 

OJ-11S2M)004-C Inclusiveness of the Church. Administratiue 
Board, Church Street UMC, Knoxville, TN. 

CO-10117-070S-D Accountability fcr Church Membership. CIL 

CS-10SeS-<000-R SUtement on Abortion. CIL. 

DI-10297-0eS6-D Jurisdictional Committee on UMM. CIL. 

DI-10298-1222-D Men's Work Responsibilities. CIL. 

OJ-1080»-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. CIL. 

IC-10S14-0741-D Establish an Annual Conference UM Men 
Organization. CIL. 

MN-10S76-04SO-D Voluntary Family Leave. CIL. 

C8-121SS-S000-R Aids Education. IS Members Theological 
Dimensions Class, Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, CA. 

CO-11797-S000-R Information on the Status of Business During 
the General Conference. Zack Clayton, Epworth UMC, Columbus, OH. 



42 



May 5, 1992 



DM 0696-0000-0$ Establish a Committee on OMa- Adult 
Ministries. CNV + 13 Other Annual Conferences. 

HE-10849-S000-R Higher Education Training and Scholarships. 
CNVandNAK 

MN-11S4S-0462-D Clergy Who Fail to Submit Annual Reports. 
Bd. of Ordained Ministry and the Bishop's Cabinety CNV. 

FA-1288S-090e-D Affirm Full Participation of Gays and Lesbians 
in the church. 323 Clergywomen of the United Methodist Church, CNV 
and other Conferences. 

FM-13877-0071-D Human Sexuality. 323 Clergywomen of the 
United Methodist Church, CNV and other Conferences. 

LC-11814-0262-D0 Removal of Local Church Officers. Conference 
Cabinet and San Jose District COM.. CNV. 

FM-1019ft4)072-D Rights of Lesbians and Gay Men. CNV, GBCS. 

6M-10441-S0OO-R National Plan for Hispanic Ministries. CNV. 
NMX, CAP, DSW, NCA, PEN. 

MN-10288-0404-D The Moral and Social Reeponsibility of 
Ordained Ministers. CNV, NY K. 

MN-10624-0402-D Ordination or Appointment of "Self-Avowed" 
Practicing Homoeeiuals. CNV, NYK 

C8-10988-8000-R Health Care Service for All Persons. CNV. 

DI-108e7-S000-R4 Resources and Materials for Families of 
Incarcerated Pereons. CNV. 

DM060S-8000-R African American Family Life. CNV. 

FA-10882-S000-R Student Local Pastor Enrollment in the 
Con^rehensive Protection Plan. CNV. 

GJ-10974-8000-R Study and Celebration of Native American 
People. CNV. 

LC-10221-0208-D Celebrating the Diversity of Church Members. 
CNV. 

MN-10268-0460-D Extended Family Leave. CNV. 

MN-1098O-OS04-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. CNV. 

MN-10981-0404-D The Certified Candidate. CNV. 

MN-10982-0414-D Qualification for Election to Probationary 
Membership. CNV. 

MN-1098S-0120-D Requirements for Election as an Associate 
Member. CNV. 

MN-10984-0424-D Requirement for Admission to the Ministry. 
CNV. 

MN-10986-0481-D Qualifications for Ordination. CNV. 

MN-1128O400O-R Pastor/Clergy/Chaplain Consecrated Through a 
Ceremony of Laying on of Hands. Lawrence P. Coates, West Derfield 
UMC, Fostoria, MI. 

LC-10144-0269-D Chairperson of Committee on Nominations and 
Personnel. Flora Thompson Cobb, Edenton Street UMC, Raleigh, NC. 

FA-11825-0906-D Fiscal Responsibilities. Administrative Board, 
Coker UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

MN-12824-0068-C Episcopal Supervision. Lelia Shore 
Commander, First UMC, Cory, NC. 

CO-10002-0606-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. Amend para. 606.1 & 
2 So. Central Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy, SDA. 

CO-11808-0608-D Petitions to General Conference. Committee on 
Plan of Organization and Rules ofOrd, Delaware, OH. 

FM-1200e-S000-M Oppose Elimination of Confirmation. 
Administrative Board, Community UMC, Belle Glade, FL. 

1X7-1 1688-2648-D Planning Requirements for Local Church 
Building. Committee on Persons with Handicapping Conditions, 
Community UMC, Dayton, OH. 

CO-10015-0088-C Ministerial Delegates to General, Jurisdictional 
and Central Conferences. Administrative Council, Community UMC, 
Wrightwood, CA. 

LC-10072-0252-D The Administrative Council: Membership and 
ReeponsibiUtiee. Administrative Council, Community UMC, 
Wrightwood, CA. 

GJ-12224-8000-R Adopt "Peace with Justice as a Special 
Program". Church and Society Committee, Concord UMC, Athens, WV. 

LC-111244)2e8-D Guidelines for the Church Library. Lois M. 
Cone, First UMC, Okeechobee, FL. 

DI-1200S-8000-M Publish a Youth Devotional. Conference 
Council on Youth Ministries, Sr High UMYF, Hartford, SD. 

DI-11768-0277-D Lay Speaking. Conway District Council on 
Ministries, Conway, AR. 

DI-11760-0278-D Lay Speaker. Conway District Council on 
Ministries, Conway, AR. 



DI-11761-0279-D Church Lay Speaker. Conway District Council 
on Ministries, Conway, AR. 

LC-11682-2689-D Incorporated Local Church Property. W. 
Vernon and Shirley Cook, First UMC + 13 individuals, Chula Viaia, 
CA. 

CS-11699-0072-D Rights of Children. Beth A. Cooper, New 
Wilmington, PA. 

MN-11841-0068-C Limiting the Bishop's Tenure. JackM.Copas, 
NJY. 

MN-11848-0468-D Reconunendation to Administrative Location. 
Jack M. Copas. NJY. 

C8-11818-0074-D Military Service. John Copenhaver, Jr., VZR. 

MN-1189»4)000-D Limit Tenure for Bishops. Jack M. Copus, NJY. 

FA-12172-0787-D Membership of the Conference Board of 
Pensions. Delos Corderman, SCA. 

MN-1145O4J000-R The office of District Superintendent. Edward 
M. Cotten, AFL. 

CC-1099e.OO80-C Episcopal Administration in Central 
Conferences. Council of Bishops. 

CC-10996-0627-D The Accredited Representative of the Council of 
Bishops. Council of Bishops. 

CC-10997-0047-D Concordat Agreement with an Autonomous 
Methodist Church. Council of Bishops. 

CC-10998-0648-D AfBliated Autonomous Methodist Churches. 
Council of Bishops. 

CC-1099frO660-D Establishing A Covenanting Church. Council 
ofBishops. 

CO-11000-0606-D Bishops in Jiu'isdictions. Council ofBishops. 

CO-11001-0606-D Episcopal Nomination and Election. Council of 
Bishops. 

CO-11002-0507-D The Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 
Assignment Process. Council ofBishops. 

CO-11008-0701-D Composition and Character of Clergy 
Membership of an Annual Conference. Council of Bishops. 

CO-12062-0607-D The Assignment Process. 16 Members of The 
Council ofBishops. 

CO-12068-0612-D The Jurisdictional Conference. 16 Members of 
The Council ofBishops. 

CO-12064-0620-D The Committee on Episcopacy. 16 Members of 
The Council ofBishops. 

00-12066-0628-0 Duties of the Jurisdictional Committee on 
Episcopacy. 16 Members of The Council ofBishops. 

FA-11004-0787-D Proportional Retirement Payments. Council of 
Bishops. 

GJ-11006-0606-O Nominations iar Membership to General 
Agencies. Council ofBishops. 

GJ-11000-0814-O Process for General Board Sta£f Positions. 
Council ofBishops. 

GJ-11007-S00O-R The Global Nature of the United Methodist 
Church. Council ofBishops. 

GJ-llOOS-SOOO-R Continuation of the Present Special Stmdays. 
Council of Bishops. 

IC-11009-8000-R Pan Methodist Unity and the Consultation of 
Methodist Bishops. Council ofBishops. 

IC-11010.8000-R The UMC and Churches in Covenanting 
Communions. Council ofBishops. 

MN-11011-0406-O Rights of Local Pastra-8. Council of Bishops. 

MN-11012-0407-O Licensing as a Local Pastor. Council of Bishops. 

MN-11018-040S-O Course of Study for Ordained Ministry. 
Council of Bishops. 

MN-11014-O409-O Educational Requirements for Continuance as 
a Local Pastor. Council ofBishops. 

MN-11016-O412-O Action on Granting Status Regarding License, 
Ordination or Conference Membership. Council ofBishops. 

MN-11016^>489-O Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor. 
Council of Bishops. 

MN-1 1017-0442-0 Appointments Beyond the Local United 
Methodist Church. Council ofBishops. 

MN-11018-0608-D Vacancy in the Office of Bishop. Council of 
Bishops. 

MN-11019-0509-O Termination of Office. Council of Bishops. 

MN-11020-0610-D Status of Retired Bishops. Council of Bishops. 

MN-11021-0612-D Bishops in Central Conferences. Council of 
Bishops. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



43 



MN-11022-0618-D Review IVoeeaa in Involuntary Termination of 
Office. Council of Bishops. 

MN-11028-S000-R Reeponee to the Study of Ministry. Council of 
Biahopa. 

MN-1206e-0062-C Episcopal Supervision. 16 Member) of The 
Council of Bishops. 

MN-120e74)06S-C Episcopal Supervision. 16 Members of The 
Council ofBishops. 

GM-12268-1404-D The Budget of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. 10 Members ofCouenant UMC, Covenant UMC. 
Oaithersburg, MD. 

C8-110e7-S000-R The Sanctity of Pre-bom Human Beings. 17 
members, CPA. 

PM-11084-S000-R Support Present Statement Regarding Baptism 
and Membership. Members, CPA. 

1X7-1 1S9(M)280'D Re-classification to a Member to Inactive. Perry 
C. and Margaret T. Crandall, First UMC, Vancouver, WA. 

OJ-liei8-080S-D Membership of Program Boards. 
Administrative BoardJCounciU Crawford UMC, Mobile, AL. 

MN-11900-0618-D Limitation on Years of Service. James R. 
Crook, Jr., FLA. 

CO-lOfill-0701-D Composition and Character of the Annual 
Conference. CSMN. 

MN-10462-0O0O.D The Ministry of Deacon. CSMN. 

MN-104eS-0S02-D The Nature of Diaconal Ministry . CSMN. 

MN-104e4-O808-D Entrance into Diaconal Ministry. CSMN. 

MN-10466-0804-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. CSMN. 

MN-1046ftO806-D Completion of Candidacy. CSMN. 

MN-10467-0807-D Consecration of Diaconal Ministers. CSMN. 

MN-1046S-O80O-D Rights of Diaconal Ministers/Deacons. CSMN. 

MN-1O409-OS1O-D Service Appointment of Diaconal Ministers. 
CSMN. 

MN-1 04 700811-0 Credentials and Records. CSMN. 

MN-10471-0812-D Transfer to Another Conference. CSMN. 

MN-10472-O818-D Change in Conference Relationship. CSMN. 

MN-10478-081S-D Relationship to the Employing Agency. CSMN. 

MN-10474-0818-D Office of Deaconeee. CSMN. 

MN-1047S-O81&-D Eligibility to Become a Deacon. CSMN. 

MN-1047*0000-D Reorder Chapter Three. CSMN. 

MN-10477-O401-D Ministry in the Christian Church. CSMN. 

MN-10478-0429-D Ordination and the Apostolic Ministry. CSMN. 

MN-10479-(M80-D The Purpose of Ordination. CSMN. 

MN-10480-04S1-D Qualifications for Ordination. CSMN. 

MN-1 0481-0482-D The Act of Ordination. CSMN. 

MN-10482-0488-D The Order of Elder. CSMN. 

MN-1O188-O406-D Authority and Duties of a Local Pastor. CSMN. 

MN-10484-0408-D Categoriee of Local Pastor. CSMN. 

MN-1048(M>40S-D Continuance as a Local Pastor. CSMN. 

MN-1048e«412-D General Provisions. CSMN. 

MN-10487-O418-D Eligibility and Rights of Probationary 
Membership. CSMN. 

MN-10488-0414-D Qualification for Election to Probationary 
Membership. CSMN. 

MN-1048S-000O-D Educational Requirements. CSMN. 

MN-10490-000OD Educational Requirements. CSMN. 

MN-10491-O424-D Admission to the Order of Elder and Full 
Membership in the Annual Conference. CSMN. 

MN-10492-O428-D Rights and Responsibilities. CSMN. 

MN-10498-O42e-D Ordained Ministers from Other Conference and 

Other Denominations. CSMN. 

MN-10494-O427-D Clergy Members from Other Denominations. 
CSMN. 

MN-10486-0447-D Ordained Ministers Seeking a Change in 
Conference Relationship. CSMN. 

MN-1049ft«448-D Leave of Absence. CSMN. 

MN-10487-0449-D Maternity/Paternity Leave. CSMN. 

MN-1049»«46OD Disability Leave for Clergy. CSMN. 

MN-104804>4S2-D Certificateof Honorable Location. CSMN. 

MN-1060O0109-D Diaconal Ministry. CSMN. 

MN-10601-O264-D Membership of the Administrative Board. 
CSMN. 

MN-10S02-02e8-O The Conunittee on Nominations and Personnel. 
CSMN. 

MN-1060S-0616-D Presidential Duties of Bishops. CSMN. 

MN-10604'OSie-D Working with Ordained Ministers. CSMN. 



MN-10606-0617-D Working with Deacons. CSMN. 

MN-10606-0619-D Responsibilities of District Superintendents. 
CSMN. 

MN-10607-0684-D Process of Service Assignments of Deacons. 
CSMN. 

MN-10608-06S6-D Consultation and Review. CSMN. 

MN-10fi09-0S8a-D Connectional Responsibility. CSMN. 

MN-10610-0687-D Frequency of Appointment and Service 
Assignments. CSMN. 

MN-10ei2-0708-D Powers and Duties of the Annual Conference. 
CSMN. 

LC-10222-0216-D Admission into the Church by Baptism and 
Confirmation. CTX. 

LC-1022S-0224-D Baptism and Confirmation of Children in the 
Church. CTX. 

LC-10224-0225-D Baptism and Confirmation of Children in the 
Church. CTX. 

MN-10286-0807-D Consecration to the Office of Diaconal Minister. 
CTX. 

C8-11249-0074-D The Political Community and Government 
Leaders. William Lcuuaon Culver, Harper Chapel UMC, Osage Beach, 
MO. 

CC-11066-S00OR Creation ofa Zaire Central Conference. CZA. 

GM-11440-1402-D Reeponsibilitiee of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. Janice Dahl, TWA. 

GJ-11187-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. Administrative Board, 
Dalraida Charge of Montgomery District, Birmingham, AL. 

FM-12887-3000-R ObUgation and Responsibility of the General 
Conunission on Finance and Administration. Administrative Beard, 
Daniels Memorial UMC, Goldsboro District, NC. 

MN-11447-0461-D Charge Conference Membership. Frank P. 
Dannelly, CAP. 

CC-10S42-8000-R Organize the Present Four German Annual 
Conferences into one Central Conference. DDR, GNW, GSO and 03W. 

CC-11069-800OR Recognition and Representation of the 
Deaconess Association. Deaconess Association, Paniqui, Tarlac, 
Philippines. 

CS-11666-800OM The Church Takes a Stand on Moral Issues. 
Evelyn L. DeLong, Calvary UMC, Circleville, OB. 

LC-11S78-0221-D Service of Baptism and Dedication. Evelyn L. 
DeLong, Calvary UMC, Circleville, OH. 

LC-11276-O207-D Chairperson of the Committee on Nominations 
and Personnel. Lois DeSantis, Good Samaritan UMC, Edina, MN. 

CO-11188-0606-D Number of Bishops in Jurisdictions. DBT 
Conf, NCJ Committee on Episcopacy + 6 Ind. 

CO-10188-070e-D Rights of Local Pasters in the Annual 
Conference. DETandMOE. 

FA-I147e-S000-R Table the Denominational Health Care Plan to 
the 1996 General Conference. Conference Board of Pensions and 
Insurance, DET. 

FA-11477-8000-R Denominational Health Care Plan. Conference 
Board of Pensions and Insurance, DET. 

CO-11281-0088-C Ministerial Delegates to Gaieral, Jurisdictional 
or Central Conferences. National UM Rural Fellowship Legislative 
Committee, DET, MEM. 

CO-10179-0612-D Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
DBT. 

CO-1018S-0701-D Composition and Character of Annual 
Conference. DET. 

CO-10601-800OR Delegates Expenses to General Conference. 
DBT. 

C8-10194-0071-D Abortion. DET. 

FA-10199-0721-D Equitable Salaries. DET. 

6J-10207-0276-D Rural Life Sunday. DET. 

OJ-10211-2e28-D Investigation Procedures. DET. 

OM-10688-800OM$ Study of Rural Community. DET. 

OM-10689-8000-R Affu-mation of Basic Rural Worth. DET. 

LC-1022K-0244-D Organization and Administration. DET. 

LC-10226-0244-D Local Churches Administrative Councils. DET. 

LC-10227-024&-D Basic Organizational Plan for the Local Church. 
DET. 

LC-10281-0268-D$ Administrative Committees. DBT. 

MN-10289-O40e-D Authority and Duties of Local PaBtors. DET. 

MN-10240-0408-D Categories of Local Pastors. DET. 



44 



May 6. 1992 



HN-10241-O412-D Clergy Membership of Annual Conference. 
DET. 

MN-10242-0419-D Eligibility and Ri^s of Associate Members. 
DET. 

MN-1024S-0419-D Associate Members of Annual Conference. 
DET. 

MN-10266-0788-D Duties of the Board of Ordained Ministry. 
DET. 

MN-1 0267-0762-0 Compoeitionof District Committee on 
Ordained Ministry. DET. 

MN-10S24-0451-D Retired Ordained Ministers. DET. 

MN-1087ftO461-D Charge Conference Membership. DET. 

MN-10626-S0OO-R Pastoral Lettw on Economic Justice. DET. 

CO-10184-0701-D Associate and Affiliate Clergy Members of 
Annual Conference. DEX. 

00-10186-0701-0 Local and Part-time Pastors Right to Vote. 
DEX. 

CO-10186-0701-D Local Pastors and a Full-time Appointment 
Rights to Vote at Annual Conference. DEX 

FA-10202-0806-D Funding "Gay" Caucus on Groups. DEX. 

MN-10246-0424-D Requirements fcr Admiseion into Membership 
for Annual Conference. DEX 

MN-10249-O48e-O AppointmenU of Ministfrial Members. DEX. 

MN-10260-0487-D The Itinerant System. DEX. 

MN-10264-0468-D Grievance Proceduree and ComplainU. DEX 

MN-10269-0684-D Making Frequency Appointment. DEX. 

MN-1201»-0816-D Relationship to the Employing Agency. 
Diaconal Ministers of Oregon-Idaho Conference, Portland, OR. 

CO-1166O4000-MI Study the FeasibiUty of Holding Biennial 
Regional Annual Conferences. Norma Dobler, First UMC, Moecow, ID. 

MN-1160S-S000-R Vision, Mission and Restructuring of the 
United Methodist Church. Frank L. Dorsey. KSB. 

DI-11072-8000-R Establish Preferred Language to Describe God. 
Colleen Douglas, New Castle UMC, New Castle, KY. 

MN-10147-O80&-D Rights of Diaconal Ministers. Alvin B. Dove; 
St James UMC, Pleasant Valley UMC, VA. 

CO-10041-4)0S6-C Composition of Annual Conference. DownsUlle 
UMC. Downsville, LA. 

CO-10MS-008S-C Voting Righto of Annual Conference. 
Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

CO-10047-0701-D Voting Righto of Ministerial Members of 
Annual Conferences. Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

CO-11061-00S8-C Lay Delegates to Gena-al, Jurisdictional or 
Central Conferences. Adrtiinistrative Board, Downsville UMC, 
Downsville, LA. 

FA-10109-07l'l-O Apportionments. Administrative Board, 
Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

FA-1107e-260S-D Trust Clauses in Deeds. Administrative Board, 
Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

FA-11077-800O-R Institute a Different Plan for Ministerial 
Compensation. Administrative Board, Downsville UMC, Downsville, 
LA. 

FM-1288&4000-R Oppose Ordination of Avowed Homosexuals. 
Administrative Board, Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

MN-10082-O428-D Voting Righto of Members of Annual 
Conference. Administrative Board, Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

MN-10086-0448-D AfBliate Relations to Annual Conference. 
Administrative Board, Downsville UMC, Downsville, LA. 

MN-1114&-0000-C Ordination, Appointment, Re-appointment or 
Election to Office of Homosexuals. Administrative Board, Downsville 
UMC, Downsville, LA. 

CS-12ie7-0076-O Military Fcrce Guided by the Standards 
Expressed in the Church's IVadition. Philip M. Dripps, NIL 

GJ-10871-800O-R Stewardship of lime and Money of General 
Boards and Agencies Meeting. DSW. 

6J-10978-8000-R Quadrennial Emphasis on Ministries with 
Persons with Disabilities. DSW. 

MN-10979-0108-O Special Variation in the Order of Deacon. 
DSW. 

FM-12864-8000-R Report of the Committee to Study 
Homosexuality. Alvin Dunn, Floral Heights UMC, Wichita Falls, TX. 

CO-1164(M)611-0 Removal of Time Dated Material. MaMe 
Dunnam, MEM. 

CO-11641-0706-D Annual Conference Journal. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 



DI-11642-06S2-D Jurisdictional Youth Ministry Organization 
Convocation. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

DI-11S4S-1807-D Memb«^hipcf the National Youth Ministry 
Organization. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-11S44-0904-D Amenability of the General Council on Finance 
and Administration. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-11046-0906-D Consultanto to the Executive Committee. 
Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-11O46-O0OO-D Budget Recommendations. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 

FA-11647-0907-O Administrative Responsibilities. Maxie 
Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-11648-0911-D General Policies of the General Council on 
Finance and Administration. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-11649-0912-D The World Service Fund. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 

FA-11660-0918-D World Service Special Gifts. Maxit Dunnam, 
MEM. 

GJ-lia8a-1001-D The G^ieral Council on Ministries. Maxie 
Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11661-0914-D The Advance. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11662-0274-D Church-mde OSeringi. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11668-0802-O Accountability and Evaluation of General 
Agencies. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11664-0808-D General Council on Finance. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 

6J-1 1666-0806-0 The Jurisdictional Pool. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-lie67-0810-D Representation on General Agencies. Maxie 
Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11668-081S-O TheGeneralSecretary of Program Agencies. 
Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-11669-0814-D Dutiee of the General Secretary of General 
Council on Finance and Administration. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

GJ-lieeO-1007-D The Advance Committee. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 

HE-11661-1608-D Amenability and Accountability of the Board. 
Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

IC-11662-1904-D Accountability and Reporting. Maxie Dunnam, 
MEM. 

IC-11668-1907-D Membership of the Commission on 
Communication. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

IC-11664-1908-D Financial Needs of the Commission on 
Communication. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

IC-11666-2008-O Responsibilities of General Commission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

IC-11666-2204-D Authority and Powers. Ma^e Dunnam, MEM. 

10-11667-2208-0 Staff of the Commission cf the Status and Role of 
Women. Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

MN-11668-0627-O Council of Bishops. Jifaxie Dunnam, AfEif. 

GJ-11666-0806-D Additional Members of Program Agencies. 
Maxie Dunnam, MEM. 

FA-12270-0921-D Repayment of Service Loans. Russell East, LVL. 

CS-12206-8000-R English as the Official Language of the U.SA. 
Verna K. Echols, Lake Wales, FL. 

OO-11284-062S-O The Jurisdictional Committee en Episcopacy. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

OO-11846-060S-O Focus of Petitions to General Conference. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

FA-11828-0710-O Budget of the Conference Council on Finance 
and Administration. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

GJ-11881-262(VD Annual Conferenoe Judiciary Committee. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

GJ-11882-2624-D Voting on Specifications of Charges. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 

GJ-1188S-2626-0 The Response of the Appeals Cotirt. Jerry 
Bdtert, WIS. 

GJ-11S84-2627-D Financial Responsibility of the Conference upon 
Acquittal of a Pastor Under Charges. Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

GJ-11886-2628-D Impeachment of Judicial Council Members. 
Jerry Eckert, WIS. 

GJ-11882-2601-O Election of Judicial Members. Jerry Sc/ier^ 
WIS. 

GJ-11888-2622-0 Requirement of a Vote on Specification. Jerry 
Eckert, WIS. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



46 



OJ-114S»-3a24-D Reporting an Audit cfAllCorts of THaJs. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

OJ-lieaS-2a21-D Administrative Haraaament as a Chargeable 
Offense. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

OJ-llS24-2e24-0 Trial Procedures. Jerry BcJuri WIS. 

OJ-11B20-800O-R EsUblishmant of an Impartial Panel to Review 
Personnel Cases. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

OJ-11948-S000-R Reoompense for Rev«rend Gordan Johnson. 
Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

OJ-119494000-R Reoompense for Reverend Dr. William Gandy. 
Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

LC-11100-0107-D Eipression of Love of God and Neighbor in our 
Churches. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-111O4-O402-D Relations of Ordained Ministere to the Ministry 
of All. Jerry Edtert, WIS. 

MN-11106-0601-D The Nature of Supcrintendency. Jerry Eekert, 
WIS. 

MN-11109-0604-D Offices of Bishops and District 
Superintendents. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11110.4624-D Non-personnel Reqjonsibilitiee of District 
Superintendents. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11111-0629-D Aoeountability of District SuperintendenU. 
Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11114-0SSS-D The Appointment Making Process. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11SO<V0754-D Purpose of the Committee on District 
Superintendency. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11818-0447-D Change of Confarence Relationship for Full, 
IVobationary and Associate Members. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11S22-07S5-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

MN-llS42-044«-D Clarification ofthe Leave of Absence. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

MN-llft98-4)00O-D Mediation as a IVocees of Reconciling. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11416-044O-D Prohibiting Private Onfr«n-on« Pastoral Care. 
Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-11422-04fift-D Grievance Procedures. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

MN-llSSS-OOOO-D The Appointment Making Procees. Jerry 
Eekert, WIS. 

MN-124SS.O402-D Listing of Comparable Sins with 
Homoeexuality. Jerry Eekert, WIS. 

GJ-115264000-R RecoDTense for a Widow. Jerry £c/i«rt W7S. 

CS-1241 1-0071 -D Abortion. Margaret & Richard Eddy + 37 other 
endorteri, Simms, Uontana UUC, Oreat FalU, UT. 

MN-1181MM4S-D Leave of Absence of Ordained Ministers. Frank 
Edward; Donald Haynea, Charles D. White Jr., WNC. 

GM-1186»<000-R Affirmation ofBasic Rural Worth. Wanda 
EiehUr, Pint UUC, Pigeon, MI. 

FM-11664-S000-R Amendment to the Baptism Study. Carolyn P. 
Eliae, Oraee UMC, Jaekeonville, IL. 

CO-11117-0a02-D Composition ofthe Voting Membership of 
General Conference. Hap ElioMn, TEN. 

FA-11121-2618-D Board of Church Location and Building. Hap 
Bliaton, TEN. 

FA-11S01-2618-D Authority of the Board of Church Location and 
Building. Hap Eliaeon, TEN. 

LC-1181S-2627-D Fair Share of Property in a Realignment 
Charge. Bap Eliaeon, TEN. 

MN-llia6-0S2S-D Realignment of Churches. Hap S^ioson, TSjyr. 

MN-11462-8000-M« Study for the Office of District 
Superintendency. Floyd Emfinger, AFL. 

L£-10142-026»-D Responsibility of Local Lay Leader. EPA. 

1X7-1 0622-02fil-D Duties ofa Lay Leader. EPA. 

MN-10172-07SS-D Orientation for New Members of Board of 
Ordained Ministry. EPA. 

MN-1017(M>7S2-D District Committee on Ordained Ministry. 
EPA. 

CO-1219ft«008-D Provide Senders the SUtus of their Petitions 
and Resolutions Submitted to General Council. Adult Education CUut, 
Bpworth UMC, Columhue, OH. 

DI-12S07-8000-R Rerject the New God-Language Being Proposed. 
Adm. Board + 104 local church group* + 37 pertane, Eeeex UMC, 
Riehumod, OH. 



CO-11698-S000-R Individual Delegate Votes at General 
Conference to be Recorded and Published. Evangelical Pellowthip, 
Richmond, VA. 

IC-12009-1900-D Responsibilities of the Commission on 
Communication. Exec. Committee ofthe OA Communication* Council, 
Atlanta, OA. 

LC-12012-0247-D The Church Historian. Exec. Committee of the 
OA Communicationa Council, Atlanta, QA. 

LX:;-1201S-0262-D The Work Area on Evangelism. Exec. 
Committee ofthe QA Communicationt Council, Atlanta, GA. 

LC-12014-0257-D The Council on Ministries. Exec Committee of 
the OA Communieatiom Council, Atlanta, QA. 

LC-1201S-02eO.D The Work Area Chairperson. Exec Committee 
ofthe GA Communicationa Council, Atlanta, GA. 

LC-120ie-0262-D The Coordination of Communications. Exee. 
Committee ofthe GA Communicationa Council, Atlanta, OA. 

C8-12421-S0OO-M The United Methodist and Abortion. Olga 
Fairfax, Wheaton, MD. 

FA-122Sa-0726-D Shared Salary Options. Adminiatratiue Board, 
Fairview UMC, Washington, WV. 

CS-11610-0071-D Death with Dignity. Adminialrative Board, 
Faith UMC, Bryan, OH. 

FM-1287lt-0071-D Human Sexuality and Ministry. 
Adminiatrative Boards, Falling Creek and Brogden UMCs, Dudley, NC. 

CS-12414-0071-D Regarding Abortion. Adminiatrative Board, 
Falling Creek UMC, Dudley, NC. 

FM-llSae-8000-M The Continuance of Confu-mation. 
Adminiatrati.ve Board and Wilbur C. Teachey, Farmville UMC, 
Farmuille, NC. 

CS-1147S-0072-D Righte of the Unborn. Deniae Fennell, Windfall 
UMC, Windfall, IN. 

IC-1149O-200S-D ResponsibilitieeofGCCUIC. Deniae Fennell, 
Windfall UMC, Windfall, IN. 

CS-11822-8000-R The Political Community. Charles J. Ferris and 
Eddie Carter Jr. 

GJ-1217K-2a07-D Responsibility ofthe Judicial Council. Dauid M. 
Finch, NJY. 

OJ-12176-2612-D Duties ofthe Judicial Council. Dauid M. Finch, 
NJY. 

FA-12292-8000-R Relocate in Accord with Findings by Study 
Committee Site Selected by End of 1994. Adminiatrative Board + 6 
Individuala, First and Gray UMC, Knoxville, TN. 

FA-11802-S000-R Apportioned General Funds for the 1993-1996 
Quadrennium. Administrative Board, First and St Paul UMCs, 
Rosutelt and Las Crueea, NM. 

MN-12482-8000-R Reject Ordination of Homoeexuals as Ministers. 
Adm~ Bda.A members of First ofLaPorte, Prospect, Hillsboro, Osgood A 
Aberdeen UMCs, LaPorU, IN. 

LC-11177-8000-R Infants as Full Members Before Confirmation. 
Administrative Board, First and Myrtle Orove UMCs. 

FA-112eS-0S21-D The Ministerial Education Fund. 
Administrative Board, First UMC +21 other local church groups A 60 
ind., Blackwell, OK. 

FM-12818-0071-D Reject the Adoption of the Report on 
Homoeexuality. First UMC +11 local church groups + 6, Individuala, 
Cocoa, FL. 

GJ-11271-2e21-D Chargeable Offenses. Adminialrative Board, 
First UMC + 6 other UMCs, Cireleville. OH. 

HE-lia72-161ft-D Purpoee and Objectives ofthe Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry. Administrative Board, First UMC +11 local 
church groups + 53 individuals, Blackwell, OK. 

GM-11887-1404-D The Budget ofthe General Board of Global 
Ministries. Board of Stewards, First UMC and Grafton Preaaley, 
Griffin, QA. 

OJ-11S80-1001-D Eliminate General Council on Ministriea. Bd 
of Stewards, Adm. Board and WMI Bd. Evangeliam, Firal UMC and 
Qroeabeek UMC, Oriffin and Cincinnati, QA, OH A MI. 

DM14e6-1224-D Curriculum Resource Materials. First UMC of 
Ml Vernon, IL+ 3 other local groups. 

FA-11081-8000-R Relocation ofthe General Board of Global 
Ministries. Adminialrative Board, First UMC, St Andrews UMC, 
Pensacola, FL, Niceuille, FL. 

OJ-11088-800O-R Mandatory Quotas on Boards and Agencies. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, St Andrews and Myrtle Grove 
UMC, Niceuille and Pensacola, FL. 



46 



May 5, 1992 



C8-10Ol(MK)71-D Conflicts of Life That May Justify Abortion. 
AdminUtrative Board, First UMC, Abilene, TX. 

FM-10018-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend para. 7 IF. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Abilene, TX. 

FM-10019-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend para. 7 IF. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Abilene, TX. 

MN-10160-O402-D Homosexuals in the Ministry. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, AbiUne, TX 

FA-11264-8000-R Support Relocation of the General Board of 
Global Ministries. Charge Conference, First UMC, Atlanta, TX 

CS-11246-0071-D Decisions Concerning Abortion. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Blackwell, OK 

FA-11266-8000-R Optional Enrollment of Full-time Employees of 
Local Churches in the Church's Medical Insurance. Charge 
Conference, First UMC, Brevard, NC. 

CS-12022-0000-D Pornography Issues. 168 Members + Genesis 
Sunday School Class, First UMC, Claremore, OK 

CS-11561-0071-D The Nurturing Community and Divorce. 
Sunday Seekers Sunday School Class, First UMC, Fairport, NY. 

FM-128S7-S00O-R Oppoee Developing Study Materials for the 
Church Regarding Homosexuality. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
FL Walton Beach, FL. 

LC-11S79-0280-D Care a! MeinberB. Adminittrative Board, First 
UMC, Gadsden, AL. 

GJ-11522-0805-D General Agency Membership. Board of 
Stewards, First UMC, Griffin, GA 

GJ-11947-S000-R Management Consultant to Evaluate the 
General Boards and Agencies of the Church. Lay Delegates, First 
UMC, Houston, TX. 

FM-118064>071-D Retain the FVeeent Statement on Marriage. 
Administrative Council, First UMC, Jay, OK 

FA-122e8-0906-D Quadrennium Budget. Administratiue Board, 
First UMC, Knoxville, TN. 

FA-11820-O9O6-D Budget Not to Exceed Previous Quadrennium 
Receipts. Lafayette United Methodist Women, First UMC, Lafayette, 
OB. 

FA-12291-S000-R Relocate to Houston Texas. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Longview, TX. 

FA-12294-S0OO-R Relocate the General Board of Global Ministries 
Within One Year After End of General Conference. Administradve 
Board, First UMC, Longview, TX 

MN-10026-0451-D Mandatory Retirement Age of Ministers. 
Amend para. 461.6. Adult Senior Sunday School Class, First UMC, 
Monticello, FL. 

CO-11466-OeiO-D Speaking for the Church. 7 local church 
groups. First UMC, N. Vernon, LL 

GJ-11482-2621-D Chargeable Offenses. First UMC, N. Vernon, 
IN, Groesbeck UMC, Cincinnati. 

CS-10089-O071-D Abortion. Amend para. 7 1-G. Administrative 
Board, First UMC, Niceville, FL 

GJ-110S8-S00O-R Two Quadrennia (1992-2000) Enqihasis on 
Building New Churches. Administrative Board, First UMC, Niceville, 
FL. 

GJ-1109(V.S00O-M$ Study to Streamline the Church Boards, 
Agencies and Committees. Administrative Board, First UMC, 
Niceville, FL 

CS-122S6-8000-R A Plan to Provide Housing for the Homeless. 
UniUd Methodist Women, First UMC, Santa Monica, CA. 

LC-10187-0280-D Removal of Names from Membership Role. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Scotisboro, AL. 

00-11604-0012-0 Delegate Selection to General Conference. 
Administrative Board, First UMC, Tavares, FL. 

LC-116804)2S0-D Care of Members. Church Annual Charge 
Conference, First UMC, Vancouver, WA. 

PA-11877-S00O-R Recommends a Budget Increase of no mere than 
0% fcr the 1993-1996 Quadrennium. FLA, and Herndon and Lakeside 
UMCs, Hubbard, TX. 

FA-lOSeS-SOOO-R Substitute "Connectional" Ministry Giving for 
the Word "Apportionments." FLA, NGA and SDA. 

CO-10101-0610-D Speaking for the Church. FLA. 

FA-10066-0710-D World Service Apportionments. FLA. 

FA-10197-0710-D World Service and Conference Benevolences 
Budget. FLA. 

FA-11884-S00O-M$ Council of Bishops Appoint Study Committee 
on Apportionments System. FLA. 



CS-1178O-S0OO-R Investment Ethics. Robert Flin, RKM. 

LO-11141-0227-D Affiliate and Associate Memba-ship. Rudolph 
Flood, EPA. 

LC-11142-0246-D General Provisions for Honorary Members. 
Rudolph Flood, EPA. 

LO-11144-0260-D Responsibilities of the Administrative Board. 
Rudolph Flood, EPA. 

Dl-I14e7-S000-M Continued Use of the Traditional Language. 
Council on Ministries, Fort Hill UMC, Lynchburg, VA. 

CS-I2424-8000-R Population Relating to Abortion. G. D. & 
Melanie Fox and Taskforoe for Abortion, Parkview UMC, Miamisburg, 
OH. 

CS-11466-S000-R Withdraw Faithful Witness Booklet &om 
Circulation. George and Melanie Fox, Parkview UMC, Miamisburg, 
OH. 

FM-12872-0071-D The Practice of Homosexuality Incompatible 
with The Holy Bible. Administrative Council, Frankford and Hickory 
Hills UMCs, Frankford, DL. 

CS-12406-0071-D Abortion. Church and Society WoHt Area, 
Fra2er Menwrial UMC, Montgomery, AL. 

FM-11887-0071-D The Sanctity of Marriage. Administratiue 
Board, Frazer Memorial UMC, Montgomery, AL. 

MN-10166-O402-D Acc^ting Homosexuals in the Ministry. Rev. 
Delbert G. Freeman and 29 Individuals. 

FA-101 18-0906-D Homosexuality: Funding of Gay Caucus or 
Group. Rev. Freeman, Dr. Hrisak, 7 churches + 29 ind. 

OO-11808-0726-D Conference Council Director. Gainsville District 
Clergy, Trinify UMC, Gainesville, FL 

LC-11818-0228-D InsLCtive Memhar Category . Robert L. Gamble, 
MNN. 

IC-11628-2001-D Duties of GCCUIC to the General Board of 
Global Ministries. Langdon Garrison, UMC, Pensacola, FL 

IO-11624-2101-D Duties of GCRR to the GBCS. Langdon 
Garrison, UMC, Pensacola, FL. 

IO-11626-2201-D Transfer Duties to CS. Langdon Garrison, 
UMC, Pensacola, FL 

FA-11888-8000-R Pension of Lay Staff Persons. 165 Staff of 
GBCS, GBGM. UMCOM, BHEMandGBOD. 

CS-1068S-8000-R Confronting the Drug Crisis. GBCS, GBGM. 

CS-10688-SO0O-R Universal Access to Health Care in the U.S. and 
Related Territories. GBCS, KSE. 

CO-10667-0608-D Petitions to Gena-al Confarence. GBCS. 

CS-10668-0072-D The Social Community. Amend Para. 72-C, 72-G 
and72-L. GBCS. 

CS-106a9-0728-D Conference Board of Church and Society. GBCS. 

OS-10670-1106-D .Organization of the General Board of Church 
and Society. GBCS. 

OS-10671-1109-D The Executive Committee of the General Board 
ofChurch and Society. GBCS. 

CS-10672-1110-O Nominating Committee of the General Board of 
Church and Society. GBCS. 

CS-10681-S00O-R AtBrmati ve Action Plans and People with 
DisabiUtiee. GBCS. 

CS-10682-8000-R Drug and Alcohol Concerns. GBCS. 

O8-106S4-8000-R Environmental Justice for a Sustainable 
Future. GBCS. 

OS-10686-8000-R United Methodism m a New Europe. GBCS. 

OS-1068e-8000-R New Developments in Genetic Science. GBCS. 

O8-10687-8000-R U.S. Gun Violence. GBCS. 

CS-10688-8000-R Available and Affordable Housing. GBCS. 

C8-1069O.800O-R Infant Formula Abuse. GBCS. 

C8-10691-8000-R Ministries on Mental Illness. GBCS. 

CS-10692-8000-R Peace with Justice as a Special Programi GBCS. 

OS-10698-8000-R Ratification of Human Rights Covenants and 
Conventions. GBCS. 

O8-106»4-S00O-R Environmental Racism GBCS. 

CS-10696-8000-R In Support of the United Nations. GBCS. 

CS-1069ft.800O-R U.S. - Mexico Bcrder. GBCS. 

FA-10678-0906-D The Church's Ministry in Req>ond to the HTV 
Crisis. GBCS. 

FA-10674-0907-D Administrative Responsibility of the Council on 
Finance and Administration. GBCS. 

FA-1 0676-1604-0 Authority of the General Board of Penaiona. 
GBCS. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



47 



FA-10676-1808-D Financial Policy of the General Board of 
Pensions. OBCS. 

FM-10697-8000-R Human and Civil Rigfata of Lesbians and Gay 
Men. OBCS. 

OJ-10677-08ie-D Policies Relative to Socially Responsible 
InvestmenU. OJ3C5. 

GJ-1 1064-SOOO-R Continuation of the Incorporation of Ethnic 
Local Church Concerns in the Life of the Denomination. OBCS. 
LC-1067W>202-D The Function of the Local Church. GBCS. 
LC-10679-0208-D Church Membership. OBCS. 
LC-10680-0261-D Ehitiee of the Work Area Chairperson of Church 
and Society. OBCS. 

FA-11829-800O-R Relocation of The General Board Would Mean 
Lose of Employment. 221 Support Staff of OBOM, 476 Rivenide Drive, 
New York, NY. 

CO-1208S-0012-C General Conference Membership. 63 Mem. of 
OBOM, Womena Div. + St Paul, St Andrew), New York, NY. 

CO-12084-002S^ Jurisdictional Conference Membership. 63 
Item, of OBOM, Woment Diu. + St Paul, St Andrew), New York, NY. 

CO-10700-0701-D Composition and Character of the Clergy 
Membership of an Annual Conference. GBQM. 

CO-10704-0706-D Journal of an Annual Conference. OBOM. 
C8-10717-800O-R Central America: Peace and Just Life. OBOM. 
C8-10718-8000-R Web of Apartheid, South Africa and the 
Deatabilixation of Its Neighbors. GBGU. 

C8-10719-800O-R The Middle East in the Aftennath of the Gulf 
War. OBOM. 

CS-1072O.a00O-R Literacy, The Right to Learn: A Basic Human 
Ri^t. OBOU. 

CS-10721-8000-R Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation. 
OBOU. 

CS-10722-8000-R The Church and the Global HTV/Aids Epidemic. 
OBOM. 

C8-10724-8000-R A Call for Increased Commitment to End World 
Hunger and Peace. OBOM. 

C8-10726-«000-R Homelesaneea in the USA. OBOM. 
C8-10728-a00O-R Domestic Violence and Sexual Abuse. OBOM. 
C8-10728-aOOO-R Health in Mind and Body. OBOM. 
C8-1078(M000-R Holy Living/Holy Dying. OBOM. 
DI-10701-1202-D ReeponsibiUties of the General Board of 
Discipline. OBOM. 

DI-10702-121ft-D The Mission Education Program of the General 
Board of Discipleship. OBOM. 

FA-10728-8000-R Location of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. OBOM. 

GJ-1070S-2a21-D Chargeable Offensee. OBOU. 
GJ-10728-SOOO-R Mission and Aging of Global Population. 
OBOM. 

GJ-10781-S00O-R Continuation of Afiriea Church Growth and 
Development Program. OBOM. 

GJ-10782-S00a.S9 Report and Recommendation of the 
Inter-agency Task Force on Aids. OBOM. 

GJ-10788-80OO-R Toward a New Beginning Beyond 1992. OBOM. 
GJ-10784-80OO-R Central Conferences Representation on Church 
Agencies. OBOM. 

OM-1070fi-0781-D Composition of the Conference Board of Global 
Ministries. OBOM. 

GM-1070e-1414-D Responsibilities of the National Division. 
OBOM. 

GM-10707-1418-D The Office of Deaconess. OBOM. 
OM-10708-1419-D Committee on Deaconess Service. OBOM. 
GM-10709-1420-D The Deaconess Program OfRce. OBOM. 
GM-10710-1440-D ResponsibiUtiee of the Health and Welfare 
Ministries Department. OBOM. 

OM-10711-1449-D Responsibilities of the Mission Education and 
Cultivation Department. OBOM. 

QM-10712-14S9-D Objectives and Responsibilities of the United 
Methodist Committee on Relief Department. OBOM. 

OM-11024-S000-8$ Native American Comprehensive Plan. OBOM. 
LC-1071S-0262-D Reeponsibilitiee of the Health and Welfare 
Ministries Representative. OBOM. 

LX;-10714-2640-D Incorporated Local Church Property Sale, 
Lease, Transfer, cr Mortgage. OBOM. 

MN-1048ft4>440-D Special Provisions for Ordained Ministers. 
OBOM. 



MN-10716-0448-D Appointments to Various Ministries. OBOM. 
MN-10716-162»-D The Division of Ordained Ministry. OBOM. 
MN-10461-0612-D Bishops in Central Conferences. OBBM, 
OCCU. 

CO-1087W)701-D Rights of Clergy Members, Local and Student 
Part-time Pastors. OBHM. 

CO-10880-0704-D Business of the Conference. OBHM. 
CO-10881 -0726-0 Presence of Conference Council Director at 
Cabinet Meetings. OBHM. 

FA-10882-1806-D Normal Conditions for Full Pension Credit. 
OBHM. 

GJ-10888-0274-D United Methodist Student Day. OBHM. 
GJ-10884-lOOe-D Responsibilities of the General Council on 
Ministries. OBHM. 

GJ-10886-262d-D Miscellaneous Provisions. OBHM. 
HE-1 0886-0782-D Responsibilities of an Annual Conference Board 
of Higher Education and Campus Ministry. OBHM. 

HE-10887-1611-D Responsibilitiee of the Division of Chaplains 
and Related Ministries. OBHM. 

HE-10881-161S-D General Responsibilities of the Division of 
Higher Education. OBHM. 

HE-10892-1514-D Responsibilities to General and Annual 
Conferences. OBHM. 

HE-10898-161S-D Responsibilities to Institutions. OBHM. 
HE-10894-1517-D Membership and Organizations. OBHM. 
HE-10886-1B18-D Purposes and Objectives of the Board of Hi^er 
Education and Ministry. OBHM. 

HE-10886-1622-D The National Methodist Foundation for 
Christian Higher Education. OBHM. 

HE-10897-1680-D Schools of Theology. OBHM. 
LC-108984)217-D Admission into the Church. OBHM. 
LC-1089&O21S-D Admission into the Church. OBHM. 
LC-10400-026S-D The Committee on Pastor-Parish Relatione. 
OBHM. 

MN-10401-O804-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. OBHM. 
MN-10402-O80e-D Transfer of Diaconal Ministry Candidates. 
OBHM. 

MN-1O4O8-O806-D Requirements for Consecration as a Diaconal 
Minister. OBHM. 

MN-10404-O8O7-D Consecrations to the Office of Diaoonal 
Minister. OBHM. 

MN-10406.0809-D Rightsof the Diaconal Ministers. OBHM. 
MN-10406-0810-D Service Appointment of Diaconal Minirters. 
GBHJf. 

MN-10407-O811-D Credential and Records of Diaconal Minister. 
OBHM. 

MN-10409-0812-D TVansfer of Diaconal Ministers. OBHM. 
MN-1041(M)818-D Diaconal Ministers Change in Conference 
Relationship. OBHM. 

MN-104124S15-D Diaconal Minister's Relationship to the 
Employing Agency. OBHM. 

MN-10417-0406-D Authority and Duties of a Local Pastor. OBHM. 
MN-10418-0407-D License as a Local Pastor. OBHM. 
MN-10419-0410-D Discontinuance of Local Pastor. OBHM. 
MN-10422-0412-D AmenabiUty of Clergy. OBBM. 
MN-10428-O418-D Probationary Membership. OBHM. 
MN-10424.0417-D Continuation in Probationary Membership. 
OBHM. 

MN-10426.0418-D Discontinuance firom Probationary 
Membership. OBHM. 

MN-1 0426-0420-0 Requirements for Election as Associate 
Members. OBHM. 

MN-10427-0421-D Progression of Associate Members. OBHM. 
MN-10428-0428-D Rights and ResponsibiUtiee of Full Clergy 
Members. OBHM. 

MN-10420.0424-O Requirements for Adnussion to Full 
Membership. OBHM. 

MN-10480-0426-O Ministers from Other Denominations. OBHM. 
MN-10482.O427-O TVansfer of Ministers from Other Annual 
Conferences. OBHM. 

MN-10488-0482-O The Act of Ordination. OBHM. 
MN-10484-O487-O Full-Time Service for Ordained Ministry. 
OBHM. 

MN-104S6-048&-O Responsibilities and Duties of a Pastor. OBHM. 



48 



May 5. 1992 



MN-10487-O448-D AppointmenU Beyond the Local United 
Methodist Church. GBHM. 

MN-1M40-0448-D Leave of Absence for Ordained Ministers. 
OBHM. 

MN-1044S-O460-D Disability Leave for Clergy Persons. GBBU. 

MN-10444-04ei-D Voluntary Retirement Pension. GBHM. 

MN-10446-04e2-D Review of Full and Associate Conference 
Membership. GBHM. 

MN-10446-046S-D Grievance Procedures for Ordained Ministers. 
OBHM. 

MN-10447-04M-D Readmiasion to Probationary Membership. 
GBHM. 

MN-1044ft^>4S6-D Readmiasion After Surrender of the Ministerial 
Office. GBHM. 

MN-1044&M6^D Readmiasion after Involuntary Retirement. 
OBHM. 

MN-10460-060S-D Offices of Bishop and District Superi ntendent. 
GBHM. 

BfN-104fi2-0618-D Involuntary Termination of Office. GBHM. 

MN-104U-061S-D Presidential Duties of BUhops. GBHM. 

BIN-10464-0616-D Working with Ordained Ministers. GBHM. 

MN-10466-062&-D Cabinet and the Appointment Making Process. 
OBHM. 

MN-ICMSS-OSSO-D Appointment Making Across Conference Lines. 
GBHM. 

HN-10467-06S8-D Duties of the Jurisdictional Committees on 
Ordained Ministries. GBHM. 

MN-10468-07SS-D Composition of Conference Board of Ordained 
Ministry. GBHM. 

MN-1046»«7S4'D Responsibilities of Conference Board of 
Diaconal Ministry. GBHM. 

MN-10461-0762-D Composition of the District Committee on 
Ordained Ministry. GBHM. 

MN-10171-0788-D Lay Observers on Confa-ence Board of 
Ordained Ministry. GBOD, EPA, MNN. 

CO-1060(M000-R Amend the Term "Executive Session." GBOD, 
EPA. 

LC-1014S-0269-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
GBOD, EPA. 

OJ-107de-0818-D Disbursement of General Funds by the Annual 
Conference. OBOD, GCOM, GCFA. 

CO-10177-00S8-C Clergy Delegates to General Conference. 
OBOD, KSE and DET. 

LC-10802-Q262-D The Administrative Council as the 
Organizational Perm. GBOD, MNN. 

CO-10787-0704-D Mandates Time for a Laity Report at Annual 
Ccaiference. OBOD. 

CO-107S8-074S-D Membership of the District Council on 
Ministries. GBOD. 

CO-1079S-0701-D Voting Righto fcr Local Student Pastors and 
Affiliate Clergy Members. GBOD. 

CO-107844>720-D Membership of the Annual Conference Council 
on Ministries. GBOD. 

DU0789-0000-D District Board of Laity. GBOD. 

DI-10740-0O0O-D Christian Formation Responsibilities of the 
General Board of Disdpleship. GBOD. 

DM0741-0277-D Local Church Lay Speaker. GBOD. 

DU0742-0278-D Local Church Lay Speaker. GBOD. 

DI-1074S-0279-D Renewal of Certificates of a Certifies Lay 
Speaker. OBOD. 

DI-10744-06S6-D Jurisdictional Committee on United Methodist 
Men. GBOD. 

DI-1074S-0729-D Conference Board of Discipleehip. GBOD. 

DM074»«780-D Conference Board of Laity . GBOD. 

DM0747-0748-D Annual Conference United Methodist Men's 
Organization. OBOD. 

DM0748-0748-D ReeponsibiUties of the District Lay Leader. 
OBOD. 

DI-10749-0768-D District Committee on Lay Speaking. GBOD. 

DM0760-076e-D District Level United Methodist Men 
Organization. OBOD. 

DI-107S1-1202-D Authority of the General Board of Discipleehip. 
OBOD. 

DI-10762-1204-D Organization of the General Board of 
Diseqileship. OBOD. 



DI-10768-1207-D Christian Education and Age Level Ministries of 
the General Board of Discipleehip. GBOD. 

OI-10764-1212-D Evangelism, the responsibility of the General 
Board of Discipleehip. GBOD. 

DI-107eS-1218-D Evangelism Responsibilities of the General 
Board of Discipleship. GBOD. 

DI-107S6-1214-D Worship Re^Mnsibilities of the General Board of 
Discipleship. GBOD. 

DI-10767-1216-D Stewardship <^ the General Board of 
Discipleehip. GBOD. 

DI-10758-1216-D Devotional Life Responsibilities of the Uppa- 
Room. GBOD. 

DI-10769-1217-D Heading Under Section V, Ministry of the Laity. 
GBOD. 

DI-107eO-1218-D Leadership and Ministry Development 
Responsibilities. GBOD. 

DI-107ei-0000-D Committee on Older Adult Minietriee. GBOD. 

DI-107e2-1221-D Comprehensive Youth Ministry. GBOD. 

DM 0768-1222-D United Methodist Men's Division. GBOD. 

DI-10764-1228-D Heading Under Section V, Gena-al Board of 
Discipleehip Curriculum Resourcee Committee. GBOD. 

DI-1078O-O278-D The Certified Lay Speaker. GBOD. 

DH0790-1211-D Renumber and Move Paragraphs. GBOD. 

DM0792-S0OO-R Spanish Language Hymnal. GBOD. 

FA-10796-0722-D Availability of Supervisory Appointments. 
GBOD. 

GJ-107e6-0814-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff of General 
Agencies. GBOD. 

GJ-10796-0806-D Inclusivenees of Membership on General Boards 
and Agencies. GBOD. 

GM-10787-0781-D Reeponsibilitiee of the Conference Board of 
Global Ministries. GBOD. 

GM-10798-1414-D Responsibilities of the National Division. 
GBOD. 

LC-10767.0202-D Functions of the Local Church. GBOD. 

LC-10768-0211-D The Meaning rf Membership. GBOD. 

LC-1076W)218-D Church Memb<rship, A Part of Discipleehip. 
GBOD. 

LC-1077(M)216-D Admission into the Church. GBOD. 

LC-10771-0217-D Vows Administered in Settings Different frcm a 
Local Church. GBOD. 

LC-10772-0226-D Training fa- Children of the Church. GBOD. 

LC-10778-O228-D The Church's Mcral and Spiritual Obligaticn to 
Care for ito Members. GBOD. 

LC-10774-0247-D Election of the Recording Seo-etary of Charge 
Conference. GBOD. 

LC-1077S-02SS-D The Purpose of the Administrative Board. 
GBOD. 

LC-10776-0264-D The Membership of the Administrative Board. 
GBOD. 

LC-10777-0266-D Organization of the Administrative Board. 
GBOD. 

LC-10778-0266-D ReeponsibiUties of the Administrative Board. 
GBOD. 

LC-10779-0267-D Reeponsibilitiee of lie Council on Ministries. 
GBOD. 

LC-107804268-D The Basic Membo-ship of the Council on 
Ministries. GBOD. 

LC-10781-02ei-D The Work Area of the Chairperson of Worship. 
GBOD. 

LO10782-02d8-D Youth Ministry. GBOD. 

LC-10788-0268-D A Structure for the Class Meetings. OBOD. 

LC-10799-0206-D Teaching Parish. OBOD. 

LC-1080(M)244-D Organization and Administration of the Local 
Church. OBOD. 

LC-10801-0246-D The Basic Organizational Plan for the Local 
Church. GBOD. 

MN-10784-O486-D The Order of Elder. GBOD. 

MN-10786-(V148-D Appointmento Beyond the Local United 
Methodist Church. GBOD. 

MN-10786-0619-D Specific Responsibilities of District 
Superintendento. GBOD. 

MN-10787-0680-D Pastor and Clergy Appointment Making. 
OBOD. 



f 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



49 



MN-10788-0762-D Memb«whip of the District Comnuttee on 
OnUined Ministry. OBOD. 

MN-1080W)4«7-D The Itinerant System. OBOD. 

MN-10804-0489-D Reeponsibilitiee and Duties of a Pastor. OBOD. 

IrIN-108064>682-D Longer Pastoral Tenures. OBOD. 

MN-10806-0684-D Frequency of Pastoral Appointments. GBOD. 

MN-10807.aOOO-R Conference Approval Evangelists. OBOD. 

CO-1103&4W27-D The Jurisdictional Conference Journal. GBPB. 

CO-1108S4000-R An Expression of Appreciation to Dr. Carlton R. 
Toung for His Ministry to the Church. OBPB. 

DI-11037-122»-D Relationships of the Curriculum Resource 
Committee. OBPB. 

FA-1102S-0906-D Printing and Publication of Official Forms and 
Records. OBPB. 

FA-11028-1701-D Publishing Interests of the General Board of 
Publication. OBPB. 

FA-11029-1709-D The United Methodist Publishing House. 

OBPB. 

FA-11080-1710-D Directors and Trustees of the United Methodist 
Publishing House. OBPB. 

FA-11081-1711-D Agencies and Instrumentalities of the United 
Methodist Publishing House. OBPB. 

FA-110«3-1718-D The Objectives of The United Methodist 
Publishing House. OBPB. 

FA-110S8-171ft-D Duties and Responsibilities of The United 
Methodist PublUhing House. OBPB. 

FA-11084-1719-D Property, Assets and Income of The United 
Methodist Publishing House. OBPB. 

FA-11086-1721-D OfBcers of the Corporation of the United 
Methodist Publishing House. GBPB. 

F A-1 1086-1 722-D TTie Executive OfBcer of the United Methodist 
Publishing House. GBPB. 

FA-11087-1741-D Printing for Church Agencies. OBPB. 

CS-10941-8000-R Universal Access to Health Care. OBPN. 

FA-10926-8000-R Ministerial Pension Plan. OBPN. 

FA-10827-4000-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section I. 

OBPN. 

FA-10e2ft4000-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 2. 

OBPN. 

FA-1082MM)00-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 3. 

OBPN. 

FA-10880-8000-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 4. 
OBPN. 

FA-10881-8000-R Con^)rehensive Protection Plan Section 6. 
OBPN. 

FA-10eS2-8000-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 6. 
OBPN. 

FA-10988-S00O-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 7. 
OBPN. 

FA-10e»4-80O0-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 9. 
OBPN. 

FA-108864000-R Comprehensive Protection Plan Section 10. 

OBPN. 

FA-10988-8000-R Cumulative Pension and Benefit Fund. OBPN. 

FA-10987-S0OO-R Tax-Deferred Annuity Contributions Program. 
OBPN. 

FA-108S8-8000.R UM CARE. OBPN. 

FA-1098&.8000-R Staff Retirement Benefits Program. OBPN. 

FA-10MO400O-R Basic Protection Plan. OBPN. 

FA-10M2-O787-D Proportional Payments of the Conference Board 
of Pensions. OBPN. 

F A-1 0048-1 601-D Name, Corporations and Locations of the 
General Board of Pensions. OBPN. 

FA-10e44-l e02-D Membership of the General Board of Pensions. 
OBPN. 

FA-10046-1608-D Officers of the General Board of Pensions. 
OBPN. 

FA-1O048-16O4-D General Authorization of the General Board of 
Pensions. OBPN. 

FA-1 0647-1606-0 Powers, Duties and Reeponsibilitiea of the 
Annual Conference Board. OBPN. 

FA-10948-1608-D Joint Distributing Committees. OBPN. 

OJ-1004&4>80S-D Administrative General Agencies. GBPN. 
OJ-10e6<M>806-D Election of Membership by Jurisdictional 
Conferences. OBPN. 



GJ-10961-0814-D Provisions Pertaining to Staff. OBPN. 

GJ-10962-0816-D Policies Relative to Socially Responsible 
InvestmenU. OBPN. 

MN-10968-0407-D Appointment as a Local Full-time Pasts. 
GBPN. 

MN-10964-O41O-D Retirement Provisions for Full-time Local 
Pastors. GBPN. 

MN-10866-0487-D The Itinerant System. OBPN. 

MN-10960-044S-D Leave of Absence for Ordained Ministers. 
GBPN. 

MN-10967-0449-D Maternity/Paternity Leave for Clergy 
Members. OBPN. 

MN-10968-04SO-D Disability Leave for Clergy Persons. GBPN. 

MN-10969.0461-D Retirement Benefits for Ordained Minirters. 
GBPN. 

MN-10960-0688-D The Process of Appointment Making. OBPN. 

IC-10627-0788-D Responsibilities of the Commission on Archives 
and History. OCAH. 

IC-1062S-1808-D Purpose of the Commission on Archives and 
History. GCAif. 

IC-10629-1804-D Membership ofthe General Commission on 
Archives and History. GCAB. 

IC-10680-1810-D The Historical Society. GCAB. 

IC-10681-1812-D Historic Shrines, Historic Landmarks and 
Historic Sites. GCAH. 

IC-10e82-S000-R History of Radal/Ethnic United MethodisU. 

GCAB. 

IC-10688-8000-R New Historic Shrines and Landmarks. OCAH. 

LC-10078-0264-D Affiliate and Associate Members on 
Administrative Board. OCCU, TRY. 

C8-10666-8000-R Understanding Living and Dying as Faithful 
Christians. GCCU. 

GJ-10e66-S000-R Toward a New Beginning Beyond 1992. GCCU. 

HE-10644-1S81-D United Methodist Schools of Theology. GCCU. 

IC-10646-2002-D The Purpose rf the GCCUIC. OCCU. 

IC-10646-2008-D Req>onsibilitiee of the GCCUIC. GCCU. 

IC-10647-2006-D Composition of the GCCUIC. GCCU. 

IC-10648-8000-R Continuing Membership in the World Council of 
Churches. OCCU. 

IC-10649-8000-R Continuing Membership in the National Council 
of Churches. GCCU. 

IC-10660.8000-R Continuing Membership in the Consultation on 
Church Union. GCCU. 

IC-10e61-8000-R Toward an Ecumenical Future. GCCU. 

IC-10662-8000-R Confession to Native Americans. GCCU. 

IC-10668-aOOO-R Our Muslim Neighbors. OCCU. 

IC-10664-8000-R Ecumenical IntaTJ'*t*''°"»°*^^'«'*"°*' 
Standards. OCCU. 

LC-1068*0227-D Affiliate and Associate Membership. OCCU. 

MN-10689<M26-D Appointment of Ministers from Other 
Conferences and Denominations. GCCU. 

MN-10640-0485-D The Order of Elder. GCCU. 

MN-1 0641 -0488-0 AppointmenU to Various Ministries. OCCU. 

MN-10642-0489-D ResponsibiUtiee and Duties of a Pastor. OCCU. 

MN-106484)614-O Specific Responsibilities of Bishops. OCCU, 

Council ofBiihopa. 

CO-10888-0607-D Assignment Process of the Jurisdictional 
Conmuttee on Episcopacy. GCFA. 

CO-10894-0706-O Records and Archives of the Annual 
Conference. GCFA. 

FA-10626-8000-A The World Service Fund. OCFA. 

FA-10626-800O-A The Ministerial Education Fund. OCFA. 

FA-10627-8O0O-A The Black College Fund. OCFA. 

FA-10628-8000-A The Africa University Fund. GCFA. 

FA-10629-8000-A The Episcopal Fund. OCFA. 

FA-1068(^8000-A The General Administration Fund. OCFA. 

FA-10681-800O-A The Interdenominational Cooperation Fund. 

GCFA. 

FA-1OS82-S0OO-A Apportionment Formulas. OCFA. 

FA-10688-8000-A Special Sundays With Offering. GCFA. 

FA-10684-8000-A Directives for the Administration of the General 

Ponds. OCFA. 

FA-10688-8000-A Income Prom the Board of Tirustees. OCFA. 

FA-10686400O-A Churches' Center for Theology and Public 
Policy. GCFA. 



50 



May 5, 1992 



FA-10M7-8O0O-A References from the 1988 General Conference. 
OCFA. 

FA-106S8-S000-A Budget of the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. GCFA. 

FA-1068S-S0OO-A Reports and Recommendations presented with 
other General Agencies. GCFA. 

FA-1078ft4000-R Investment Ethics. GCFA. 

FA-10886-0708-D Membership of the Conference Council on 
Finance and Administration. GCFA. 

FA-1089«-071S-D Annual Conference Treasurer/Director of 
Administrative Services. GCFA. 

FA-10887-0722-D The Equitable Salary Fund. GCFA. 

FA-10898-07S6-D The Episcopal Residence Committee. GCFA. 

FA-10899-090e-D Organization of the General Council on Finance 
and Administration. GCFA. 

FA-10900-0907-D Other Administrative Responsibilities of the 
General Council on Finance and Administration. GCFA. 

FA-10901-0920-D The Temporary General Aid Fund. GCFA. 

FA-108O2-O924-D The Episcopal Fund. GCFA. 

FA-1090S-08S1-D Pension Allowance for the Episcopacy. GCFA. 

FA-109O4-09S2-D Retired Bishops Assigned to Active Episcopal 
Duty. GCFA. 

FA-10905-2606-D Local Church Board of Trustees. GCFA. 

FA-10906-2612-D The Membership and Authority of Annual 
Conference Board of Trustees. GCFA. 

FA-10907-2618-D Board of Church Location and Building. GCFA. 

FA-1000»-2628-D Sale, Transfer, Lease, or Mortgage of District 
Property. GCFA. 

GJ-10909-0278-D Two Church-wide Sundays Provide 
Opportunities for Annual Conference Offering. GCFA, GCOM. 

GJ-10910-0807-D Organizational Meetings After the General 
Conference. GCFA. 

GJ-10911-0814-D Normal Retirement for all General Agency Staff 
Personnel. GCFA. 

GJ-10912-0821-D Standards for Computer Information and Data. 
GCFA. 

GJ-10918-0916-D Gena-al Church Special Day Offering. GCFA. 

GJ-10914-2626-D General Appeal Procedures. GCFA. 

GJ-11068-0818-D Disbursement of Funds by Annual Conference. 
GCFA. 

LC-10915-O2S4-D The Basic Membership Church Recca-ds. GCFA. 

LC-109ie-024&-D Standards for Computer Information and Data. 
GCFA. 

LC-10917-0246-D The Charge Conference. GCFA. 

LC-10918-0247-D Powers and Duties of the Charge Conference. 
GCFA. 

LC-10919-2624-D Local Church Board of Trustees. GCFA. 

LC-10920-2629-D The Terms of Trustees, Directors and Boards. 
GCFA. 

LC-10921-26S2-D Board of Trustees ■ Powers and Limitations. 
GCFA. 

LC-10922-2689-D Unincorporated Local Church Property. GCFA. 

MN-10928-0629-D Cabinet and the Appointment Making Process. 
OCFA. 

HN-10924^>786-D Membership of the Conference Committee on 
Episcopacy. GCFA. 

MN-10926-0754-D Committee on District Superintendency. 
GCFA. 

CO-10809-0602-D Composition of the Voting Membership of 
General Conference. GCOM, GCFA. 

CO-10812-0ei4-D The Membership of Jurisdictional Conferences. 
GCOif, GCFA. 

CO-10816-0706-D Inclusiveness in the Membership of Councils, 
Boards and Agencies of the Annual Conference. GCOM, GCFA. 

GJ-1082e-0278-D Observance of Special Sundays. GCOM, GCFA. 

GJ-10827-0274-D Church-wide Special Sundays with Offerings. 
GCOif, GCFA. 

GJ-1082&480S-D Defining a Special Program. GCOM, GCFA. 

GJ-10880-0806-D Basic Membership of General Program Boards. 
GCOif, GCFA. 

GJ-l 0881-0806-0 Committee to Nominate Additional Members to 
General Programs, Agencies, or Councils. GCOM, GCFA. 

GJ-10SS8-0808-D Election and Terms of Officers of Program 
Boards. GCOif, GCFA. 



GJ-108S6-0S22-D Evangelical United Brethren Council cf 
Administration. GCOM, GCFA. 

GJ-10886-0824-D Church Founding Date. GCOM, GCFA. 

CO-10808-0000-D The District Conference. GCOM. 

CO-108104)e08-D Provision for Petitions Not Printed in the 
Advance Edition. GCOM. 

CO-10811-Oeil-D The Book of Resolutionsto Include Guidelines 
fo- Writing Resolutions. GCOM. 

CO-1081S-0701-D Duty of the Lay Member to Annual Conference. 
GCOM. 

CO-10814-0704-D Business of the Annual Conference. GCOif. 

CO-10816-0705-D Listing of Buanees of the Annual Conference in 
the Conference Journal. GCOM. 

CO-1081 7-0720-D Membership of Conference Committees Task 
Forces and Consultations. GCOM. 

DI-1081S«000-D Committee on Older Adult Ministries. GCOM. 

FA-10819-O708-D OfGcere of the Conference Council on Finance 
and Administration. GCOM. 

FA-10820^1S-D Membership of the Conference Credit Review 
Committee. GCOM. 

FA-10821-0786-D Composition of the Membership of the Episcopal 
Residence Conunittee. GCOM. 

FA-10822-2620-D Approval of Construction Purchase or 
Remodeling Plans for Local Churches. GCOM. 

FM-10828-006e-D "Our Distinctive Heritage as United 
Methodist". GCOM. 

FM-10824-0071-D Human Sexuality, RigfaU of Homosexual 
Persons. GCOM. 

FM-10866-8000-A Report on the Study of Homosexuality. GCOM. 

GJ-10828-0747-D Composition of the Membership of District 
Conference. GCOM. 

GJ-10S82-0807-D Organizational Meeting of General Program 
Agencies. GCOif. 

GJ-108S4-0822-D Standards for Computer Information and Data. 
GCOif. 

GJ-1 0887-1 OOe-D Responsibilities of the General Council on 
Ministries. GCOM. 

GJ-10860-8000-A Quadrennial Report of the General Council on 
Ministries for the 1989-92 Quadrennium. GCOM. 

GJ-10861-8000-A< Report and Recommendation fcr 1993-96 
Quadrennial Theme and Three fecial F^grams. GCOM. 

GJ-10862-8000-A Report on the Study of Connectional Issues. 
GCOM. 

GJ-10868-8000-A Resolutions on Special Days, Local Church 
Legislation- Re: Special Sundays. GCOM. 

GJ-108M-800O-A Report on the Study of the Connectional 
Principle. GCOM. 

GJ-10866-8000-A Report on the Churches' Center fcr Theology 
and Public Policy. GCOM. 

GJ-10866-8000-A Report on the Referral Regarding the Size of 
General Agency Program Boards. GCOM. 

GJ-10867-8000-A Report on the Book of Resolution. GCOM. 

GJ-10868-8000-A Report on Monitoring of Groups. GCOM. 

GJ-1086&4000-A Report on Task Force on Spanish Language 
Resources. GCOM. 

GJ-1086(KS0OO-A Report on the World Service Special Gifts 
Program GCOM. 

GJ-10861-8800-A$ Report of the Advisory/Coordinating 
Committee on Older Adults. GCOM. 

GJ-10862-8000-A Report on Prison Ministry/Prison Reform. 
GCOif. 

6J-1080S-SOOO-At Report on Developing Congregations for Deaf 
Ministries. GCOM. 

GJ-108d4-800O-A Report on 1992 "The Year of a Now Beginning". 
GCOM. 

GJ-10866-8000-A Report on the General Agency 
Headquarters/Staff Location. GCOM. 

GJ-1086»«000-A Report on Inter-agency Reqwnse to the Refugee 
Crisis. GCOM. 

GJ-1086&4S0OO-A Policies Regarding Special Study Committees, 
Task Groups, Commissions, Etc., by General Conference. GCOM. 

GJ-10870-8000-A Report on Program Related Agencies, 
Commissions on Communications, Archives and History. GCOM. 

GJ-10871-S00O-A Repcrt on the Evaluation of the General 
Council on Ministries. GCOM. 



« 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



51 



QJ-10872-S0OO-A Report of the GCOM Ethnic Local Church 
Concenu Committae. OCOM. 

GJ-1087S-800O-A Report on Native American Minirtries Within 
the United Methodist Church. OCOU. 

GJ-10874-SOOO-A Report of the GCOM Taak Force on 
Incluaiveneaa. OCOM. 

OJ-1087S-S000-A Report on the Information of the 1989-92 
Quadrennial Theme. OCOU. 

C}J-1087e-SOOO-A Report on GranU from the World Service 
Contingency Fund, 1989-92. OCOU. 

GJ-10877.SOOO-A Report on the Advance for Chrirt and His 
Church. OCOU. 

OJ-1087»4000-A Report on the Work of the Inter-agency Task 
Force on Legislation. GCOM. 

OJ-1087&4000-A Report on the Training Events for New District 
Superintendents and Conference Council Directors. OCOM. 

aj-10S8O-S00O-A Report on the Process for Development for a 
Quadrennial Theme and Special Program. GCOM. 

OJ-10881-S000-A Report on Implementation of 1989-92 Special 
Programs. GCOM. 

OJ-108S2-S000-A Report on Sexual Harassment in Church and 
Society in the USA. OCOM. 

GJ-10888-S00O-A Report on Referral Regarding Council of 
Bishop's Initiative. OCOM. 

GJ-10884-SOOO-A Report on Referral Preparation for the 1992 
General Conference. GCOM. 

GJ-10886-8000-A Report Telecommunications. GCOM. 

GJ-lOSSe-SOOO-A Report on Biblical and Theological Language. 
OCOM. 

OJ-10887-S000-A Report on Goal to Increase Membership. GCOM. 

GJ-10888-SOOO-A Report to GCFA on Needs of General Program 
Agencies from World Service Fund. OCOM. 

GJ-10889400O-A Recommendation to GCFA Regarding World 
Service Fund Allocation for the 1993-96 Quadrennium. GCOM. 

GJ-1088O400O-A Report on Inter-agency Task Force on Aids. 
OCOM. 

GJ-10881-S00O-A Report on Strengthening Small Membership 
Churches. OCOM. 

GJ-10S92-S0OO-A Report on 1988 General Conference "Unfinished 
Business. OCOM. 

GM-108SfrO7Sl-D Promotion of the Golden Cross Offering. 
OCOM. 

GM-I0867-S000-A$ Report of the Committee to Develop a National 
Plan for Hispanic Ministry. OCOM. 

IC-108S9-0000-D District Director of Ethnic Local Church 
Concerns. OCOM. 

LC-1084»010a-D The Ministry of AU Christians. GCOM. 

LC-10841-010S-D The Mission and Ministry of the Church. 
OCOif. 

LC-10842-0112-D The Challenge of Doing Mission and Ministry. 
OCOlf. 

LC-1084S-011S-D Called to Inclusivenees. GCOM. 

LC-10844-0202-D Functions of the Local Church. GCOM. 

LC-1084e.0246-D Honorary Members of the Administrative 
Council / Board. OCOM. 

MN-10846-0618'D Membership of the Jurisdictional Review 
Committee. OCOM. 

MN-10847-0ei7-D Inclusivenees in the Selection of District 
Superintendents. OCOM. 

MN-10848-0680-D Open Itineracy as Part of the Appointment 
Making Process. GCOM. 

MN-10849-0764-D Membership of the Committee on District 
Superintendency. GCOM. 

GM'1066S-0781-D Transitional Local Church and Community 
Task Force. GCORR. 

IC-10664-0740-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race. 
OCORR. 

IC-10S6e-07Sl-D District Director of Religion and Race. GCORR. 

IC-10667-210S-D Responsibilities of the General Commission on 
Religion and Race. GCORR. 

LC-10661-O20ft-D Shared Facilities. GCORR. 

LC-106SS-2662-D Shared Facilities with Congregations and 
Groups. GCORR. 

MN-104184>404-D Candidacy for Ordained Ministry. GCORR. 



MN-1041ft4>40e-D Authority and Duties of Loeal Pastors. 
OCORR. 

MN-10420.0412-D Rights of Clergy Members. GCORR. 

MN-10fie44>S04-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. GCORR. 

MN-10666-0809-D Rightsof Diaconal Ministers. GCORR. 

CO-10642.072e-D Composition of the Committee on Ethnic Local 
Church Concerns. GCRR. 

CB-1061ft4000-R 1992 Amnesty for Puerto Ricans Political 
Prisoners and Prisoners of War. OCRR. 

C8-10617400O-R Puerto Rico Colonial Status. OCRR. 

CS-lOeiS-SOOO-R Racial Harassment. OCRR. 

CS-1064S-0078-D Migratory and Other Farm Workers. OCRR. 

GM-10618-S00O-R Promote the Observance of Native American 
Awareness Sunday. OCRR. 

IC-10614-S000-8 Terminology Task Force to the GCORR. OCRR. 

IC-106204000-R History ofBlacks in the UM Church. OCRR. 

IC-10621-SOOO-R Inclusive History. OCRR. 

IC-10622..<00O-M$ Racism in Rural Areas. OCRR. 

IC-1062S-S000-R Pacific Islanders Included as Racial and Ethnic 
Minority Group. OCRR. 

MN-10442-044d-D Ordained Minister's Salary while on Maternity 
/ Paternity Leave. OCSW and GBHM. 

6J-1012S-0816-D Policies Relative to Non-Discrimination. 
GC8W, GBGM, EPA, DET. 

FA-10S60-0906-D Fiscal Responsibilities in Response to the HIV 
Crisis. OCSW. GBGM. 

CC-10640-2801-D Central Conference Commiaeion on the Status 
and Role of Women. OCSW. 

CO-10641.070e-D Child and Dependent Care During Sessions and 
Meetings. GCSW. 

CO-10666-072e-D Committee for the Coordination of Ethnic Local 
Church Concerns. GCSW. 

CS-10e44-O074-D Civil Disobedience and Civil Disorder. GCSW. 

C8-1064e-1104-D Responsibilities of the General Board of Church 
and Society. GCSW. 

C8-1064e-0070-D Preamble to the Social Principles. GCSW. 

CS-10647-S0OO-R Sexual Harassment and The United Methodist 
Church. GCSW. 

FA-10648-0722-D Composition of the Commission on Equitable 
Salaries. GCSW. 

FA-10M&4787-D Membership of the Conference Board of 
Pensions. OCSW. 

FA-10661-1 702-D Organization of the General Board of 
Publications. GCSW. 

FA-10662-170e-D Membership of the General Board of 
Publications. GCSW. 

IC-10666.0741'D Responsibilities of a Confierence Conunission on 
the SUtus and Role of Women. GCSW. 

IC-10668-2208-D Responsibility of the Commission on the Status 
and Role of Women. GCSW. 

IC-10569-2204-D Membership in the Commission on tlie Status 
and Role of Women. OCSW. 

LC-106eO-0202-D Function of the Local Church. GCSW. 

LC-1 0662-0269-0 Duties of the Committee on Pastor Parish 
Relations. GCSW. 

MN-10408-OS04-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. GCSW. 

MN-10414-04O4-D Candidacy for Ordained Ministry. OCSW. 

MN-1041S-0406-D Rightsof Local Pastors. OCSW. 

MN-10421.O412-D Rightsof Clergy Members. GCSW. 

MN.1048»«44ft-D Family Leave for Ordained Ministers. GCSW. 

MN-10460-0784-D Membership of the Board of Diaconal Ministry. 
GCSW. 

MN-1111S-0683-D Appointment Making Criteria. ZV/tms 
Gdlhau; RKM. 

CS-12412-0071-D Alternatives for Abortion. Adminutrative 
Board, Georgetown and Mount Pleasant UMC, Bart, PA 

LC-121 12-024 7-D Salary and Other Remuneration of the Pastor 
and Staff. Staff Pariah Committee, Georgetown UMC, Jeniaon, MI. 

C8-12201-0074-D Military Service - War and Peace. Alan Qeyer 
and J. Philip Wogaman. NJY AND BLT. 

FA-11474-2614-D Episcopal Residence. Boutton M. Ooddard, 
Pint UMC, MaryuUle, TN. 

CO-1 ie7040S74; Reserve Delegates to Jurisdictional or Central 
Conferences. Max E. Goldman, IWA. 



52 



May 5. 1992 



CO-12068-060e-D Nomination and Election of Bishops. Victor W. 
Ooldtckmidt, St Andrew UUC, W. Lafayette, IN. 

CO-120694>701-D Composition of the Annual Conference. Victor 
W. Goldtchmidt, St Andrew UUC. Went Lafayette, IN. 

CO-12080-S00O-M Editorial Changes Submitted by General 
Conference Delegates. Victor W. GoldsAnudt, St Andrew UUC, West 
Lafayette, IN. 

C8-13061-0070.D Our Preamble. Victor W. Goldachmidt, St 
Andrew UUC, Wett Lafayette, IN. 

C8-120e2-0072-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. Victor W. 
Goldichmidt, St Andrew UUC, West Lafayette, IN. 

CS-120eS-007e-D Our Social Creed. Victor W. Goldachmidt, St 
Andrew UUC, Wat Lafayette, IN. 

C8-12401-0071.D The Issue of Abortion. Victor W. Goldachmidt, 
St Andrews UUC, W. Lafayette, IN. 

FA-12094-0709-D Reeponsibilitiee of the Conference Council on 
Finance and Administration. Victor W. Goldachmidt, St Andrau 
UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

FA-12066.O901-D General Statement on Church Finance. Victor 
W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

FA-12O81-S00O-R Potential Relocation of the General Board of 
Global Ministries. Victor W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat 
Lafayette, IN. 

FM-1206a-00e8-D Our Doctrinal Standards and General Rules. 
Victor W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

FM-12067-0069-D Our Theological Task. Victor W. Goldachmidl, 
St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette. IN. 

FM-13»42-0071-D Human Sexuality. Victor W. Goldachmidt St 
Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

GJ-120e8-027fi-D Laity Sunday. Victor W. Goldachmidt, St 
Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

GJ-120S24000-M 1984 Goal for Doubling Membership by 1992. 
Victor W. Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

GM-120e8-141S-D Purpose and Responsibilities of The National 
Division. Victor W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-12070-0202-D The Church and Pastcral Care. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-12071-0208-D The Local Church as a Connoctional Society. 
Victor W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-12072-0211-D The Meaning of Membership. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-1207S-0261-D Reeponeibilitiee of the Lay Reader. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-12074-026&-D Conunittee on Nominations and Personnel. 
Victor W. Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC. Weat Lafayette, IN. 

LC-12075-0270-D A New Local Church or Mission. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

MN-1207e-0428-D Ri^s and Responsibilities of Members in 
Annual Conference. Victor W. Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat 
Lafayette, IN. 

MN-12O77-O4$0-D The Purpose of Ordination. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

MN-1207B-06SS-D Process of Appointment Making. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

MN-12079-078«-D Board of Ordained Ministry. Victor W. 
Goldachmidt, St Andrew UUC, Weat Lafayette, IN. 

HE-11618-1617-D Membership of the University Senate. 
Administrative Council, Good Shepherd UUC, Benton Ridge, OH. 

HE-liei9-lS18-D Purposes at the University Senate. 
Adminiatrative Board, Good Shepherd UUC, Benton Ridge, OH. 

FM-12866-0071-D The Practice of Homosexuality Considered 
Incompatible with Christian Teaching. Adminiatrative Council, Grace 
Church, Newport KY. 

CS-12426-S00O-R Adoption as an Alternative to Abortion. United 
Uethodiat Women, Grace UUC, Uissoula, UT. 

MN-12242-0424-D Ministers from Otha- Denominations. 
Administrative Council, Grace UUC, Warren, UN. 

LC-11146-02eS-D The CommiUee on Pastor-Parish Relations. 
Doyne E. Graham, Holston Conference. 

MN-111S0-04S1-D Mandatory Retirement Age of Clergy. Doyne 
B. Graham, Holaton Conference. 

C8-12198-0071-D Covenant Relationship. Adminiatratiue 
Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UUC, Atlanta. GA. 



FM-12846-S000-R Study Plan Regarding Homosexuality during 
1993-96. Adminiatrative Council, Grant Park-AldersgaU UUC, 
Atlanta, GA. 

MN-122S8-04O4-D The Ordained Candidates. Adminiatrative 
Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UUC. Atlanta, GA. 

FA-11874-0806-D Fiscal Responsibilities of the Coimdl on 
Finance and Administration. Administrative Council + 26 local 
church boarda and S9 individuals, Gratiot Congregation UUC. 

C8-12406-0071-D Abortion. Adminiatrative Board -H 3 additional 
boarda, Gray UUC, Gray, TN. 

C8-12001-S000-R Concerns oflerael and Palestine. Church and 
Society Committee, Green Traila UUC, Cheaterfield, UO. 

CS-11181-S00O-R Cases Under Which Abortion Should be 
Performed. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

C8-11167-8000-R Abstinence from the Use of Tobacco. Odie 
Gregg, NAL. 

FA-11188-0787-D Retired Ordained Minister, Serving as a Sxipplj 
Pastor. Odie Gregg, NAL. 

FA-11186-8000-R Equitable Salaries for All Ministers. Odie 
Gregg, NAL. 

Equitable Salary for Full-time and Student 

Odie Gregg, NAL. 

The Ministerial Pension Plan. Thomas Griffilh, 



« 



District Parsonage and the Board of TVustees. 



FA-11161-S000-R 

Pastors and Ministers. 

FA-11686-S00O-R 
CAP. 

FA-12S1&-2617-D 
Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

FA-12829-2616-D Real Property Held in Trust by Annual 
Conference Board of Trustees. Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

GJ-12820-2a21-D Additional Chargeable OSenses. Thomaa 
Griffith, CAP. 

GJ-12827-2e26-D Grievance Procedures. Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

LC-121K6-0266-D ResponsibiUtiee of the Administrative Board. 
Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

LC-12822-026&-D The Committee on Pastor-parish Relations. 
Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

MN-12198-044».D Leave of Absence of Ordained Ministers. 
Thomaa Griffith, CAP. 

LC-1189S-0261-D No Local Pastor or Spouse Eligible as Lay 
Member or Alternate. Richard K. Griawold, Firat UUC, Durango, CO. 

LC-12160-0268-D Committee On Nominations and Personnel. 
Richard K. Griawold, First UUC, Durango, CO. 

CO-11 798-061 1-D Duties of General Conference Secretary. 
Ad/ninistrative Board, Groeabeck UUC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GM-11886-1481-D Re^>onsibilities of the World Division. 
Adminiatrative Coimeil, Grove Cify and Laeon, HI UUC, Grove City, 
OB. 

MN-10084-0441-D Support for Ordained Ministries Appointed to a 
Pastoral Charge. Ann Audrey Hagmann, OKL. 

LC-11498-0269-D Committee on Nominations and Pa-6onnal. 
Avia R Bale, North Street UUC, Port Huron, UI. 

MN-1141&-0486-D Appointments to Various Ministries. Thor 
Hall, Holaton Conference Board of Ordained Uiniatry, Chattanooga, TN. 

LC-11101-02e4-D Membershq) ofthe Administrative Board. 
Adminiatrative Board, Bailer Lake UUC, Seattle, WA. 

L£-11148-0247-D Administrative Board Members At Large. 
Adminiatrative Board, BalUr Lake UUC, Seattle, WA. 

LC-11174-0268-D Membership of the Council on Ministries. 
Adminiatrative Board, Bailer Lake UUC, Seattle, WA. 

LC-11176-0269-D The Organizational Structure of the Local 
Church. Adminutrative Board, Bailer Lake UUC, Seattle, WA. 

LC-1216&'026S-D Change Language in Structure of the Local 
Church. Adminiatrative Board, Bailer Lake UUC, Seattle, WA. 

C8-12206-8000-M Support for the United Nations. BomardW. 
Ballman, Betheada, UD. 

FM-1147O-S00O-R United Methodist Understanding B^tism. 
Carl W. Balvoraen, NJY. 

FA-11186-8000-M$ Commission or Study Group to Examine the 
Method of Determining Salaries for Pasters of Local UMCs. David P. 
Hammond, Fair Bluff UUC, Fair Bluff, NC. 

MN-liaSO-0404-D The Certified Candidate. Paul A. Barman HI, 
Grace UUC, Delaware, OB. 

FA-12296.S00O-R Retain General Board of Global Ministries in 
NT at Least Until 1993-96 GCOM Review of all Boards. Pat Callbeck 
Barper, St Paul's UUC, Belena, UL 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



53 



CO-130e6-0623-D The Jurisdictional Ccmferenoe: Juriadictional 
Cofn2nitt«e on Episcopacy. Linda R. BarrU, NDA. 

CS-117gl.S000-R Hsalth Care Program. Luula R fforru. T/DE: 

DI-L2202-0eSS-D The Committee on United Methodist Men. 
Richard VaUn + 23 Other Individual; Barrit Strtet UUC. 
Barritburg, PA. 

DI-122aS-1204-D Jurisdictional Committee on United Methodist 
Men. Richard A. WaUrt + 26 Other IndioiduaU, BarrU Street UUC, 
Barritburg, PA. 

DM23a4-1222-D Duties of United Methodist Men. Richard 
Waters + 22 Other Individual*, Barrit Street UUC, Barritburg, PA. 

DI-1178S-800O-R IVaditionai Language in the Book of Wcrship. 
Linda R. Barrit, NIXA. 

DM18O1-SO0O-R AmendmenU to The Book of Worship. Janiet V. 
Beidinger, II, BOB. 

MN-12138-0M1-D Retired Ordained Minist<rs. Richard B. Bdd, 
KBN. 

MN-13134-0601-D The Task of Stq>erintending. Richard £. ffeU, 
KSN. 

CO-11S48-S000-R Number of lay members of Annual Conference. 
Robert Bellam, Billtop UUC, Seatide, CA. 

DI-llSaS-SOOO-R Oppoee "Oreen Com Ceremony" in the Book of 
Worship. Robert BeUam, Billtop UUC, Seatide, CA. 

DM1408-tOOO-M$ Committee on Older Adult Ministries. Uattie 
Benderton, Oainet UUC, Cincinnati, OB. 

OJ-11841-006»C The Judicial Council. Nyle U. Berthberger. 
Belmont UUC, Johnttown, PA. 

OJ-llM6-2eiK-D Declaratory Decisions. Nyle U Berthberger, 
Belmont UUC, Johnttown, PA. 

MN-12S79-0403-D The Practice of Homosexuality as Being 
Incompatible with the Holy Bible. The Adminittrative Council, 
Bichery Billt and Frankford UUCt, Frankford, DB. 

CO-1226S-S00O-M Praying for God's Will to Prevail at General 
Conference. 26 Individualt, Bigh Street UUC, Lima, OB. 

HN-1168»4>461-D Retirement of Clergy. David A. Bigh/ield, BLT. 

MN-1142(M>4S1-D Remove the Mandatory Retirement Age for 
Clergy. Charlet U. Bill, Paul D. Perry, John Thompson, Garrie 
Stevent and Ralph Uinker. 

FA-12216-S000-M Replace the Wcrd "Apportionment" with 
"Covenant Gifts". Elroy B. Binet, Kantat City, UO. 

FM-11878-S000-R Amendment to the Baptismal Paper. William 
A. Binet + 6 oAer individualt, WOB. 

OM-1214»4000-R General Board of Global Ministries Budget. 
William A. Binet, WOB. 

CO-10191-0726-D Age Level and Family Ministries. BOL, WNC. 

OJ-1106S-A00O-R4 Establishment of a General Board of 
Evangelism. BOL, WPA, WUI. 

FA-10S04400O-R Relocate GBGM. BOL 

LC-10228-0249-D Local Church Officers. BOL 

LC-102S6-2M6-D Merger of Local UM Churches. HOI. 

LC-10280-020e-D Pastoral Charge. Amend 206.1 BOL 

DM2S11-S000-R Season after Pentecost and Kingdomtide service. 
Adminittrative Board and R. Dulaney Barrett, Bolman UUC, Lot 
Angelet, CA. 

HE-110M-«000-M< Task Force to Study Merging Prayer and 
Medicine at United Methodist Hospitals. Kilion Bolmet, Firtt UUC, 
Tulta, OK. 

C8-10O91.OO7O-D Energy Resources Utilization. Kilton Bolmet. 
PoynetU UUC, Poynette, WI. 

CS-110a2-S0OO-Ht Task Force to Examine the Effectiveness of 
Economic BoycotU. Kilton Bolmet, Firtt UUC. Tulta, OK. 

CS-110a8-8000-M$ Task Force to Study the Feasibility of Setting 
up a Distribution Transportation System. Kilion Bolmet, Firtt UUC, 
Tulta, OK 

CS-1116a-«000-Mt Task Force to Con^are Creationism to 
Evolution. Kilton Bolmet, Firtt UUC. Tulta, OK 

CS-11287-SO0O-M< Task Force for Integrated IVanspcrUtion DaU 
Base System Kilton Bolmet, Poynette, WI. 

CS-11288-S00O-M9 Task Force to Study U.S. Japanese Business 
IVactioe and Impact on Trade Relations. Kilton Bolmet, Poynette, WI. 

CS-1128fr«000-M< Task Force to Study Waste Management 
Systems. Kilton Bolmet, Poynette, WI. 

CB-liaSOSOOO-Mt Taak Force to Study the North American Free 
TVade Agreements' Impact on the Western Hemisphere. Kilton 
Bolmet. Poynette, WI. 



CS-11291-S0OO-M* Task Force to Study Cleaning up the 
Environment. Kilton Bolmet, Poynette. WI. 

CS-11292-«000-M$ Task Force to Study the Impact of Trade 
Relations Between the U.S. and Cuba. Kilion Bolmet, Poynette. WI. 

CS-1129»«000-M< Task Force to Study Feasibility of 
TransporUtion fcr UMCOR. Kilton Bolmet, Poynette, WI. 

FM-1108S-S000-M$ Taak Force to Study What Christians Really 
Believe. Kilton Bolmet, Firtt UUC, Tulta, OK. 

GJ-11807-8000-MI Task Force to Find Cost Savings fcr All United 
Methodist Agencies. Kilton Bolmet, Poynette, WI. 

MN-12241-042S-D The Guaranteed Appointment. Jamet W. 
Boltinger Jr., Arlington, VA. 

MN-10087-06S8-D The Prooeee of Appointment Making. Deiuiii 
Boward, Firtt UUC, Guthrie, OK 

MN-11178-0400-D Authority and Duties of Local Pasters. Robert 
U. Britak, WOB. 

FM-10098-0071-D Human Sexuality. Adminittrative Council, 
Bumholdt-Tahle Rock UUC, Bumholdt, NB. 

HE-11672-S000-R Change the Name of Wesley Foundation. FVW 
W. Bunter, Dumat, AR. 

HE-11771-«0OO-M$ Task Force to Study Sophia Theology. Jetut 
Chritt it Lord Tatk Faroe, 9 Adm. Bdt. EPA, Bundngdon Valley UUC, 
Philadelphia, PA. 

H&11772-a000-M< Task Force to Study Feminist Theology. Jetut 
Chritt it Lord Tatk Faroe, 9 Adm. Bdt. EPA, Buntingdon Valley UUC, 
Philadelphia, PA. 

GJ-117e6-8000-M< Task Force to Formulate procedures for 
Resolving Theological Disputes. Jetut Christ it Lard Tatk Force, 9 
Adm. Bd Uemi>er, Buntington Valley UUC, Philadelphia, PA. 

LC-1109»4)10e-D General Ministry of All Christian Believers. 
Adm. Board, Burttboro UUC and Flora R. Upthaw. Overtone Park 
UUC, Fart Worth. TX. 

DM11S3-121»-D Ministry of the Laity. William J. Butt, 
Uethoditt Temple UUC, Evantville, IN. 

FA-12006-SOOO-R Board and Agency Budget Handling. William 
W. Butdiinton, NUX. 

CD-I 1282-0e02-D Composition of the Voting Membership of 
General and Jurisdictional Conferenoes. Nancy Iden and Ruth F. Dion, 
Concord-St Andrewt UUC, Bethetda, Ud. 

CS-110e»«000-R Police Firearms Policies. AUyn fjamt, Atlanla 
UUC, Atlanta, IL. 

CS-1 10efr«000-R Responsible Firearm Ownership and TVaining. 
AUyn Ijamt, Atlanta UUC, Atlanta, IL 

GJ-liei4-2831-D Chargeable Offenses. Council on Uiaittriet, 
Indian River City UUC, Titutville, FL 

CO-llSSe-Oeil-D The Book of Resolutions. Indian River UUC -t- 
6 other local church groupt and 47 individualt. 

CO-11804-0ei2-D The Jurisdictional Conference. 
Inter] uritdictional Committee on Epitcopacy. Baltimore. 

CO-122e2-0eil-D The Jurisdictional Conference. 
Inter] uritdictional Committee on Episcopacy, Severna Park, UD. 

LC-1114»«268-D Committee on Pastor/Staff-Parish Relations. 
Intertharing Board, N.C. Juritdiction Volunteers in Uission Agency, 
Det Uainet, lA. 

FA-lie07-160a-D Power, Duties and Responsibilities of Annual 
Conference. Ruth Ann Ivey, Bethany UUC, Summerville, SC. 

MN-lie28-0S16-D Relationshipof a Diaeonal Minister. Ruth Ann 
Ivey, Bethany UUC, Summerville, SC. 

FA-10SS6-8000-M$ Study of Clergy Salary and Support Structure. 
rWA, DET and NEB. 

CO-1000S-0701-D Clergy Membership of Annual Conference. 
Amend para. 701.1. IWA. 

CO-10004-0701-D Compositionof Annual Conference. Amend 
para. 701.1d. IWA. 

CO-1000S-0701-D Seating of Pastors at Annual Conference. 
Amend para. 701.2 TWA 

CB-10866-80OO-R4 Drug IVafficking and Operations. TWA. 

FA-101124)722-D Basic Salary Plan fcr Clergy. IWA. 

MN-1 0014-04 12-D Clergy Membership of Annual Conference. 
IWA. 

MN-1148fr0424-D Continuance of Full Membership in the Annual 
Conference. JoAnne Jackson. Wilbur and Uargaret Dye, Lakewood 
UUC, Lake Odessa, UI. 

FA-12082-4000-R Standard Salary for Pastors. William U. 
Jeffries. NCA. 



54 



May 5, 1992 



DI-lllSO-MOO-R Service of In&nt Dedication. Uichad Johnson, 
BLT. 

MN-11821-0618-D Limitation on Years of Service for District 
Superintendents. W. Garrett Judton, NNY. 

CO-10SlS4)e27-D The Official Journal of the Jurisdictional 
Conference. JurUdictionah (?). 

DI-12171-S0OO-R Addition to the Proposed Book of Worship. 
SUuen Kaehr, NJN. 

MN-12240-0418-D Conference and District Board of Ordained 
Ministry. Tereaea Keexl, Dinwiddxe UMC, Dinwiddle, VA. 

CS-1118<M00O-R Association With and Support to, the Religious 
Coalition for Abortion RighU. Glenn Keller, VIR. 

MN-12247-0788-D Election of Lay Members on the Board of 
Ordained Ministry. Joan T. Kelsey, Univeraiiy UMC, Ea»t Lansing, MI. 

MN-12248-0752-D Membership of the Board of Ordained Ministry. 
Joan T. KeUey, Univertity UMC, East Lansing, MI. 

FA-1020S-0906-D Fiscal Responsibilities Regarding Abortioa. 
KEN. 

6M-10218-1411-D Composition of Board of TVusteee of Mission 
Agencies and Institutions. KEN. 

HE-10878-SOOO-R Scholarshq) Endowment Fund. KEN. 

MN-10248-4M81-D Qualifications for Ordination. KEN. 

CO-1128S-4000-R Indusivenees of the Physically Challenged at 
All Conferencefi. Mary Louise Kendall, St Paul UMC, EUiohethtown, 
PA. 

FM-12«e<W)071-D Human Sexuality. BurrdlM. Ketcker»id,BOL 

DI-11941-S0OO-M Discontinue Use of Term "Act of God". Arthur 
R. Kirk, EOB. 

GJ-1166&40OO-R The Mission Society for United Methodist as a 
Mission Organization. Arthur R. Kirk, EOH. 

GJ-117a»^000-R Institute "One Member, One Vote" Democracy 
for our Church. Arthur R. Kirk, Cambridge UMC, Cambridge, OH. 

GJ-120&1-S0OO-M Reduce Administration of the United Methodist 
Church. Arthur R Kirk, EOH. 

HE-11678-S000-R Cease Giving Bachelcr's Degrees. Arthur R 
Kirk, EOH. 

FA-116a2-8000-R Formula for ApportionmenU. Artfcur Erk 4 
the Finance Committee of Providence, EOH. 

MN-119O4-S00O-R Call on Bishops to Clarify Terms Renewed, 
Redeemed Consultation. Catherine Kirk, TEN. 

GJ-1I270-0806-D Add Lesbians and Gay Men to Membership of 
Program Boards and Agencies. Alice Knotts + 8 other individuals, 
Denver, CO. 

GJ-11620-027S-D Special Sunday to Pray for the President of the 
United States. K Henry Koestline, FLA. 

GJ-11621-0801-D National and General Agencies. K Henry 
Koestline, FLA. 

MN-11277-0416-D Requirements for Admittance to Probationary 
Membership. James F. Kremer, CPA. 

CO-10187-O701-D Voting Rights of Local and AssociaU Pastors. 
KSEandDET. 

MN-10260-O7S8-D Ordained Associate Members as Observers of 
Board of Ordained Ministry. KSE. 

MN-102e6-0752-D Participation of Observers in the Work of the 
Board KSE. 

CO-10S8(M00O-M District Listing in the General Minutes. KSW. 

FA-10S81-SOOO-R Ministanal Pension Plan. KSW. 

FM-1221»«000-R Amend the Study on Baptism Refxart. Council 
on Ministries, Lacon UMC, Laoon, IL. 

C8-11402-S00O-R The "Memphis Declaration". Administrative 
Board, Lakeside UMC, Lake Village, AR. 

MN-11642-0424-D Requirements for Admission. Council on 
Ministries + 3 individuals, Lakewood UMC, Lake Odessa, MI. 

CS-110e44000-R Reorganize The United Nations. Allen C. 
Lambert, ORL 

MN-11689-0461-D Retirement of Clergy Members, ffonier W. 
Landis and Division of Chaplains, VIR. 

FM-12Se7-0071-D Human Sexuality. Administrative Boards, 
Laton and Aromona UMCa, Laton, CA. 

MN-1224e-0618-D Limitations on Years of Service. Bishop David 
J. Lawson, WIS. 

MN-11961-O406-D Church Membership of Part-Time Local 
Pastors. Administrative Board, Lawsonham and Rimersburg UMCs. 

MN-11279-Ofiie-D Hi^er Education .^pcrtiomnenta. Church 
Conference, Leander UMC, Leander, TX. 



FM-12S74-0071-D Oppose Any Action Making Homosexuality 
Compatible with Christian Teaching. Administrative Council, 
Leavitisville UMC, Dellroy, OH. 

FM-12217-00e8-D The Article of Religion. June Leckrone, 
Portsmouth, VA. 

LC-11S27-0266-D Organization of the Administrative Board. 
Denms R. Lee, SCA. 

MN-12249-S000-H Support the Report of the Study on Ministry. 
Jo Ann Leifeste, Herndon UMC, Herndon, VA. 

MN-12284-0431-D Requirements for Ordination. Laura Lentell + 
9 Other Individuals, Milton, FL. 

CS-12087-1104-D Re^jonsibilitiee of the GBCS. Ralph J. Lepley, 
WNC. 

FA-11661 -0709-0 Conference Council on Finance and 
AdminiEtration. Ralph J. Lepley, WNC. 

MN-11S17-0441-D Support for Ordained Ministers Appointed to a 
Pastcral Charge. Ralph J. Lepley, WNC. 

CS-12428-S00O-R Opposition to a Call for a Constitutional 
Convention. Lifewatch Task Force of UM on Abortion, Bryan, TX. 

FM-1228S4000-R$ Resources for Healing Ministries with 
Homosexuals. € Local Church Groups + 42 Individuals. 

CO-116d4-0606-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. 1 Member, Long's 
UMC, Lake Junaluska, NC. 

CS-12S994000-R Social Principle Statement on Abortion. Bishop 
Richard C. Looney, SGA area. 

GJ-12186-2028-D Investigations Procedures. Bishop Richard C. 
Looney, SCA. 

CS-11860-8000-R The Requirement of Blood Testing Prior to 
Marriage. Conference Church and Society + 12 indiwduals, LRK 

FM-10611-S00O-R Retain the Term, Practice and Service of Infant 
BaptUm. LRK CNV, EPA, NNY. 

IC-10S64-S000-R Support the Effcrte of Consultation on Church 
Union. LRK 

CS-1140S-SOOO-R Membership in Club cr Organizations whidi 
Practice Exclusivity. Commission on Religion, and Race and COM., 
LVL. 

IC-1 1492-2201 -D Support the Wcrk and Urge Continuance of 
General Commission on the Status and Role of Women. Conference 
COSROW and Theodore Agnew, OK LVL 

FA-lOlOe-0709-D Funding Church Building Fadlitiee and 
Programs for Accessibility. LVL. MNN. 

GJ-10120-0275-D Special Sundays without Church-wide 
Offerings. Access Sunday. LVL, NIN, MNN. 

LC-1007W)282-D Responsibilitiee of the Coordinator of 
Communications. LVL, NIN. 

CO-101S8-0746-D Committee on Ministry to Persons with 
Handicapping Conditions. LVL. 

FA-1096S-S00O-R Accessibility &r Perams with Handicapping 
Conditions. LVL, NIN. 

GJ-11040-SOOO-R ObeervanceofDr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 
LVL. 

IX%10141-02a2-D Annual Accessibility Audit. LVL 

LC-10140-2MS-D Rights of Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. LVL. 

MN-10044-050S-D Offices of Bishops and District 
Superintendents. LVL. 

MN-10166-0489-D ResponaibUitiee and Duties of a Pastor. LVL. 

CO-114S5-0607-D Term of Service for Bishops in Their Area. 
Howard Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX. 

CO-11469-S000-R Terms Used in the Book of Discipline. Howard 
Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX 

CO-119SS-S000-M Commend Rev. Donald E. Wildman f<T his 
Efforts Regarding Sex and Homosexuality in the Media. Howard 
Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX 

C8-11989-0070-D The Pure Unfamented Juice of the Grape in 
Holy Communion. Howard Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX 

DI-1147O-SO0O-R Include the Hymn Eternal Father, Strong to 
Save in the Next Printing of the United Methodist Hymnal. Howard 
Lydick, Eleanor HamJett, J. Hamlett, First UMC, Richardson, TX 

DI-11471.«000-R Inclusion in the Next Printing of the United 
Methodist Hymnal. Howard Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX. 

DM1472-S000-R Omit the 4th verse of the Hymn Praise to llie 
Lord, The Almighty. Howard Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX 

DM19S(VS0OO-R Amend Wording of Service tar Holy Communion 
in Hymnal. Howard Lydick, First UMC, Richardson, TX. 



< 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



66 



FM-12S4S.S000-R No Practicing Homoeezual to be Utilized as 
Paid Staffer Volunte«r. Howard Lydick, Fint UMC, Richardton, TX. 

QJ-1 1708-0804-0 Travel of Members of General Boards and 
Agmcies. Howard Lydick, Firtt UUC, Richardson, TX. 

aj-1210S-2e21-D Chargeable Offenses. Howard Lydick, Fir»t 
UUC. Richardson, TX. 

aj-12274-2a21-D Chargeable Offenses Regarding Alcoholic 
Beverages. Howard Lydick, Firtt UUC, Richardson. TX. 

HN-11S01-060&-D Retirement Age of Bishops. Howard Lydick, 
Firtt UUC, Richardson, TX. 

CS-1220O4>000-R The Political Conunvmity and Military Service. 
U.D. Lyons, Rainbow City UUC, Rainbow City, AL. 

CS-12849-0070-D The Natural World. District Supt, Pastor and 
Lay Leaders. lotion Sprin^t, Fentress and Prairie Lea UUCs, Austin. 
TX. 

CS-11812-0072-D Rights of Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. Administrative Council, Uain Street UUC, Alton, Uj. 

C8-1217(M0OO-K National Health Insurance Program. 
Administrative Council, Uain Street UUC, Alton, IL. 

FA-11942-S00O-R Limit Apportionments to 2% Increase. 
Administrative Council, Uain Street UUC, Alton, IL. 

MN-10088-04SO-D Pastoral Appointment. Amend para. 436. Ra>. 
Harry B. Uann, FLA. 

FM-1U68-0071-D Marriage a Shared Fidelity Between a Man and 
a Woman. Rev. and Urs. Arthur L Uansure, DSW. 

tfN-11400-0480-D SUtement on Ordination. Rev. and Urs. 
Arthur L Uansure, DSW. 

CS-11464-8000-R Oppose Food and Medicine Blockade or 
Embargoes. UARCHA. 

FA-11475-S000-R Health Insurance for Ministers. UARCHA, 
Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

GJ-11484-8000-R New Beginning. UARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

OM-11486-8000-R Support the National Plan for Hispanic 
Ministry including Funding. UARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

OM-1 14874000-R Access of Hispanics to Hi^er Education. 
UARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

OH-12162-S000-R Puerto Rico Colonial SUtus. UARCHA, Perth 
Amhoy, NJ. 

OM-1216S-8000-R Affiliated Autonomous Methodist Church of 
Puvto Rico and The United Methodist Church. UARCHA, Perth 
Amhoy, NJ. 

OM-12164-S000-R Continuance of Funding to the Evangelical 
Seminary of Puerto Rico. UARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

OM-12ie6-SOOO-R Understanding The United Methodist Church 
•• a Global Church. ifARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

IC-11786-S00O-R Celebrate and AfBrm the Work of GCORR. 
UARCHA, Perth Amhoy, NJ. 

IC-11786-S00O-R Celebrate and Support the Work of the General 
Commission on the Status and Role of Women. UARCHA, Perth 
Amhoy, NJ. 

MN-11584-O404-D Candidacy for Ordained Ministry. 
Administrative Beard, Uarion UUC, Uarion, AL. 

HN-10104-04S1-D Qualifications for Ordination. Pastor and 
Officers, UarkU UUC, Uarkle, IN. 

IC-11481-200S-D Responsibilities of GCCUIC. Susan Uarsh, 
Kokomo. IN. 

C8-1240S-0071-D The Nurturing Community and Abortion. Vidti 
Uartin. Wesley UUC. Parsons, KS. 

C8-12181-0078-D The Economic Community and Gambling. 
Anne K. Uartz, North Bethetda UUC, Bethesda, UD. 

FH-12866-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 71F. John A. 
Uason, WVA. 

LC-1208»O261-D Tenure of Office. John A. Uason, WVA. 

C8-12418-0072-D Rights of the Unborn. Pamela Uaurer. St Luke 
UUC, Kokomo, IN. 

GJ-11211-0818-D Election of the General Secretary of Each Board 
and Agency. Hatel UcDaniel, Roswell UUC, Roswell, OA. 

OJ-11214-1006-D Election of General Secretaries. Haiel 
UcDanUl. Roswell UUC, Roswell, OA. 

CO-1I84&4000-R Inclusivenees at General and Jurisdictional 
Conferancee. Walter H. UcKdvey, WNC. 

MN-lie86-0448-D Voluntary Leave of Absence. AobertC. 
UcKibben, AFL. 

HN-116S»044»-D Call to Active MiUtary Duty. Robert C. 
UcKihben, AFL 



MN-116S7-04M-D Base for Complaints. John Patton Ueadowt, 
Pleasant HUl UUC, UcCalla, AL 

OJ-1148S-2621-D Chargeable Offensee. John Patten Ueadows, 
Pleasant Hill UUC, UcCalla, AL 

MN-12246-046S-D The Grievance Process. John Patton Ueadows, 
Pleasant Hill UUC, UcCalla, AL 

CO-12197-0701-D Lay and Clerical Delegatee Voting Rights. 
Otorge C Uegill, NCA. 

IX:-121S7-0262-D To Permit the Local Coordinator of 
Communications to Record a Video History of the Congregation. Virgil 
G. Uegill, NOA. 

LC-12267-2S42-D Repairs and Upkeep of Church Property. Board 
of Trustees, Uelrose Avenue UUC, Roanoke, VA. 

CO-11425-0702-D Conference Committee on Scheduling. Lay 
members of Annual Conference, UEU. 

FA-12818-S00O-R Church Owned Agricultural and Other Rural 
Property. National UU Rural Fellowship Legislature Committee, UEU. 

FA-1020O4)726-D Shared Salary Options. UEU, WVA, NYK. 

C8-10845-S000-R4 Education on Alcohol and Substance Abuse. 

HE-10S74-8000-R Development of Programs on Campus Ministry. 
UEU. 

MN-102S7-0817-D Diaconal Ministers. UEU. 

OJ-12104-2a22-D Filing of Charges Against a Member of The 
United Methodist Church. Donald E. Uesser, IH/f School of Theology, 
Denver, CO. 

GJ-12106-262S-D Investigative Procedures. Donald E. Uesser, 
Riff School of Theology, Denver, CO. 

CS-1146S-80OO-M$ Task Force on the American Free IVade 
Agreement. Uelh. Assoc, to represent Cause of Hispanic Amer., Perth 
Amhoy, NJ. 

FA-12298-S0OO-R Continue Present Location of General Board of 
Global Ministries in New York. Uelh. Fed for Soc. Action, 8 Church 
Org., 72 Ind, Bozenuxn, UT. 

FM-12S48-0072-D Rights of Lesbians and Gay Men. Ueth. Fed 
for Social Action + Ad Council, Grant Park-Aldersgate UUC, Atlanta, 
OA. 

CS-114e(VS0OO-R Bilingual Education. Uethodist Assoc, to 
represent Hispanic Americans. 

MN-12S81.O402-D Human Sexuality. Delete para. 402.2. 
Uethodist Federation for Social Action, NY & UN, + i Administrative 
Board 

C8-lie74-S000-R Justice for Reverend Alex Awad. Uethodist 
Federation for Social Action, Staten Island, NY. 

C8-11675-S000-R Nuclear Weapons Production at the General 
Electric Company. Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Staten 
Island, NY. 

CS-lie7&«000-R Investment Ethics. Uethodist Federa^n for 
Social Action, Staten Island NY. 

CS-lie77-8000-R National Health Care. Uethodist Federation for 
Social Action, Staten Island NY. 

FA-11681-0726-D Share Salary Option. Uethodist Federation for 
Social Action, Also the Uinnesota Chapter, Staten Island, NY. 

FA-lie8S-ie04-D Corporate Responsibility and the General Board 
of Pensions. Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Statai Island, NY. 

FA-lie84-2612-D Annual Conference Investment Stewardship. 
Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Staten Island NY. 

FA-122S8-2S28-D Local Church Investment Stewardship. 
Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Staten Island, NY. 

FA-1281O400O-R No Curb on Discussion on Homosexuality. 
Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Dumharton UUC and Robert 
Simison. 

IC-lie8ft.8000-R Holy Land Tours. Uethodist Federation for 
Social Action, StaUn Island NY. 

LC-1217»0202-D The Local Church and EcoJustice. Uethodist 
Federation for Social Action, Stolen Island, NY. 

LC-12228-020S-D The United Methodist Church Celebrates the 
Diversity of its Members. Uethoditt Federation for Social Action, 
Staten Island NY. 

MN-12188-0414-D Qualifications for Election to Probationary 
Membership. Uethodist Federation for Social Action, Staten Island 
NY. 

FA-12287-8000-R Establish the National Association of United 
Methodist Retired Persons. 77 Individual Uembert of the Pention Plan. 



66 



May 6, 1992 



C8-11782-8000-R Nuclear Disarmament: The Zero Option. 
Methodists United for Peace with Justice, Washington, DC. 

LC-12161-02e9-D Committee and/or Employing Agency . Patricia 
Ann Meyers, Diaoonal Ministers of Oregon-Idaho Conference. 

FA-11S82-0921-D Spiritual Growth. Jane Allen Middleton and 
Oeorge Douglas McClain, Staten Island, NY. 

MN-lie91-042S-D Spiritual Growth. Jane Allen Middleton and 
Oeorge Douglas McClain, Staten Island, NY. 

MN-11688-044S-D Spiritual Growth. Jane Allen Middleton and 
Oeorge Douglas McClain, Staten Island, NY. 

MN-1168<M)620-D Dutiee of the District Superintendent. Jane 
Allen Middleton and George Douglas McClain, Staten Island, NY. 

MN-1168e-1629-D Reeponsibilitiee of the Board of Ordained 
Ministry. Jane Allai Middleton and George Douglas McClain, Staten 
Island, NY. 

CO-12481-008K-C Composition of Annual Conference. Chita R. 
Millan, Vinluan Memorial UMC, Pangasinan, Philippines. 

DI-11861-4000-R Introduction to lection in the lectionary. 
Clarence P. Miller. WOK 

08-11878-0072-0 Rights of the Unborn. Dewey Miller, NIN. 

LC-12828-8000-R The Committee on Nominations. Milton M. 
Miller. KSE. 

FA-11480-1716-D Net Income from the United Methodist 
Publishing House. Perry S. Miller, WNC. 

FA-114S1-S000-R Clergy Status for Income Tax Purposes. Perry 
S. MilUr, WNC. 

LC-11680-0288-D Pastor's Report at Charge Conference. Perry S. 
MilUr, WNC. 

LC-11S81-0247-D Pastor's Report to Charge Conference. Perry S. 
Miller, WNC. 

CO-12020-OeiO-D Speaking for the Church. Roland Dean Miller, 
Christ Church UMC, Louisville, KY. 

GJ-1208S-8000-R Policies Relative to Socially Responsible 
Investments. Roland Dean Milla; Christ Church UMC, Louisville, KY. 

MN-12896-0402-D Retain Paragraph 402 Regarding 
Homosexuality. Adm. Bd + 90 local church ffvups + 64S individuals, 
Milnor UMC, Milnor, ND. 

LC-11882-2640-D Local Church Property. Ministry Development 
Committee, Fayetteville, NC. 

LC-11888-2S60-D Study of Local Church Potential. Ministry 
Development Comm-ittee, Native American International Caucus, 
Fayetteville, NC. 

MN-12826-0S18-D Conference Relationship of Diaconal Members. 
Ralph L Minker, V7R. 

MN-11889-0404-D Candidacy for Ordained Ministry. United 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-11881-0420-D Requirement for Election as Associate 
Members. United Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

CS-10281-SOOO-R A Resolution on Investments Policy. MNE. 

FA-10069-ie04-D Pensions and Investment Policies. MNE. 

MN-10727-8000-S$ Study Commission to Revisit the Effective Role 
of National Bishops. MNE. 

1X7-1 02S4-264S-D Planning and Financing Requirements for Local 
Churches. MNN and NIN. 

LC-118784)261-D The Chairperson of Worship. United Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-11886-0804-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. United 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-1188S-0401-D Ministry in the Christian Church. United 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-11880-0414-D Election to Probationary Membership. United 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-11888-0424-D Requirements for Admission. United Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-118M-0424-D Requirements for Admission. United Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

MN-11886-0481-D Qualifications fca- Ordination. United 
Methodist Federation for Social Action, MNN. 

IX!-1022a<>208-D Acc^ting the Diversity of Church Members. 
MNN, WIS. 

FA-10206-2S12-D Annual Conference Board of Trustees. MNN, 
WYO,NYK. 

CS-10288-800O-R Population Policy. MNN. 

C8-10844-8000-R Enwgy Policy. MNN. 

C8-1099(M000.R Hate Crimes. MAW. 



FA-10066-0787-D Proportional Payments. MNN. 

FA-10058-0026-D Episcopal Budget. MNN. 

FA-101104)719-D Apportionments and Equitable Salary Fund. 
MNN. 

FA-10198-0721-D Basic Salary Plan for Clergy. MNN. 

FA-10204-ieO4-D Corporate ReeponsibiUty and the General Board 
of Pensions. MNN. 

FA-102e8-0906-D Fiscal Responsibilities. MNN. 

GJ-10872-8000-R Church-wide Tear of Remembrance, Repentance 
and Renewal. MNN. 

HE-10991-S00O-R Peace Studies Scholarships. MNN. 

LC-1006S-0247-D Recording Secretary of Charge Conference. 
MNN. 

LC-1 0009-0247-0 Members at Large of the Administrative Board / 
Council. MNN. 

LC-10074-0266-O Reeponsibilitiee of the Administrative Board. 
MNN. 

LC-10188-0249-O Local Church Offices and Chairpa-sonship. 
MNN. 

LC-10229-0261-O Definitions of the Chairman of the 
Administrative Board of Council. MNN. 

LC-10280-02Se-O Adequate Housing for the Pastor. MNN. 

LC-10288-2682-D Local Church Board of Trustees. MNN. 

LC-10819-0282-D Interpreters for Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. MNN. 

MN-10079-0804-D Candidacy for Diaconal Ministry. MNN. 

MN-10081-O404-O The Declared Candidate for Ordained Ministry. 
MNN. 

MN-10244-O424-D Requirements for Admission in an Annual 
Conference. MNN. 

MN-1026S-0788-O Dutiee of Annual Conference Board of 
Ordained Ministry. MNN. 

MN-10821-0421-O Rights of Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. MNN. 

MN-10998-0762-O Lay Members on the Board of Ordained 
Ministry. MNN. 

FA-12884-0900-O Discussion, Debate, or Education Regarding 
Homosexuality. Board of Church and Society. MOE. 

FA-12028-0726-O Shared Compensation Option. Conference 
Board of Church and Society, MOE. 

OI-11428-S000-R$ Stewardship Initiative in the 1993-96 
Quadrennium. National Association of Stewardship Leaders, MOB, 
CNVandEOH. 

MN-1025&4)614-R Reeponsibilitiee of Bishops. MOE, NEB. 

CO-10182-0e29-O Jurisdictional Council on Ministriee. MOE. 

CO-10188-0720-O Annual Conference Council on Ministries. 
MOE. 

CO-108ei-8000-M$ Task Force to Study Jurisdictional System and 
Demographics. MOE. 

GJ-10210-1001-O Eliminate Structure of GCOM. MOE. 

GM-10212-0742-O Annual Conference Commission on the Small 
Membership Church. MOE. 

LC-10217-020e-O Annual Conference Plan f<r Cooperative Parish 
Ministries. DET and MOE. 

MN-10167-O44e-O Ministers Sabbatical Leave. MOE. 

MN-102S1-O487-D Part-time Appointment of Full-time Pastors. 
MOE. 

MN-102S2-0487-O Interim AppointmenU. MOE. 

MN-10266-OS14-D Specific Responsibilities of Bishops. MOE. 

MN-10267-0688-D Pastors Appointed to Rural Congregations. 
MOE. 

MN-10262-0786-D Annual Conference Committee on Episcopacy. 
MOE. 

MN-1 0268-0762-D Laity as Members of District Board of Ordained 
Ministers. MOE. 

MN-10271-1628-O Laity to the Division of Ordained Ministry of 
the GBHE and Ministry. MOE. 

MN-10SS6-S000-M$ Study of Bishq>'B Relationship to Annual 
Conference. MOE. 

FA-11606-0710-O Separate World Service Funds from Conference 
Benevolences Funds. MonticeUo District Council on Ministries, Little 
Rock. AR. 

CS-11261-8000-R Oppose the Violence and Profanity Displayed on 
Television. (Council on Ministries, Moody Memorial First UMC, 
Galveston. TX. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



57 



MN-12ia2-8000-R Diaconal Ministar'a Relatioiubip to the 
Employing Agency. Eleanor K. Morrow, An n a n daU UliC, Annondede, 
VA. 

IC-10064-2201-D Delete the Organization and Responsibility of 
the Conunieeion on the Status and Role of Women. Adnu Board, 
Lamua Palort Cluster A Bd. of Steward, St Oak UUC, Mitchellville, 
MD. 

CB-I002O4000-R Parental Family Responsibility. AdminUtrative 
Board, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

CS-10021-S000-R Responsible Parenthood. Adminietratiue Board, 
Mount Oak UMC. Mitchellville, MD. 

FA-11074-0912-D The World S<rvice Fund. Adminittradve 
Board, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

OJ-10022-1001-D Eliminate the Organization and Responsibility 
of GCOM. Administrative Board, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

GJ-1002S.O806-D Eliminate Additional Membership to General 
Boards. Administrative Board, Mount Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

CrJ-10024-0806-D Committee to Nominate Additional Members. 
Adm. Board A Comm. to Nominate Additional Members, Mount Oak 
UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

HE-1012&-1S17-D Member and Organization Senate. 
Administrative Board, ML Oak UMC A First UMC, Mitchellville A 
Blackwell, MDAOK 

HE-10180-1618-D Purposes and Objectives of the University 
Senate. Administrative Board, ML Oak UMC, Marilyn Thompson, 
Mitchellville, MD., Starksville, MS. 

Ea:-10181-lfil9-D Affiliation of Theological Seminaries. 
Administrative Board, ML Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

, IC-1006S-2001-D Eliminate General Commission on Christian 
Unity and Interreligious Concerns. Administrative Board A Board of 
SUwards, Mount Oak UMC A First UMC, Mitchellville A Qriffin, MD 
AQA. 

LC-1 0070-024 7-D Notifying the Local Church of Amount 
Apportioned for World Service and Conference Benevolence. 
Administrative Board, ML Oak UMC, Mitchellville, MD. 

MN-10029-0788-D Duties of Conference Board of Ordained 
Ministry. Amend para. 733.2. Administrative Board, Mount Oak UMC, 
Mitchellville, MD. 

CO-10006^72ft-D Age Level and Family Councils. Amend para. 
726.6. MOW. CNV, NEB, SOA, TRY, KSW, K8E, AFL, SNJ, NAL. 

FA-10S88-SOOO-R Justice Issues of Clergy Salary System. MOW. 
NCA. 

CS-12289-0000-D Non Support for Unrestricted Abortions. 
Administrative Council, Moyock UMC, Moyock, NC. 

DI-1129»«000-D| Establish a Committee on Older Adult 
Ministry. Older Adult Ministry, MSS. 

CO-1219S-0086-C Membership to College Age Level. Statewide 
Student Council, MSS. 

DI-10e8»«000-M Study of the Holy Spirit. MSS. 

FA-10201.O787-D Proportional Payments for Retired Ministers. 
MSS. 

FA-10S06-SOOO-R Relocating the General Board of Global 
Ministries. MSS. 

OJ-1082S-S000-R Gospel Call to a New Beginning. MSS. 

GJ-1098e4000-R The Celebration of Pentecost. MSS. 

GM-1002(V8000-R4 Mission in the Local Community Enabling 
Resolution. MSS. 

GM-10876-8000-R Resourcing Black Churches in Urban 
Communities. MSS. 

MN-10S2(M0OO-R Authority and Rights of Lay, Local and 
Associate Pastors. MSS. 

MN-10411-SOOO-R Recruitment and Development Plan for Local 
Pastors. MSS. 

CS-1 1666-SOOO-R Boycott of Motion Pictures and T. V. Programs 
That Show Violence. Church and Society Committee, MtHope UMC, 
Lansing, MI. 

PA-11082-SOOO-R Relocation of the General Board of Global 
Ministriee. Administrative Board, ML Pleasant UMC, Winchester, VA. 

LC-100S7-Q2d8-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
Amend para. 269.L. Rev. Douglas Mullins, WOH. 

DI-11429-1801-D Global Mission Outreach. Administrative 
Board, Munsey Memorial UMC. Johnson City, TN. 

FM-114SS-S00O-R Support the Recommendation of the Study 
Committee on Understanding Baptism. Administrative Board, Munsey 
Memorial UMC. Johnson City, TN. 



MN-11440-8000-R Delay Action on the Ministry Study until the 
1996 General Conference. Administrative Board, Muns^ Memorial 
UMC, Johnson City. TN. 

FA-10800-8000-M$ Translating Book of Disciples into Hauaa 
Language. MUR. 

FA-I0801-S000-M( Translate UMC Hymnal into Hausa Language. 
MUR. 

PA-10S02-8000-M$ IVanslate Book of Worship into Hausa 
Language. MUR. 

FM-11478-006d.D The Word "Christian" be Given a Specific 
Definition. Pastor and organizations. Mustang UMC, Mustang, f 

GJ-lie87-S000-R Streamline Church Bureaucracy Place in 
Council of Bishops. Administrative Board. Myrtle drove UMC, 
Pensaoola, FL. 

FM-118804000-M Baptismof All Christian Children. Steven C. 
Nadwomy, Center UMC, Saugus, MA. 

FA-1011ft«90e-D Human Sexuality. Retain Present Stand on 
Funding "Gay" Caucus or Group. NAK +11 other Annual 
Conferences. 

H&1061S-8000-R9 Adopt "Campus Ministry: Mission at the 
Center" Special Program for 1993-96. NAK -I- 29 other Annual 
Conferences. 

FA-10808-8000-R Support Relocating the OBGM. NAK, AFL. 
GIL and TEX. 

CO-10046-0701-D Annual Conference Membership of Local 
Pastors. NAK 

CO-10046-0701-D Composition of Annual Conference. NAK 

IC-10860.8000-R Continue the Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women. NAK. 

IC-10S51-S0OO-R Retain the Commission on Religion and Race. 
NAK 

LC-100714)2S1-D Dutiee of Church Lay Reader. NAK 

MN-1008S-04S1-D Qualifications for Ordination. NAK 

MN-1168S4786-D Conference Committee on Episcopacy. NAK 

CO-11806-0702-D Election of the Conference Lay Leader. 
Committee of the Laity. NAL 

LC-11876-0249^D Chair of the Committee on Nominations and 
Personnel. Committeeof the Laity, NAL 

LC-11880-O269-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
Committee of the Laity, NAL 

FA-11120-0710-D World Service and Conference Benevolence. 
General Conference Delegation, NAL 

FA-11122-8000-R General Budget Funding. Oeneral Conference 
Delegation. NAL 

DM084ft«000-R4 Spiritual Directors Program. NAL CAP, MEM. 
IWA and MNN. 

MN-11461-8000-R The Study of Ministry Dealing with the Office 
of Deaconesses. NaL Assoc. /^Deaconesses and Home Missionaries, + 
60 individuals. 

OJ-12809-8000-R Program to Emphasize Inclusivenees in All 
Dimensions of the Church. National and Western Jurisdictional 
BMCR. 

CO-12021-O702-D Organization of Annual Conference. National 
Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NB. 

CO-12060-0720-D Annual Conference Council on Ministry. 
National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NB. 

DM202S-0729-D Conference Board of Discipleship. National 
Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NE. 

DI-12024-07S0-D Conference Board of Laity. National Assoc of 
Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NE. 

DI-1202S-0748-D Coordinating Committee on Lay Work. 
National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NE. 

DM202e-0758-D The District Board of Laity. National Assoc of 
Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield. NE. 

DI-12027-1218-D Leadership and Ministry Development. 
National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NE. 

LC-12041-026S-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NB. 

MN-12048-0788-D Membership of the Conference Board of 
Ordained Ministry. National Assoc, of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, 
Springfield, NE. 

MN-12049-0762-D The District Committee on Ordained Ministry. 
National Assoc of Annual Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield, NB. 



58 



May 5, 1992 



MN-1206O40OO-R Amendment to the Ministry Study Regarding 
Ordination. Natiotial Assoc of Annual Conference hay headers, 
Springfield, NE. 

GJ-lieiK-SOOO-R S«rvioe of Revival and Commitment. iyTotiorui/ 
Association of Conference Presidents and. Five UMM Jurisdictional 
Presidents. 

GM-12225^000-M$ Study Committee for Asian - American 
Language Ministries. National Feda-ation of Asian-American U.M., 
San Francisco, CA. 

LC-llS8d-0266-D Organization of the Administrative Board. 
National Federation of Asian-American U. M., San Francisco, CA. 

LC-1184a'2662-D Shared Church Facilities. National Federation 
of Asian-American U.M., San Francisco, CA. 

MN-11844A)617-D Administration of and Ministering to 
Language Churches. National Federation of Asian-American U.M., 
San Francisco, CA. 

GM-114064000-R Native American History and Contemporary 
Culture as Related to Effective Church Participation. National United 
Methodist Native American Center. 

GM-11406-S0OO-R4 Shared Financial Support for the Native 
American Center. National UnitedMethodist Native American Center. 

GM-11407-S0OO-R4 Increased Support for Programs Impacting 
Higher Education of Native Americans. National United Methodist 
Native American Center. 

GM-11408-8000-R Native American Representation in the United 
Methodist Church. National United Methodist Native American Center. 

CO-121290746-D Committee on Native American Ministry. 
Native American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GJ-121S6-0274'D Native American Awareness Sunday. Native 
American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12187-S00O-R A New Beginning. Native American 
International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-121S8-14S0-D Sovereign Indian Nations Within the U.S. 
Native American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12188-1481-D Reeponsibilitieeofthe World Division. Native 
American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12140-1482-D Authority of the World Division. Native 
American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GH-12141-1487-D Administration of New Commitment. Native 
American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12142-8000-M$ Study on the Building of Community in Rural 
Native American Communities. Native American International 
Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12148-S0OO-R Native American Young Adults in Mission. 
Native American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12144-S0OO-R Native American Social Witness Program. 
Native American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12146-400O-R^ Education Responsibilities Concerning Native 
American Cultural Traditions. Native American International Caucus, 
Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-1214e-S00O-R| Native American School of Evangelism. 
Native American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-12147-S000-R9 Pastoral Care and the Aids Epidemic in 
Native American Communities. Native American International 
Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

GM-121484000-R< National Convocation on the Ordained 
Ministry for Native Americans. Native American Inta-national 
Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

IC-llSeS-SOOO-R Retain the Commission on the Status and Role 
of Women. Black Methodist for Church Renewal, NCA. 

IC-11862-8000-R Retain Religious Race. Commission on Status 
and Role of Women and BMCR, NCA. 

CS-10e84-S00O-R Research the AIDS Situation. NCA. 

FM-10612-8000-R Support Present Stand on Homosexuality. 
NCA. 

FM-10614-02ie-D Retain Confirmation Classes as Prerequisite to 
Full Membership. NCA. 

CO-114&4-0606-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. NCJ and IlL Area 
Committee on the Episcopacy. 

CO-11248-0ei2-D The Functions of the Interjurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy. NCJ, WJ, & III area Committees on 
Episcopacy. 

CO-11778-0606-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. NDK 

FA-1097(V8000-M$ Church Owned Agricultural Land and Real 
Estate. NEB. MOE, DET. 



MN-10169-040e-D Authorities and Duties of a Local Pastor. NEB, 
OKh, MOE, HOh 

C8-10102-0072-D Driving Unda- the Influence. NEB. 

C8-10624-8000-R Driving Under the Influence. NEB. 

FA-108S9-8000-R Basic Salary Plan. NEB. 

MN-10878-8000-R Ordained Deacon's proposal. NEB. 

FM-11379-3000-M The Basis of the Bible and the Godly Principles 
of The United Methodist Church. William David Neeae, Corsica, PA. 

LC-11S89-0227-D Nonparticipatcry Membership. Roy E. Nelson, 
KSW. 

LC-11442-024e-D Membership of Charge Conference. Roy E. 
Nelson, KSW. 

LC-11448-0248-D The Administrative Conference, iioy £. iVelton, 
KSW. 

FM-12894-8000-R Retain Present Stand Regarding 
Homosexuality. Outreach Ministry + 70 church groups + 82 Individ., 
New Bethel UMC, Crestview, Fh. 

C8-12088-SOOO-R Support Action Opposing Pornography. Pastor 
+ 63 Members, New Bloomington Charge UMC, New Bloomington, OB. 

FA-120S94000-R General Council on Finance and 
Administration: Proposed Budget. Pastor + 63 Members, New 
Bloomington Charge UMC, New Bloomington, OH. 

D1-1116S-S00O-R Establish Preferred Language to Des<ribe God. 
Administrative Board, New Castle UMC, New Castle, KY. 

FA-12297-3000-R Urge That All Proposals to Relocate the 
General Board of Global Ministries be Defeated. Committee of 100 + 7 
Other Individuals. New Hartford, NY. 

IC-11621-0741-D Eliminate COSROW. CS Newberry and Evelyn 
Dehong, Circleville, OH, Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX. 

DI-11608-1807-D Membership of the NYMO Steering Committee. 
CS Newberry, Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX. 

FA-12817-0911-D Removal of the General Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women. CS Newberry, Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX. 

GJ-11611-080S-D Eliminate the General Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women. CS Newberry, Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX 

IC-11622-0741-D The Responsibility of COSROW in the Annual 
Conference. CS Newberry, Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX. 

IC-11626-2201-D Eliminate General Commission on Status and 
Role of Women. CS Newberry and Evelyn Dehong, CircUvUle, OB, 
Marvin UMC, Tyler, TX 

CS-12416-0071-D Abortion. 22 individual members, Newport 
UMC, Newport, KY. 

FM-10615-8000-R Retain the Term, Practice and Service of 
Confirmation as Is. NGA, FhA. 

CS-1086e4000-R Responsible Parenthood. NGA. 

GJ-10971-8000-R "MAY" as Christian Family Month. NGA. 

GJ-10121-0806-D General Program Boards Membership. NBA, 
WPA. 

CO-101 18-0023-0 Jurisdictional Committees on Episcopacy. 
NBA. 

CS-12802-8000-M$ Task Force on Abortion Prevalence. PUlip M. 
Nihlack, MOW. 

C8-I2808-S000-M$ Task Force to Study the Church's Teaching on 
Abortion. Philip M. Nihlack, MOW. 

DI-I2889-8000-R Baptism and Church Membership. Philip M. 
Nihlack, MOW. 

FM-1286S-8000-R No Quadrennial Study of Homosexuality for 
1992-96. PhUip M. Nihlack, MOE. 

CS-11262-8000-R Promote Campaign of Disapproval al Careless 
and Open Displays of Violence. Robert and hou Nicks, Beaufort, NC. 

CO-llfl71-8000-R On-Site Child Care at the 1996 General 
Conference. Gen./Jurisdictional Delegation ofNIh Conference, 
Sycamore, 71* 

CO-11800-070fl-D Privileges Granted to Full-Time, Part-Time and 
Student Local Pasters. Members of Standing Rules Committee, NIh. 

FA-10057-0900-D Oppose Funding "Gay" Caucus or Groups. NIL, 
Clh 

FA-10909-8000-R Annual AccessibiUty Audit. NIL, LVL, NIN. 

CO-10061-0745-D Annual Confa-ence Committees Regarding 
Persons with Handicapping Conditions. NIL Af^W. 

FA-10107-0709-D Funding to Local Churches for Accessible 
Buildings and Programs. NIL MNN. 

LC-100e6-0202-D Function of the Local Church. NIL MNN. 

MN-10166-0489-D Ministering to Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. NIL NIN, MNN. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



69 



Transfer of Certification by Lay Readers. NIN. 
Personal and Tax-Deferred Accumulations. 



Function of the Local Church. NIN. 
Wcrkofthe Board of Ordained Ministry. NIN. 
Reeponsibilitiee of the Division of Ordained 

Lay Observers Elected the Board of Ordained 



FM-1010S-0072-D Rigfatsof Lesbians and Gay Men. A/St Arr£ 

IC-10e21-SO00-R Opposing the Incorrect Use of the Word 
"Ethnic". NIL. 

IC-1097S4000-R Holy Land Tours. NIL. 

LC-10077-026S-D Cocrdinator of Communications. NIL. 

C8-11816-8000-R National Health Care Plan, feojtfc Core Tos* 
Force, NIN and COM. 

CO-109eS-<000-R Editorial Changes in the Discipline. NIN. NIL 

FM-1061»«000-R United Methodist Baptism Study. NIN. SIL 

CO-10689-0701-D Composition and Character of the Annual 
Conference. NIN. 

CO-10987-0701-D The Purpose of the Annual Conference. NIN. 

CS-10286-S000-R Support and Concern to Moiambique. NIN. 

C8-1060e-8000-R Bring Peaceful Solution to Sierra Leone and 
Liberia. NIN. 

DI-1029&4278-D 

FA-108«a-80OO-R 
NIN. 

GJ-1OS48-S00O-R4 Constitutional Convention for Church 
Structure. NIN. 

HE-10214-1518-D Purposes and Objectives of University Senate. 
NIN. 

LC-1021ft«202-D 

MN-102S4-07S8-D 

MN-10270-1627-D 
Ministry. NIN. 

CO.1011&«704-D 
Ministry. NIS. 

nT-110e2-SOOO-R Support the Adoption of the National Plan en 
Hispanic Ministries. Hiapanic Work Coordinating Committee, NJY. 

BlN-l 0246-0424-0 Requirenwnts for Admission in an Annual 
Conference. NJY. 

CS>10906^000-R Ban on Alcohol Beverage Advertisements. 

mix. 

PA-10SSO-0911-D The Appointments Subject to Reduction. NUX. 

OJ-10&47-S00O-M$ Restructuring Task Force for General Church. 
NUX. 

C8-11814-S0OO-R The United Nations Women's Convention. 
Committee on the Statua and RoU of Women. NNY. 

MN-11886-04SS-D Grievance Procedures. CommitUeontKeStatut 
and Role of Women, NNY. 

HN-1 1816-0489-D Reeponsibilitiee and Duties of a Pastor. 
Conference Council on Finance and Administration, NNY. 

FA-lOSOe-SOOO-R ReafBrm New York City as the Location fcr the 
Office of the General Board of Global Ministries. NNY, TRY, NYK. 

C8-1028S400O-R UMC Position on Gambling. NNY. 
National Health Care Plan. NNY. 
Clergy Support. NNY. 
Conference Basic Salary Plan. NNY. 
Support Domestic Partneirehip Legislation. 
Clarence R. Norment, Lebanon UMC, Hanover, VA. 

CS-121S2-S00O-R Aids Ministry Task Force in Each Local Church. 
North American International Caucus, Fayetteville, NC. 

CO-120ee-0746-D Annual Conference Committee on Accessibility. 
North Central Jurisdiction Accesaibilily Advocates. 

CO-12097-8000-R Editorial Change. North Central Jurisdiction 
Accessibility Advocates. 

FA-12099-0709-D Responsibilities of Annual Conference Council 
on Ministries. North Central Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

GJ-12102-027S-D Special Sundays . Access Sunday. North 
Central Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

LC-12111-0202-D Function of the Local Church. North Central 
Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

LC-1211S-02a2-D Coordinator of Communications. North Central 
Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

L£-12114-2648-D New Buildings and Parsonages. North Central 
Jurisdiction Acceasibilify Advocates. 

MN-1211ft4)424-D Educational Requirements fcr Ordination. 
North Central Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

MN-1212a-048»-D ResponsibiUtiee and Duties of a Pastor. North 
Central Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 

LC-1215S4>282-D Annual Accessibility Audit. North Central 
Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates. 



C8-10606-SOOO-R 
FA-10111-0721-D 
FA-108S84000-R 
CS-122094000-R 



CS-12S1S-S00O-R Accessibility of Meeting Places Beyond the 
Local Church. North Centred Jurisdiction Accessibility Advocates and 
Philip Niblack, St Louis, UO. 

CO-11467-062S-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
Committee on Episcopacy, North (Central Jurisdiction. 

IC-12806-8000-R Elimination of the Commission on Status and 
Role of Women. Administrative Council, North Lewisburg UMC, North 
Lewisburg, OH. 

MN-1 1S20-061 7-D Selection and Assignment of District 
Superintendents. Jurisdiction Urban Steering Committee, 
Northeastern Jurisdiction. 

CC-1 10fi7-S00O-R Creation of a Shaba-Tanzania Annual 
Conference. NSH. 

IC-12S08-SOOO-M$ Independent Commission on Alcohol and Othsr 
Drugs. NTX + 40 local church groups+ 917 individuals, Evanston, IL. 

CO-11649-0726-D Age Level and Family Ministries. ATTX and 
Wesley Youngblood Coord. Older Adults. 

FA-11SSS-8000-R Maintain the 1992 General Fund 
Apportionments as Maximum to be Apportioned. NTX Conference and 
Don Strickland, Somerville, TX. 

IC-llSll-SOOO-R Delay Action on the Churches in Covenant 
Communion a Proposal until 1996. Conference CCUIC, NTX 

GJ-12221-1006-D Pricritization of Funding Requests. Delation, 
NTX. 

C8-11562-0071-D Single Persons. NTX. 

CB-11S684I000-R Concern for El Salvador. NTX 

IC-11677-S0OO-R Continue General Commission on Religicn and 
Race. NTX. 

CS-10607-SOOO-M Boards and Agenciee Regarding Abcrtion. 
NWT. 

FA-10008-0710-D World Service and Conference Benevolence 
Budget. Amend para. 710.3D. NWT. 

GJ-10a87-8000-Rt Establish General Board of EvangeUsm. NWT. 

LC-10010-0247-D World Service and Conference Benevolence. 
Amend para. 247. NWT. 

MN-10626-S000-R Revising Proposed Description of Deacon's 
Ministry. NWT. 

MN-llS4e-8000-R Commission to Study The Ministry Refiort. 
Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, NYK. 

FM-12847-S000-R Human and Civil RigfaU of Lesbians and Gay 
Men. Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK. 

FM-12S51-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 71F. Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, NYK 

MN-12M1-0402-D Removal of Ban on Homosexuals as Ordained 
Ministers. Methodist Federation for Social Action, NYK 

C8-1 1041-8000-R Prejudice Against Muslims and Arabs in the 
U.SJV. NYK 

FA-11042-0906-D 

FA-11O48-A0OO-R 
Churches. NYK. 

GJ-11044-S000-R 
Cities. NYK 

GJ-11O4S-S00O-R Compliance with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act for employers. NYK 

LC-11046-2648-D Discontinuation or Abandonment of Local 
Church Property. NYK 

MN-12S804>402-D Ordination and Appointment of Homosexual 
Persons. Adm. Bd + 59 other local groups and 162 individual, Obetz 
UMC. Obetz, OH. 

Annual Conference. Stephen Ohnsman, NJY. 
Clergy Support. Stephen Ohnsman, NJY. 
Episcopacy Assistance. Stephen Ohnsman, 



Fiscal Responsibility and Homosexuality. NYK 
Continuation of Accessibility Grants to Local 

Quadrennial Exnphasis on Reclaiming the 



Episcopal Supervision. Stephen Ohnsman, 



CO-1166»4)0104: 

FA-H67W)717-D 

MN-11689406»C 
NJY. 

MN-lie9Ofl067-C 
NJY. 

MN-11S92-0441-D Support for Ordained Ministers Appointed to a 
Pastoral Charge. Stephen Ohnsman. NJY. 

MN-1KUI-O408-D FuIlUme Local Pastors. OK. Fellowship of 
Assoc. Members and Local Pastors, Oklahoma City. OK 

MN-116S2-0419-D Rightsof Associate Members of Annual 
Conference. OK. Fellowship of Assoc. Members and Local Pastors, 
Oklahoma City, OK 

IC-1109ft-2201-D Supports the Continued Existence of the General 
Conunission on the Status and Role of Women. Commission on the 
Status and Role of Women, OKL. 



60 



May 5, 1992 



LC-11876-0247-D Lowa- the Age for Older Adulto to Over 66. 
Older Aduit Council of South Georgia, Macon, GA. 

LC-11877-024&-D Change the Age for Older Adulte. Older Adult 
Council of South Georgioy Macon, GA. 

MN-12117-(V127-D Transfers from Other Annual Conferences. 
Kdth R. OUon, SIN. 

CS-llSe7-S0OO-R National Health Insurance Program. 
Administrative Council, Oneco UMC, Oncco, FL. 

MN-12017-0S07-D Consecration of the Diaconal Minister. Board 
ofDiaconal Ministry, ORl. 

CS-11298-800O.R End U.S. Military presence in Bolivia. Peace 
with Juatioe Div. 4 Bd. of Church & Society, ORI. 

C8-1128«-0072-D The Drug Dependent Person and Their Family. 
Task Force on Addiction andAnnis Rae Benson, ORI, Bend, OR. 

MN-1201»4000-R One Conference Board of Ministry. Board of 
Diaconal Ministry, ORI. 

CS-11298-S00(VR The En^sh Language Movement. Frank R. 
Ostertag, NJY. 

08-12800-0906-0 Funds for "Gay" Caucuses. ifem{>er^ Ottebein 
UMC, Robinson, IL. 

MN-1127e-04ie-D Required College Credit Hours to Become 
Elder. 21 members. Otter Creek UMC, Westville, FL 

LC-11172-0224-D Baptism and Confirmation of Children. 
Administration Board, Overton Park and Grace UMCs. 

CS-11164-0071-D Retain the Present Statement Regarding 
Abortion. Administration Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, TX. 

GJ-11086-OOie-C Restrictive Rules. Administrative Board, 
Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, TX. 

GJ-110914000-R Mandatory Quotas on Boards, agencies and 
committees. Administrative Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, 
TX. 

HE-1109e-S0OO-R Requirements for Seminary Teachers. 
Administrative Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, TX 

LC-1117S-022&D Baptism and Confirmation. Administration 
Board, Overton Park UMC, Fort Worth, TX. 

CS-11071-S00O-R Rights of United States Citizens. 
Administrative Board, Overton Park UMC, Forth Worth, TX 

CO-11190-0701-D Clergy Membership of the Annual Conference. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DBT. 

FA-1I201-0722-D Basic Salary Plan for Active and Itinerant 
Local Pastors. Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DBT. 

FA-1120S4000-M$ Committee on Church Owned Agriculture 
Land. Margaret A. Paige and James B. Paige Jr., DET. 

FA-1120&-8000-M$ Church-wide Study of Cla-gy Salary/Suppcrt 
Structure. Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

GJ-11210-0276-D Rural Life Sunday, Fifth Sunday after Easter. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

LC-11226-0206-D Cooperative Pariah Ministries, if a/XO'«'-A- 
Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

LC-11226-0244-D Organization of the Local Church. Margaret A 
Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

LC-11788-0246-D Local Church Organization and Administration. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., UM Town and Rural 
Fellowship - Detroit Conf. Chap. 

MN-11232-0406-D Authority and Duties of Local Pastors. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr.. DET. 

MN-112«S-0408-D Local Pastors as Delegates and Serve on 
Boards. Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-11284-0412-D Clergy Membership of the Annual Conference. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-1I2S6.0419-D Rights of Associate Members of Annual 
Conference. Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-1128a-04«7-D The Itinerant System Margaret A. Paige and 
James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-112J7-0514-D Specific Responsibilities of Bishops. Margaret 
A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-11288-0627-D Election of General Secretaries by the Council 
of Bishops. Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

MN-1128»4)7««-D Membership and Duties of the Board of 
Ordained Ministry. Margaret A. Paige and James B. Paige Jr., DBT. 

MN-1 1240-0762-D District Committee on Ordained Ministry. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 

CO-11191-0706-D Local Pastors RighU in Annual Conf»ence8. 
Margaret A. Paige and James E. Paige Jr., DET. 



DI-lie78-S0OO-R Emphasizing Theological and Moral Teaching of 
the United Methodist Church. Alfred I Palmer, Beckley, WV. 

HE-lie20-161&-D Institutional Affiliation. AdnunUtnUuK £oani, 
Panther Springs UMC, Morristown, TN. 

MN-11106-040e-D Authority and Duties of a Local Pastor. 39 
members, Papervilie and Sinking Springs UMCs, Bristol, TN. 

FM-1281S-8000-R Reject the Homosexuality Study 
Reconunendations. Administrative Board and the Joy Class, Parkview 
UMC, Miamisburg, OH. 

CS-11602-S000-R Fund Full-Ume with Justice Staff Members of 
the Peace with Justice Com-mittee, Holston Conference, Gatlinburg, TN. 

GJ-llie4-S0O0-R Peace with Justice Special Sunday Offering. 
Peace with Justice Project, Lakeside Peace and Justice Coalition, 
Cleveland Heights, OH. 

GJ-11766-S0OO-R NonFinancial Constitution Needs of General 
Boards and Agencies. Charles W. and Wilma T. Pearce, Silver Palm 
UMC, Homestead, FL. 

GJ-119444000-R Meetings of General Boards and Agencies. 
Charles W. and Wilma T. Pearce, Silver Palm UMC, Homestead, FU 

GM-117e8-1412-D Limit Meetings of the General Board of Global 
MinistrieB. Charles W. and Wilma T. Pearce, Silver Palm UMC, 
Homestead, FL. 

IC-1177S-2202-D General Commission on the Status and Role of 
Women. Charles W. and Wilma T. Pearce, Silver Palm UMC, 
Homestead, FL. 

MN-10027-0468-D9 Joint Review Committee for Pastors. Amend 
para- 463. IC. Administrative Council, Pella UMC, Pella, LA.. 

CS-10602-S00O-R ReackingOut to the Homeless. PEN. 

DI-11864-S000-R Enlist and Involve the Youth in the Life of the 
Church. Thomas R Pendell and Herman Will, CAP. 

MN-1014&-O402-D Acceptance of Persons Practicing 
Homosexuality. Administrative Board, Pender UMC, Fairfax, VA. 

DM2266-1224-D Curriculum Resource Materials. Admin. Board 
-t- 21 other groups + 4S individuals. Perry Hall UMC, Baltimore, MD. 

CO-12096-0607-D Two Quadrennia, Maximum Years a Bishcfi 
Assigned to an Area. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

DI-12098-SOOO-R Support Adoption of Proposed Book of Worship. 
Paul F.Perry, TEX. 

FA-121004000-R Support Proposed Budget For 1993-96 With 
Annual Increase of 4.2%. Paul F Perry, TEX. 

FM-12101-00e8-D Our Theological Task. Paul F. Perry. TEX. 

FM-12S71-SO0O-R Adoption of the Majority Report of the 
Commission to Study Homosexuality. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

IC-121O7-SO0O-M Adopt the Document Churches in Covenant 
Communion. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

IC-121084000-M Supporting the Resolution on Christian-Muslim 
Relations. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

IC-12109-8000-R Svq>port Continued Membership in WCC, NCCC 
and COCU. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

LC-1211(W)201-D A Local ChurA. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

MN-12118-O480-D The Purpose of Ordination. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

HN-12120-0486-D Clergy Appointment Designation. PaulF. 
Perry, TEX. 

MN-12121-0489-D Reeponsibilitiee and Duties of a Pastor. Paul 
F. Perry, TEX 

MN-12126-0609-D Termination of Office. Paui F. Perry. T^X 

MN-12126-0627-D The Bishop as the Ecumenical Officer within 
the Judicatory and Districts. Paul F. Perry, TEX. 

MN-12127-068S-D The Process of Appointment Making. Pau<F. 
Perry, TEX. 

MN-1212S4000-R Revise the Study of the Ministry Report. Paul 
F. Perry, TEX 

GJ-11188-0276-D The Observance of Heritage Sunday. David E. 
Persons, TEX 

CO-12S76'00S6-C Composition of Annual Conference. Association 
of Deaconesses, PHI. 

CS-11127-1104-D Responsibilities oftbe General Board of Church 
and Society. Larry D. Pickens, NIL 

IC-11140-2008-D Responsibilities of the General Commission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. Larry D. Pickens, NIL. 

IC-11166-2108-D Responsibilities of The Commission on Religion 
and Race. Larry D. Pickens, NIL 

GJ-11767-8000-R EstabUsh a 'Thrug Awareness Sunday". Betty 
PickeU and 13 Individuals, Ulta Woods UMC, Jackson, MS. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



61 



FM-11819-8000-R Rebaptism for ThoM Baptized as InianU or 
Children. Memhera, Pilot Knob UMC, MUltown, IN. 

LC-1 1668-0221-0 Infant Baptism/Dedication. Member*, Pilot 
Knob UMC, Milllown, IN. 

MN-llU7-041ft-D Special Conditions. Charge Conference, Pine 
BiU UMC, Pine BiU, AL. 

CS-12002-SOOO-R Violence and Pornography on TV. 
Adminietrative Council, Pioneer UMC, Portland, OR. 

C8-ia41S-0071-D Abortion. 96 individual memher$, Plea*ant 
View UMC, Abingdon, VA. 

FA-12280-8000-R Relocate to Lees Expensive and Central City • 
No Further Study. 144 Individual Member; Pleaeant View UMC, 
Abingdon, VA. 

FA-10116-0S00-D Fiscal Responsibilities. PNW, EPA, TRY, CNV. 

CS-1016&4000-R Support Legislation Prohibiting Malicious 
HarassmenU. PNW. 

CS-10286-S000-R Affirm Support for Civil Rights. PNW. 

GJ-10126-0820-D UMC Program and Fiscal Year. PATW. 

IC-10277-800O.R In Support of COCU Proposal. PNW. 

LC-10184-0208-D Affirm the Churches Open to all Believers. 
PNW. 

MN-10026-8000-R One Ordination with Two Tracks. PNW. 

MN-10ia9-0462-D Retirement of Ministers on Honorable 
Location. PNW. 

CS-11259-S00O-R Circumcision Viewed as Cruel and TnKiiiwnn 
Ted Pong, Langley UMC, Langley, WA. 

FM-1 161O.S00O-R Reject Report of Committee to Study Baptism. 
Administrative Council, Port William UMC, Port William, OH. 

OM-12ieO4000-R Pastors of the Methodist Church of Puerto Rico 
Continuance in the Pension Plan. PRC. 

GM-12iei-S00O-R Relationship Between United Methodist 
Church and New AfGliated Autonomous Methodist Church of P.R. 
PRC. 

FM-12a88-S0O0-R Perverts Not to be Considered Clergy Members 
ofThe United Methodist Church. Paul N. Prentice, UMC at Church 
SL, Byde Park, NY. 

FM-11484-00OS-D Complete Re-ezamination of Our Belie& in 
Ood'e Holy Word. Gloria R Price, Union Memorial UMC, St Louie, 
MO. 

FM-1148&^00O-R Elements of Doctrine and Discipline Documents 
Referenced to the Holy Scripture. Gloria R Price, Union Memorial 
UMC, SL Louie, MO. 

FM-114S7-S0OO-R Addition to Our HariUge and Standards That 
We "Love One Another". Gloria R. Priee, Union Memorial UMC, St 
Louie, MO. 

C8-11426-0072-D Rights of Racial and Ethnic Persons. Gloria 
Reagon Price, Union Memorial UMC, St Louie, MO. 

FM-114S8-006a-D Reexamine Christian Affirmations of Faith of 
The United Methodist Church. Gloria R. Price, Union Memorial UMC, 
St Louie, MO. 

FM-12Sei-<000-R Report of the Committee Regarding 
Homosexuality. Adminietraiive Board, Prospect UMC, Protpect OH. 

CO-11505-0085-C Annual Conference. Administrative Board, 
Providence UMC, Birmingham-West AL. 

FA-lieift4000-R EsUblish Equalized Salaries of All Ministers. 
Administrative Board Providence UMC, Birmingham. 

IC-118e7-S000-R< "Catch the Spirit" Funding. Margaret J. 
Pullman, Saint James UMC, Newport NC. 

GJ-1 1846-2021-0 False Claims of Credentiala Roberts. 
Pullman, Saint James UMC, Newport NC. 

LC-1187(M)227-D Staff-Parish Relations Affiliate Member. Robert 
S. Pullman, Saint James UMC, Newport NC. 

MN-1148»«446-D Renewal Leave for Ministers. PhyUis and 
Robert Rabh, Stuart PL. 

FA-10618-S000-8 Report of Task Foroe to Study the Feasibility of 
Relocating to the GBGM. RBOM. 

FM-1019S-0071-D Human Sexuality. Retain the present warding 
of 71 F. RDM + 26 Other Annual Conferences. 

MN-10S694000-R Authority and Duty of Local Pastors. RDM 
andKSW. 

FA-10206-266S-D IVustees of Church Institutions. RDM. 

C8-1112S-S0OO-R Opposition to a Call for a Constitutional 
Convention. Derek B. Reinhard and William B. Detling, First UMC, 
Clovis, NM. 



CO-12260-0726-D The Conference Scouting Coordinator. Gilbert 
Rhoades, Jr. -H 12 Other Individuals, Bells UMC, Baltimore, MD. 

CO-122ei4>749-D The District Scouting Coordinator. Gilbert 
Rhoades, Jr. + 24 Other Individuals, Bells UMC, Clinton, MD. 

MN-lie84-046<-D Joint Review Committee. Sai/y A. iiice, 
Stonington, ME. 

LC-11444-02e8-D Prison Ministry. Peggy Richards, CIL. 

CC-linO-OCai-C changing "Ministerial" to "Clergy". C. Faith 
Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-1118(V0012-C Changing the Wording "Ministerial" to 
"Clergy". C. Faith Ridiardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-111814)014-C Update Language of the Constitution. C. Faith 
Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11182-002S-C Update the Language ctf the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-1118S-0026-C The Distinction Between "Ministers" and 
"Clergy". C. Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11184-00S6-C The Distinction. of "Minister" Between Clergy 
and Laity. C. Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11166-0086-C Changing the Wo-ding "Ministerial" to 
"Clergy". C. Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11186.0087<; Update the Language of the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11187-00S8-C Update the Language cf the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

OJ-11404-OOei.C Update the Language of the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

MN-1128(M)018-C Update the Language of the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

MN-11281-0068-C Update the Language of the Constitution. C. 
Faith Richardson, Newton UMC, Newton, MA. 

CO-11987-0701-D Composition and Character of Clergy 
Membership. Administrative Board, Rimersburg and Lawsonham 
UMCs. 

MN-11962-0408-D Categories of Local Pastors. Administrative 
Boards, Rimersburg and Lawsonham. UMCs. 

MN-11968-0412-D General Provision Admission and Continuance. 
Administrative Boards, Rimersburg and Lawsonham UMCs. 

CO-10042-0086-C The Annual Confermce, Basic Body in the 
Church. RIO. 

MN-1 00884)788-0 Membership of Conference Board of Ordained 
Ministry. RIO. 

MN-1008»«762-D District Committee on Ordained Ministry. RIO. 

FH-12891-0071-D Human Sexuality. Retain para. 7 IF. BS2 
individuals and 301 local groups, RKM. 

IC-1188»4000-R Eradication of Racism. RKM and Black 
Methodist for Church Renewal 

CO-11847 0704-D The Laity Address to Annual Conference. RKM 
and the Nat Assoc, of Conference Lay Leaders. 

CO-11861-8000-R Executive Session. RKM Confermce and the 
National Association of, Conference Lay Leaders. 

MN-11414-0486-D Laying on of Hands. National Association of 
Conference Lay Leaders, RKM. 

HE-1177O-800O-R4 Campus Ministry Special Program 1993-96. 
RKM, NTX and TEX. 

CO-1186(V8000-R Inclusive Delegation from Annual Conferences. 
RKM. 

C8-11868-8000-R Comprehensive Health Insurance Plan. RKM. 

CS-11868-S000-R Nuclear Safety in the United SUtee. RKM. 

CS-1186O400O-R Support for Recommendations of the Oenetie 
Task Force. RKM. 

FA-12886-0eO6-D Fiscal Responsibilities of General Commission 
of Finance and Administration Regarding HIV Epidemic. RKM. 

OJ-1 1881 -081 S-D PoUcies Relative to Non-dis<rimination. RKM. 

OJ-11884-800O-R Support to Strengthen Ethnic Minority Local 
Church. RKM. 

OJ-11886-8000-R Columbus Quintcentenary. RKM. 

GJ-llSSe-SOOO-R Earth Day Observance. RKM. 

LC-11892-02fil-D Local Church Lay Leader. RKM. 

LC-11896-026&-D Committee on Nominations and Personnel. 
RKM. 

CO-100S1-0704-D Annual Conference Executive Session. Amend 
para. 704.6. J. David Roberts, BLT. 

CS-12804-S000-R Abortion ■ Amend 7 Ig. Gertrude Rohrbach and 
Dan Johnson, Indian River City UMC, Titusville, FL 



62 



May 5, 1992 



Ag« Level and Family Councils. SCA. 

Golden Croee Sunday. SCA. 

Consultative Relationship with UM ScbooU of 

Clergy Requirements for Admission into Pull 

Responsibilities of the Division of Ordained 



CO-1180»^000-R Recycled or Reclaimed Paper. ErieV.Sothe, 
White Rock UMC, Dallas, TX. 

MN-12890-0402-D E^>€rimental and Prnvisional. Philip Ruduill, 
SL Mark UMC, Atlanta, GA. 

C8-121994)072-D The Social Community Population. Population 
Subcommittee of Church and Society, Sage UMC, Monterey, CA. 

C8-12202-8000-M$ Task Force on World Population. Population 
Subcommittee of Church and Society, Sage UMC, Monterey, CA. 

FM-11S4(VSOOO-R Baptized InianU as Full Members. 
Administrative Board, Saint Andrew UMC, Penaacola, FL. 

GJ-111S9-S000-M$ Committee to Study General Council on 
Ministries and Other Comznitteee, Boards and Agencies. 
Administrative Board, Saint Andrew UMC, Penaacola, FL. 

FA-11680-0725-D Shared Salary Options. Salary Equalization 
Task Force, Highland Park, IL. 

CS-11S64-<000-R Adopt the Men^his Declaration as Policy. 
Sardis UMC + 3 other local church groups and, 3 individuals. 

DI-11669-1212-D Board of Evangelism. Administrative Board, 
Sardis UMC, Sardis, MS. 

DI-1166(KS000-M Retain Biblical Language in the Bock of 
Worship. Administrative Board, Sardis UMC, Sardis, MS. 

IC-13177-1906-D Organization and Membership of the 
Commission on Communication. Council on Ministries, Sardis UMC, 
Sardis, MS. 

GM-11441-S000-R AboUsh the "Grant System" of the General 
Board of Global Ministriee. W. Ernest Saunders, First UMC, Key West, 
FL. 

MN-12244-0462-D Honorable Location. Board of Ordained 
Ministry, SCA. 

CO-10190-0726-D 

GJ-10208-0276-D 

HE-10216-1621-D 
Theology. SCA. 

MN-10247-0424-D 
Connection. SCA. 

MN-10272-1629-D 
Ministry. SCA. 

CS-12402-0071-D Abortion. William Schafer Jr. + 5 other 
individuals, Indian River City UMC, Titusville, FL 

FA-12271-0921-D The Ministerial Education Fund. Stan 
SchUffarth, KEN. 

FM-118SS4000-R Response to The Study Document "By Water 
and the Spirit". Stan SchUffarth, KEN. 

GJ-11849-SO0O-R Moratoriiun on Study Committees Through the 
1993-96 Quadrennium. Stan SchUffarth, KEN. 

HE-12279-1617-D Membership cf the University Senate. Stan 
SchUffarth, KEN. 

MN-1228&-07S8-D Duties of the Board of Ordained Ministry. Stan 
SchUffarth, KEN. 

MN-10161-O414-D Questions for the Order of Deacon. Rev. 
Margaret Roohan Schmitz, WVA. 

MN-1016S-0424-D Question fcr the Order of Elder. Rev. Margaret 
Roohan Schmitz, WVA. 

CO-121S0-S000-R Committee to Propose Revisions in the Book of 
Discipline. Dale A. Schoening, TWA. 

CO-121844)e08-D Petitions to General Conference. Daie A. 
Schoening, TWA. 

HE-11096-S000-M$ Study Guidelines on the Use of D.D. Degrees 
fcr Clergy. Albert J. Schroder, VA. 

FM-12869-0071-D Human Sexuality. C. Bubois Schutt, NCA. 

LC-11879-0268-D Family Members. C. Dubois Schutt, NCA. 

CO-10181-4>e2S-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. SDA. 

DI-10eO9-SOOO-R Age Level and Family Ministries. SDA. 

GJ-11486-S000-M9 Committee to Study Expanding United 
Methodist Mission in Alaska. Carol Ann Seckel, AKM. 

CO-11647-0602-D Composition of General Conference. SBJ 
Association of Conference L,ay Leaders, Arlington, VA. 

MN-11692-0628-D Preearvation of District Records. SEJ 
Commission on Archives and History, Southeastern Jurisdiction. 

LC-11S81-0247-D Mandatary Church Histcrian. SEJ Commission 
on Archives and History, Jackson, TN. 

LC-116S2-4260-D Mandatory Church Historian. SSi/ Commwsion 
on Archives and History, Jackson, TN. 

GJ-116124)80(>-D Nominations by Conferences to Jurisdictional 
Pool. David L. Severe, OKL. 



CS-11996-SO0O-R Employment Provisions for Disabled Persons 
Who are Ordained Ministers. David T. Seymour, PEN. 

MN-11997-M61-D En^lqyment Provisions for Disabled Ordained 
Ministers. David T. Seymour, PEN. 

MN-11998-0458-D Employed of Disabled Ordained Ministers. 
David T. Seymour, PEN. 

MN-1199&O60S-D Involuntary Retirement. David T. Seymour, 
PEN. 

CS-10608-8000-R Discontinue all Forms of Si^port to RCAR. 
SGA, TEN, KEN. WVA, AFL, WPA. 

CO-lOlOO-OeiO-D Speaking fcr the Church. SGA. 

C8-10284-8000-R Abortions as an Acceptable Means cf Birth 
Control. SGA. 

CB-10288-gOOO-R Constitutional Convention. SGA. 

C8-1029<W000-R Medical Righte for Children and Youth. SGA. 

C8-10291-S0OO-R Incorporate the Durham Declaration into 
Abortion Statement. SGA. 

CS-10292-8000-R The Populaticn and Family Planning. SGA. 

LC-11897-0269-D Duties of the Pastoral Advisory Ccmmittee. 
John J. Shaffer, AKM. 

FA-11827-0911-D Support of Missionaries. Administratiue 
Council, Sharonville UMC, Cineinatti, OH. 

GM-11862-1404-D Budget of General Board of Global Ministries. 
Administrative CouncU, SharonvUle UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

FM-128S9^000-R Affirm Our Ministry for and with Lesbians and 
Gay Men. Wally Shearbon, Toledo, OH. 

CS-11988-0070-D The Natural World and Animal Life. Joseph M. 
Shreve, Kee Street UMC. 

C8-11990-0071-D Death With Dignity. Joseph M. Shreve, Kee 
Street UMC. 

CS-11991-0072-D The Social Conomunity and Tobacco. Joseph M. 
Shreve, Kee Street UMC. 

C8-11992-0078-D The Economic Community Collective 
Bargaining and Consumption. Joseph M. Shreve, Kee Street UMC. 

C8-11998-0074-D The Political Community Criminal Justice and 
Military Sa-vice. Joseph if. Shreve, Kee Street UMC. 

C8-11994-0075-D War and Peace. Joseph M. Shreve, Kee Street 
UMC. 

CS-1199S-007e-D Our Social Creed. Joseph M. Shreve, Kee Street 
UMC. 

C8-12407-0071-D Abortion. Joseph M. Shreve, Kee Street UMC. 

FM-12868-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. Joseph M. 
Shreve. 

IC-1116e-8000-R Membership in the National Coundl of 
Churches of Christ. Philip K Shriver, Sweet Home UMC, Sweet Home, 
OR. 

CS-11128-8000-R Amendment to the Social Creed. Charles B. 
Shuman, First UMC, SuUivan, TL 

C8-10196-0071-D Abortion. STL, RDM and CTX. 

FA-10S87-8000-R Limit Budget Increase for Next Quadrennium. 
SiL. 

GH-1027S-1411-D Board of Trustees on Directors of Mission 
Agencies. STL. 

CO-11241-060e-D Episcopal Search Committee in Eadi 
Jurisdiction. Robert D. Simison, KSW. 

FM-12862-0071-D Human Sexuality. Robert D. Simison, KSW. 

C8-12204-8000-M Re^jonse when Expressing Personal Injury. 
Edward W. Simons, West Burlington UMC, Wellsboro, PA. 

LC-11494-026S-D Committee on Pastor-Parish Relations. Betty 
Simpson, North Street UMC, Port Huron, MT. 

CO-11198-0726-D Conference Council on Ministries. 21st 
Century Task Force, STN. 

CS-11194-0728-D Conference Board of Church and Society . 21st 
Century Task Force, SIN. 

DI-11199-0729-D Conference Board of Discipleship. 21st Century 
Task Force, STN. 

FA-1 1202-0722-D Commission on Equitable Salary. 21st Century 
Task Force, SIN. 

FA-11208-0787-D Conference Board of Pensions. 22»t Centory 
Task Faroe, SIN. 

HE-11218-0782-D Conference Board of Higher Education and 
Can^jus Ministry. 21st Century Task Force, SIN. 

IC-11221-07S8-D Conference Commission on Archives and 
History. 21st Century Task Force, SIN. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



63 



IC-11222.078&-D Conference Commiseion on Christian Unity and 
Interreligious Concerns. 21aL Century Tatk Force, SIN. 

IC-11228-0740-D Conference Commission on Religion and Race. 
21»t Century Ttuk Force, SIN. 

IC-11224-0741-D Conference Commission on the Status and Role 
of Women. 2ijt Century Task Force, SIN. 

CS-10864-0072-D Alcohol and Other Drugs. SIN. 

MN-1062S-0402-D Human Sexuality. SIN. 

C8-110e6-8000-R Oppose Support For and Membership in the 
Religious Coalition fcr Abortion Rights. AdminutrtUive Board, 
Singer't Oap UMC, Mount Union, PA. 

C8-1106S-8000-R Oppose Church's Support of Abortion 
Organizations. Administratiite Council, Skylajid UMC, Atlanta, GA. 

CC-1196e-0e6S-D Concordat Agreements. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OB. 

CO-11782-0608-D Petitions to General Conference. Leonard D. 
SluU, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati OH. 

CO-11967-0044-C Transfer of Local Churches. Leonard D. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

CO-11968-0e02-D Reduce Size of Gena-al Conference. Leonardo. 
Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

CO-11969^>704-D Business of the Conferenoe. Leonard D. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

CS-1 1798-1 106-D Organization of General Board Church and 
Society. Leonard D. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
OH. 

DI-11799-1204-D Commission on Central Conference Affairs. 
Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

DI-11800-1801-D United Methodist National Youth Ministry 
Organization. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, OH. 

FA-11824-0906-D Membership of the General Council on Finance 
and Administration. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Comm.un.ity UMC, 
Cincinnati, OH. 

FA-119eO-0787-D Two Retired Ministers in Membership of 
Annual Conference Board of Pensions. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

FA-119ei-<»906-D General Council on Finance and 
Administration's Committee structure. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Com.m.unity UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

FM-119e2-00a8-D Our Doctrinal Standards. Leonard D. Slutz, 
HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GJ-11844-1007-D Additional Representation on General Council 
on Ministriee. Leonard D. Sluts, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, OH. 

OJ-1196S-0805-D Representation of Central Conferences on 
General Program Boards. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Com.munity 
UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GJ-118S4-0808-D Board Meetings of General Agencies and 
Executive Committees. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community 
UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GJ-1 1866-0810-0 Maximum Period of Membership on a General 
Agency to Three Consecutive Terms. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

OJ-119e6-100e-D Study Composition and Number of Members of 
Governing Boards of Program and Other Agencies. Leonard D. Slut:, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GJ-119e7-100e-D Study of the Jurisdictional System by the 
General Council on Ministries. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

aj-11968-2606-D Members of the Judicial Council. Leonard D. 
Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

OJ-1196&-2614-D Power to Review Decisions of a Conunittee on 
Appeals of a Central Conference. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GJ-11970.2e21-D Chargeable Offenses. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

OJ-11971-2624-D General Trial Procedures. Leonard D. Slut;, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

OJ-11972-2626-D General Appeal Procedures. Leonard D. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community UMC; Cincinnati, OH. 

GM-1186S-1412-D Nomination and Election of Central Conference 
RepreeenUtives on the GBGM. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Comm-unity UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 



GM-11978-1424-D Composition of the Executive Committee of the 
Women's Division and Other Divisions. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

GM-11974-1428-0 Number and Method of Election of Women 
Members of the General Board of Global Ministries. Leonard D. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

HE-1197S-1S0K-D Refer Studies of Ministries or Diaconate to 
General Board of Higher Education. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

HE-11976-1607-D Central Con&rence Members of the Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry. Leonard D. Slut:, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

IC-11977-1804-D Members of Central Conference on General 
Commission on Archives and History. Leonard D. Slutz, HydePark 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

IC-11978-1907-D Members of Central Conference on the Gena-al 
Commission on Communication. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

IC-11979-200S-D Responsibilities of the General Conunission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Comm-unity UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

IC-11980-2006-D Representation trom Central Conferences on 
GCCUIC. Leonardo. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
OH. 

IC-11981-2108-D Representation of Central Conferences on 
General Commission on Rehgion and Race. Leonard O. Slutz, Hyde 
Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

IC-11982-2204-D Representation from the Central Conferences on 
Gen. Commission on the Status and Role of Women. Leonard O. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

LC-1198S-0271-D Transfer of a Local Church. Leonard O. Slutz, 
Hyde Park Community Church, Cincinnati, OH. 

MN-11984-0809-D Relations of Diaconal Ministers to Annual 
Conferences. Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, OH. 

MN-11986-0468-D Affirm Clearly the Ri^t to Trial. Leonardo. 
Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

MN-11986-0610-D Rightsof a Retired Bishop. Leonard O. Slutz, 
HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

MN-1 1987-0788-D To Add Lay Members to the Board of Ordained 
Ministry. Leonardo. Slutz, HydePark Community UMC, Cincinnati, 
OH. 

MN-1 19884>762-D Add Two Lay Members to District Committee 
on Ordained Ministry. Leonard O. Slutz, Hyde Park Community UMC, 
Cincinnati, OH. 

00-11126-0701-0 Equality of Voting RighU of Clergy. Robert B. 
Smeltzer, Scott Memorial UMC, Cadiz, OH. 

LC-10082-0221-D In&nt Baptism/Dedication. Amend para. 221. 
Or. Robert B. Smeltzer, WOH. 

LC-100S8-O222-O Infant Baptismal Certificate. Amend para. 222. 
Or. Robert B. Smeltzer, WOH. 

LC-10084-0228-D Infant Baptismal Register. Amend 223. Dr. 
Robert B. Smeltzer, WOH. 

LC-10085-0224-O Baptized Children as Preparatory Members. 
Amend para 224. Or. Robert B. SmelUtr, WOH. 

LC-100864)226-O Confirmation Classes: Duty of the Pastor. Dr. 
Robert B. Smeltzer, WOH. 

FA-11808-8000-R Special Arrangements fcr Participation in the 
Comprehensive Protection Plan. Donald A. Smith, First UMC, Marion, 
IN. 

FA-1 1804-8000-R Interpretation of Retirement Benefits fi-om the 
Death Benefit Program. Donald A. Smith, First UMC, Marion, IN. 

OJ-11228-8000-R Copyright Rules and the United Methodist 
Church. Richard H. Smith, Antioch UMC, Colonial Beach, VA. 

CS-10040-SOOO-R National Health Care Plan. SNE. 

GJ-10209-0824-O Church Funding Dates. SNE. 

GJ-10619-S00O-R Anna Howard Shaw Day. SNE. 

LC-10219-0208-D Membership in the UMC and in Racial and 
Ethnic Supremist Groups. SNE. 

MN-102S8-0688-O Process of Appointment Making. SNE. 

CS-100fi8-0071-O Regarding Abortion. SNJ, Clapp Chapel, Ml 
Oak UMC Mitchelluilk, MO. 

FM-10062-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 71-F. SNJ. 

FM-10618-8000-R Oppose the Elimination of the Rite of 
Confirmation. SNJ. 



64 



May 5, 1992 



HE-10976-S00O-R College of Medicine within the Africa 

University. SNJ. 

LC-1018S-O20O-D Membership Requirement. SNJ. 

MN-1008(M)402-D Ordination and Appointment of Homoeezual 
Persons. SNJ. 

MN-10S77-S0OO-R Homosexuality and the Ministry. SNJ. 

FA-112ei-0711-D Methods or Formulas for the Approved 
Connectional Ministries budget amounts. Bishop Dan E. Solomon, 
OKL. 

FA-112e7-S0OO-R Committee to Study Ways of Providing Housing 
for the Retired pastors. Juan S. Soto, RIO. 

IC-11278-2008-D Acceptance of the Document "Consultation on 
Church Union". Comnu on Christian Unity & Interreligious Concerns, 
South Pasadena UMC & MO W Conf. 

MN-100284>688-D The Appointment Process. Amend 633.6. 
Pastor Parish Relations Committee, South UMC, Manchester, CT. 

FM-12868-8000-R Deny Church Membership to Self-Avowed 
Practicing Homoeexuals. Mem,hers, South Union UMC, Flat Rock, IL. 

CO-10001-0048-C Boundaries of Annual Conference and Episcopal 
Area. Amend para. 43. Southeastern Jurisdictional Conference. 

CS-11600-SOOO-R Requirements Prior to Marriage. Robert J. 
Sowder, Evangelical Fellowship of Virginia Conference UM. 

C8-lia01-8000-R Requirements for Marriage. Robert J. Sowder, 
Evangelical Fellowship of Virginia Conference UM. 

FA-12288-8000-R Relocation of GBGM Central Area Such as 
Georgia, Tennessee and Kentucky. Alex R. Sparr + 5 Other 
Individuals, Pace, FL. 

FM-12841-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. J.Michael 
Spencer + Adm. Bd + individuals, Wallingford UMC, Seattle, WA. 

FM-12846-0071-D Human Sexuality. Amend 7 IF. Michael 
Spencer and Sunday Morning Discussion Grp., North Bethesda UMC, 
Seattle, WA. 

CS-il267-8000-R Work Area Chairperson for Conservation. 
Susan Spencer-Smith, Dayton, OH. 

GJ-11269-0004-C Inclusivenees of the Church. Susan 
Spencer-Smith, Dayton, OH. 

LC-12281-0269-D The Committee of Finance. William P. SpoHs, 
Little Rock, AS. 

G J-10791-8000-S Report of Task Force to Strengthen the Small 
Membership Church. SSMC. 

C8-11246-0070-D The Natural World and Animal Life. Church 
and Society Commission, St. Andrew 's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

C8-11247-0072-D The Social Community. Commission of Church 
and Society, St Andrew 's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

C8-11248-0078-D The Economic Community and Employment. 
Commission on Church and Society, St. Andrew 's UMC, San Antonio, 
TX. 

CS-11264-0074-D National Policies of Enforced Military Service. 
Church and Society, St Andrew's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

CS-11266-0074-D Oppose Capital Punishment. Church and 
Society, St Andrew 's UMC, San Antonio, TX 

CS-1126e-0075-D Concern for War and Peace. Church and 
Society, St Andrew's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

CS-11824-0000-D Compassion and Understanding to Persons 
Suffering from Physical and Psychological Problems. Church and 
Society, St. Andrew's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

FM-12868-0071-D Human Sexuality. Church and Society, St. 
Andrew's UMC, San Antonio, TX. 

GJ-12219-08ie-D Policiee Regarding Socially Responsible 
Investments. Steve Hall, Pastor + 44 Members, St Joseph UMC, 
PikevilU, NC. 

CS-12427-8000-R Boards and Agencies Regarding Abortion. 
Adm. Bd, Task Force on Abortion & S.S. Class, St. Paul UMC, Bryan, 
TX. 

FA-11880-8000-R No Investment of Church Fund in Companies 
Involved in Pornographic Materials. Administrative Board, St. Paul 
UMC, Bryan, TX. 

CS-11817-800O-R Nationwide Health Insurance. Administrative 
Council, St Paul UMC, College, AK 

CS-12208-8000-M$ Task Force on Children. Administrative 
Council, St Paul UMC, College, AK 

CS-12284-S00O-M The American Family Association. 
Administrative Council and Marie Watson, St Paul UMC, College and 
West Point, AK and MS. 



DI-11821-8000-R TheBookofWca-ship. Administrative Board, St 
Paul UMC, College, AK. 

FA-1188ft4000-R Apportionments Voluntary, Not Mandatory. 
Administrative Board, St. Paul UMC, College, AK. 

FA-11981-8000-M Funds for Task Forces. Administrative Council. 
St Paul UMC. College, AK 

FM-118S8-S0OO-R Support Confu-mation Preparatory for FvJl 
Church Membership. Administrative Board, St. Paul UMC, College, 
AK. 

GJ-118eO-8000-R Lay Representatives. Administrative Board, St. 
Paul UMC, College, AK. 

GM-11984-8000-M Tent Building Ministries. Administrative 
Board, St Paul UMC, College, AK 

IC-118e4-8000-R Media Release Disclaimer. Administrative 
Board, St Paul UMC, College, AK 

MN-11908-8000-R Non-Seminary Pastors. Administrative Board, 
St Paul UMC, College, AK 

MN-11906-8000-R Limit Bishops' Terms. Petition Committee 
Appointed by Adm. Council, St Paul UMC, College, AK 

FA-11266-S0OO-R Limit budget increase for the next 
quadrennium 1993 - 1996. Administrative Board, St Paul UMC, East 
Alton, R,. 

FM-10098-0071-D Human Sexuality, Members of St Paul UMC 
& Jamestown DisL WNY Conf, St Paul UMC, Jamestown, NY. 

LC-11496-0247-D ' Local church's right to set apportionment 
acceptance. Administrative Board, St Paul UMC, Las Cruces, NM. 

CS-lie72-0071-D Adoption and the Social Principles. 
Administrative Council, St Peter's UMC, Morehead City, NC. 

GM-122S6-1489-D The Purpose of Health and Welfare Ministries 
Department. Administrative Council, St Peter's UMC, Morehead City, 
NC. 

MN-lie97-8000-R Council of Bishops Initiate and Sponsor 
Deliberations. Paul T. Stallsworth, NCA. 

CO-12166-0610-D Speaking fcr the Church. David M. Stanley, 
Wesley UMC, Muscatine, lA. 

CO-12259-0611-D The Book of Resolution. David M. Stanley, 
Wesley UMC, Muscatine, lA. 

C8-12169-8000-R Opposition to a Call for a Constitutional 
Convention. David M. Stanley, Wesley UMC, Muscatine, JA. 

FA-12269-0909-D Responsibility of the General Council on 
Finance and Administration. David M. Stanley, Wesley UMC, 
Muscatine, lA. 

GJ-12174-0806-D Limit Membership of General Boards, Agenciee 
and Councils to 60. David M. Stanley, Wesley UMC, Muscatine, lA. 

CO-11242-0607-D Voting Requirements for Clergy Benefits. 
Edmund B. Stanton, ORI. 

CO-11244-0704-D Voting Requirements for Cergy Benefits. 
Edmund B. Stanton, ORL 

LC-11S12-0227-D Affiliate and Associate Membership. Edmund 
B. Stanton, ORI. 

FA-11876-0911-D Policies of General Finance and 
Administration. Board of Stewards, First, Stone First UMC 10 
individual* Covenant UMC, Griffin, GA. 

CS-1220&4000-R Publication of Information on Land Value 
Taxation. Nadine Stoner, First UMC, Beloit, WI. 

GJ-11829.0814-D ReeponsibiUties of Elected Staff. Robert Morton 
Stout, BLT. 

GJ-11617-800O-RI Study to Merge the GBCS, GCRR and GCSRW. 
Robert Morton Stout, BLT. 

MN-12480-0458-D Complaint Procedures. Cabinet and General 
Conference Delegation, STX. 

CO-121S8-0606-D Number of Bishops to be Elected in a 
Jurisdictional Conference. General Conference Delegates, STX 

CO-12166-0628-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
Delegates, STX. 

MN-12192-0486-D General Provisions for Clergy Members. 
Delegates, STX. 

CO-1111S-0701-D Participation of Lay Members of the Annual 
Conference in Matters of Ordination. Administration Council, Sugar 
Grove UMC, New Castle, IN. ' 

C8-11162-0071-D Decision Concerning Divorce. Sunday School 
Class, Sunday Seekers UMC, Fairport, NY. 

CS-11296-8000-R All UM Agencies Cease Housing and Support of 
Religious Coalitiori for Abortion Rights. Claude Swafford, Holly 
Avenue UMC, South Pittsburg, TN. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



66 



MN-118284iOOO-R The Appointnxent of Pastors to the Mission 
Society. Claude Swafford and Arthur R. Kirk EOH Conf., Holly 
Avenue UUC, South PitUhurg, TN. 

LC-1222&0261<D Lay Member of the Annual Conference. James 
L. Swollen, Hyde Park Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

MN-122S0-8O0O-M The Problem of Inept Ministers. Norma 
Swanson, Atlanta, GA. 

CO-11119-S000-R Election and Assignment of Bishops. U.Thos. 
Swantner, CJh. 

LC-11147.026a-D The Composition of the Local Church 
Pastor-Parish Committee. M. Thoa. Swantner, CIL. 

CS-10282-S0OO-R Capital Punishments. SWE. 

C8-102874J00O-R Pollution in Metropolitan Areas. SWE. 

C8-10294-8000-R Discontinue Tests of Nuclear Weapons. SWE. 

FA-lOeiO-aOOO-R Ministerial Support. SWE. 

LC-10218-020e-D Cooperative Parish Ministries. SWE. 

HE-1 109S-8000-R Policy Forbidding the Bearing of Arms. 
Lawrence V. Tagg, IWA. 

DI-11078-S0OO-R9 Consultation/Warkshop to Enhance the Gifts 
and Skills of Spiritual Directors. Task Force on Christian Spiritual 
Formation, MNN. Perham, MN. 

MN-12181-0000-D The Ordained Ministry - Tenure. R Gregory 
Tate, KEN. 

MN-12186-O40S-D Categories of Local Pastors. R. Gregory Tale. 
KEN. 

MN-12187^>418-D Amenability of Probationary Members to the 
Annual Conference Regarding Performance in Ministry. R. Gregory 
Tate, KEN. 

MN-12188-0419-D Eligibility and Rights of Associate Members. 
R. Gregory Tate, KEN. 

MN-1219<M>428-D Rights and Responsibilities of Full Members. 
R. Gregory Tale, KEN. 

MN-1066(M)422-D Members in Full Connection. TCFE. 

FM-10807-800O>R Human Sexuality. Retain present language as 
sUted in the 1988 Book of Discipline. TEN, MSS, FLA, NIN, SIN, 
PEN. 

CC-1009e«eS8-D Central Conference Episcopal Appointment. 
TEN. 

CO-10192-0726-D Age Level and Family Ministries. TEN. 

GJ-10372-80OO-R Celebration of Ministry Day. TEN. 

LC-10282-0268-D The Committee on Pastor/Parish Relations. 
TEN. 

FA-11866-O00O-D Office Location of General Agencies, Boards, 
Commissions and Organizations. John Terneus, Yukon, OK. 

OJ-1148S-2862-D$ General Commission on the Status and Role of 
Conservations. John Terneus, Yukon, OH. 

FM-1288e-8000-R Membership of the Homosexual Study 
Committee. John Terons, Yukon, OK 

FA-1228&4000-R Invitation to Consider Relocation to Texas. 
Division of Missions, TEX. 

IC-10977-S000-R Television and Radio Advertisement Campaign. 
TEX. 

IC-11627-S0OO-R The Mass Media Agenda of our Denomination. 
TEX. 

GJ-10667-021S-D The Meaning of Membership. TFCE. 

GJ-10668-0418-D Eligibility and Rights of Probationary 
Membership. TFCE. 

GJ-1 0669-04 IS-D Discontinuance from Pk'obationary Membership. 
TFCE. 

GJ-lOeei-0440-D Disobedience to the Order and Discipline of the 
Church. TFCE. 

OJ-10e024)448-D Leave of Absence. TFCE. 

GJ-106a8-0460-D Disability Leave. TFCE. 

GJ-10ee4-04Sl-D Retired Ordained Ministers. TFCE. 

6J-10e66-04fi8-D Grievance Procedures. TFCE. 

GJ-lOeae-OSlS-D Presidential Duties of Bishops. TFCE. 

OJ-10ee7-0788-D Confidentiality in the Interviewing and 
Reporting Process. TFCE. 

GJ-lOeeS-OOOO-D Duties and Responsibilities of the Jurisdictional 
Council. TFCE. 

GJ-10e69-2601-D Membership Guidelines for the Judicial 
Council. TFCE. 

GJ-1 0070-2602-0 Alternate Membership of the Judicial Council. 
TFCE. 



GJ-10e71-2e08-D Filling Vacancies on the Judicial Council. 
TFCE. 

GJ-10e72-2e06-D Membership in Judicial from a Central 
Conference. TFCE. 

GJ-10678-2606-D Method of Organization and Procedure for the 
Judicial Council. TFCE. 

6 J-1 0674-2609-0 Defining Whose Action can be Heard by the 
Judicial Council. TFCE. 

GJ-1067S-2610-O Actions of the Judicial Council. TFCE. 

GJ-10676.2ei2-D The Judicial Council. TFCE. 

GJ-10677-2611-D Hearing and Determination of Appeals on a 
Judicial Council. TFCE. 

GJ-10e7S-2618-D Trial Court. TFCE. 

GJ-10679-2614-D Opinion or Decision of a Committee on Appeals. 
TFCE. 

GJ-10e80-2ei6-O Declaratory Decisions. TFCE. 

GJ-10e81-2610-O Confidentiality in the Judicial Process. TFCE. 

GJ-10682-2618-O Decision of the Judicial Council. TFCE. 

GJ-1068S-2619-O Filingof Judicial Council Decisions. TFCE. 

GJ-10684-2620-O Preliminary Assumptions. TFCE. 

GJ-10686-2a21-D Chargeable Offenses. TFCE. 

GJ-1 0686.2622-D Guidelinee on Charges. TFCE. 

GJ-10687-262S-D Investigation Procedures. TFCE. 

GJ-1068S-2624-O Fundamental Principles and the Joint Review 
Process. TFCE. 

GJ-10689-2625-D General Appeal Procedures. TFCE. 

GJ-1069O-2e26-D Miscellaneous Provisions. TFCE. 

GJ-10691-8000-R Administrative and Judicial Procedures 
Manual. TFCE. 

GJ-10692-SOOO-S Report of the Task Fcrce to Study Chapter VIII. 
TFCE. 

MN-11887-0818-D Mandatory Retirement for Diaconal Ministers. 
John Ross Thom.pson, Mars, PA. 

MN-11902-0618-O Limitations on Tears of Service. John Ross 
Thompson, Mars, PA. 

DI-10104-0729-O Support Present Language in the Book of 
Worship. Marilyn B. Thompson, First UMC, StarkviUe, MS. 

DI-10106-1214-O Retain Present Language. Marilyn B. 
Thompson, First UMC, StarkviUe, MS. 

FA-1108O«000-R Relocation of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. Marilyn B. Thompson, First UMC, Starksville, MS. 

GJ-10124-0815-D Racial Inclusiveness. Marilyn B. Thompson, 
First UMC, Starkville, MS. 

LC-10186-0216-D Admission of Children into Church 
Membership. Marilyn B. Thompson, First UMC, Starkville, MS. 

MN-11107-0481-D Qualifications for Ordination. Marilyn B. 
Thompson + 11 Individual + 3 Organizations, First UMC, Starksville 
and Bastrop, MS and LA. 

MN-lllie-0788-O Candidate for Ordained Ministry. Marilyn B. 
Thompson + 9 Individuals + 2 Adm. Boards, First UMC, Starksville, 
MS. 

CS-12211-8000-R The World Community. Richard H. 
Timherlake, Kingsport, TN. 

FA-112e2-072O-D Provision for Adequate and Fair Clergy 
Compensation. Martin Toepke-Floyd, NDA. 

CO-11189-0612-O Interjunsdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
United Methodist Town and Rural Fellowships, NCJ Committee on 
Episcopacy. 

FA-1289S-0906-D Fiscal Responsibilities. Human Sexuality. 
Administrative Board, Trinity UMC + 515 individuals and 261 groups, 
Richmond, VA. 

CS-114e2-S0OO-R Adopt "Right to Life". Administrative Board, 
Trinity UMC, Annapolis, MD. 

FM-128e4-0071-D Human Sexuality. Administrative Council, 
Trinity UMC, Bakersfield, CA and Grace Church, Newport, KY. 

IX;-11108-0260-D Establishment of a Volunteer Work Area. 
Administrative Board Trinity UMC, Denver, CO. 

FM-12857-0071-O Human Sexuality. Amend 71F. 
Administrative Board Trinity UMC, Pickerington, OH. 

FA-11609-8000-R Budget Reflecting 198992 Receipts. 
Administrative Board Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA. 

GJ-1 1616.S00O-R Funding of New Study Committeee. 
Administrative Board, Trinity UMC, Richmond, VA. 

FA-118284)911-D Direct Support of Missionaries. Administrative 
Board Trinity UMC, Waycross, GA. 



66 



May 5. 1992 



CS-I028a4000-R 

cs-iose4-sooo-R 

CS-10965-8000-R 
FM-10096-0071-D 



6J-11848-S0OO-R General Council on Ministries be Dissolved b; 
1996. Adminiatraiive Board, Trinity UMC, Waycroat, GA. 

GM-11861-1404-D Authority of the General Board of Global 
Ministries. Adminiatrative Board, Trinity UMC, Waycroaa, GA. 

IC-llSee-SOOO-R Dissolve COSROW by 1996. Adminiatratiue 
Board, Trinity UMC, Waycroaa, GA. 

MN-11410-0S1S-D Retired Relationship. Adminiatraiive Board, 
Trinity UMC. York, PA. 

FM-10017-0071-D Christian Marriage. Amend para. 71-C. Troy 
Diatrict Miniatera & Membera of Woodiawn UMC, AFU Troy, AL. 

MN-10168-0404-D Certified Candidates for Ordained Ministry. 
Troy Diatrict Miniatera, Troy, AL. 

MN-10162-0414-D Qualifications for Election. Troy Diatrict 
Miniatera, Firat UMC, Troy, AL. 

C8-10278-8000-R The Environment. TRY. 

A Sustainable Society for Pollution. TRY. 
A More Economically Just Society. TRY. 
The World's Children. TRY. 
Human Sexuality. TRY. 

FM-10S41-S0OO-R9 Rename the "Committees to Study 
Homosexuality". TRY. 

GJ-10S6&4000-M Retain the General Council on Ministries. 
37? y. 

GJ-10617-S000-R Opposition to Cdombus Day as a National 
Holiday. 77? y. 

GJ-1061»4000-R Hundred Dollar HoUday. TRY. 

IC-10278-S000-R Covenant Communion with the Churches of 
Christ Uniting. 77?y. 

LC-10066-0227-D Affiliate and Associate Membership. 77? y. 

LC-10078-02a9-D Lay Leader as Chairperson of Local Church 
Conunittee on Nominations and Personnel. 77? y. 

MI^-10086-0448-D Persons leave - eligible.for Committee 
Membership. TRY. 

MN-1008<M>752-D Nimiber of Laity on District Committee of 
Ordained Ministry. 77?y. 

MN-10148-(Vi02-D Acceptance of Self-avowed Practicing 
Homosexuals. 77?y. 

MN-10ie6-044S-D 

MN-1O481-S0OO-R 
Ministers. 77? y. 

MN-11448-0618-D Grievance Procedures Against Bishops. Bishop 
Jack M. Tuell, Loa Angela Area. 

MN-121824)S12-D Transfer of Diaconal Ministers. Ann ry2«r, 
WNC. 

MN-121SSA)S1S-D Disability or Medical Leave. Ann Tyler, WNC. 

MN-121844S15-D Diaconal Minister's Relationship to the 
Employing Agency . Ann Tyler, WNC. 

MN-12186-0817-D Termination Procedures for Diaconal 
Ministers. Ann Tyler, WNC. 

G<r-10eSS-2624-O Trial Procedures. UCOM. 

IC-I0O34-19O6-D ' Re^onsibilitiee of the General Conmiission on 
Communications. UCOM. 

IC-106S64000-R Vision Inta^th Satellite Network. UCOM. 

IC-106S7-S00O-R Communicatians Access for Persons Who Have 
Hearing and Si^t Impairments. UCOM. 

MN-11761-SOOO-R Call to the Bishops to Undergird Cooperative 
Parish Ministry. UM Rural Fellowahip and Church and Comm. 
Workers, Columbua, OB. 

FA-11710-0721-D Authorization for an Annual Conference to 
Form a Basic Salary Plan. UM Rural Fellowahip, Church and 
Community Workera, Nat. Workera Nat Organ. Upper Sand Mt Pariah 
Staff, Columbus OB, SylvaniaAL. 

CS-12419-S000-M$ Task Force Regarding Abortion. 
Adminiatrative Board, Union Center UMC, Endioott, NY. 

FM-12S86-S000-R IVaining for Transforming Congregations. 
Administrative Board, Union Center UMC, Endioott, NY. 

FA-11762-0724-D Reporting Pastor's Expenses in the Annual 
Conference Journal. United Melhodiat Clergy Couples, Chesapeake, VA. 

GJ-11764-2e2S-D Investigation Procedures. United Methodist 
Clergy Couples, Chesapeake, VA. 

LC-11774-020&-D The Pastoral Charge. United Methodist Clergy 
Couples, Chesapeake, VA. 

LC-11 776-0260-0 Responsibilities of the Administrative Board. 
United Methodist Clergy Couples, Chesapeake, VA. 



Family Leave. 77?y. 

Alternate Path for Consecration as Diaconal 



MN-1177WM26-D Appointments of Ordained Ministers firom 
Other Annual Conferences. United Methodiat Clergy Couples, 
Chesapeake, VA. 

MN-11777-0682-D The Appointment Making Criteria. United 
Methodiat Clergy Couples, Cheaapeake, VA. 

CO-11699-060d-D Term Episcopacy. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowahip and. Upper Sand Mountain Pariah Staff, Sylvania, ALt 
Columbua, OB. 

CO-11700-0628-D Repreeentation fi«m Small Churches on 
General and Jurisdictional Boards. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip 
and Upper Sand, Mountain Pariah Staff, Sylvania, AL, Columbua, OB. 

CO-11701-0701-D Voting RigfaU fiir Associate Members and Local 
Pastors. United Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

CO-11702-0706-D Part-Time Local Past<rs Serving on Annual 
Conference Agencies. United Methodiat Rural Fellowship, Columbus, 
OB. 

CO-11708-0726-D Responsibilities of the Conference Direetcr. 
United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

CO-11704-S000-R Reduction at Radon Hazards in Church 
Property. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

CS-11706-8000-R The Church's Response to Changing Rural 
Issues. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

CS-1 1 706-8000-R Reducti on of Water Usage by United 
Methodists. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

DI-11707-0280-D Lay Preachers for Assignment by District 
Superintendents. United Melhodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

DI-11708-1201-D General Board of Discipleship Responsibilities. 
United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

DI-11 709-1202-D Adding Language to Paragraph 1202 which 
Indicates Responsibilities of the GBOD. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbua, OB. 

FA-11711-«000-M$ Church-VTide Study of Justice and Equity 
Issues Related to Clergy Salary and Support. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Upper Sand Mountain Parish Staff, Sylvania, AL, 
Columbua, OB. 

GJ-11712-0276-D Setting Rural Life Sunday on the Fifth Sunday 
After Easter. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, <2olumbus, OB. 

GJ-1171S-027e-D Establishing Rural Life Sunday as a Special 
Sunday with Annual Conference Offering. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

GJ-11714-080e-D Small Membership Church Representation on 
General Church Boards and Agencies. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbua, OB. 

GM-11716-0781-D Assign, of Conference Mission and Outreach to 
Ann. Con£ Comm. on Parish and Community Development. United 
Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

GM-117ie-1414-D GBGM/Nat. Div. Responsibilities Related to 
Needs of Small Membership Churches. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

GM-11717-8000-R Increasing the Number of Church and 
Community Workers. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, 
OB. 

GM-11718-S0OO-R United Methodist Mission in Appalaehia. 
United Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

GM-11719-8000-R An Affirmation of Basic Rural Worth. UniUd 
Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

GM-11720-3000-M$ Rural Crisis: Special Program UniUd 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

HE-11721-1580.D Chairs of Town and Country Ministry at 
United Methodist Seminaries. United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, 
Columbua, OB. 

HE-11722-S0OO-R Rural Chaplaincy as a Ministry of Laity and 
Clergy. United Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

IC-1172S-S0OO-M$ Study on Racism in Rural Areas. United 
Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

LC-11724-02O1-D "EvangeUstic, Nurture and Witness" language 
which indicates basic re^onsibilities of UMCs. United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

LC-11726-0206-D Teaching Parish. United Methodiat Rural 
Fellowahip, Columbus, OB. 

LC-1172e-0206-D A New Form of Cooperative Parish Ministry. 
United Methodist Rural Fellowahip, Columbua, OB. 

LC-11727-0244-D The Administrative Council - Basic 
Administrative Structure. United Methodiat Rural Fellowahip, 
Columbua, OB. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



67 



LC-11728-0346-D The AdministratiTe Council u the Buic 
AdnuniBtrative Structure for Local Churches. Uniied Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbus, OH. 

LC-1 1729-0262-D The Administrative Council as the Basic 
Administrative Structure for UMC. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

BiIN-1178OO40a-D Local Pastor Authority and Duties. United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11781-O40S-D Membership of Local Pastors on Annual 
Conference Boards, Commissions and Committees. United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OH. 

MN-11 782-04 12-D Local Pastors as Members of an Annual 
Conference. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OH. 

MN-11788-04ie-D Elimination of the Category - Associate 
Member of the Annual Conference. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11784-0419-D Eliminate the Category - Associate Member of 
the Annual Conference. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 786-0420-D Elimination of the Category - Associate 
Member of the Annual Conference. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11786-0421-D Elimination of the Category -AssodaU 
Member of the Annual Conference. United Methodist Rural * 

Fellowship, Columbus, OH. 

MN-11 7S8-048S-D Older Associate Members and the Order of 
Elder. United Melodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OH. 

MN-1178»«487-D Tent-Making/Bi- Vocational and Part-Time 
Ministry. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 740-0489-D Responsibility of Pastors for Ministry in the 
Community Contexts of Churches. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
Columbus, OB. 

MN-1 1741-0609-D Term Episcopacy and Use of the Htle of 
"Bishop". United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11742-0610-D Term Episcopacy - Status of Bishops Retired 
Prior to 1996. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11748-0614-D Specific Responsibilities of Bishops. United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 744-0628-D Empowerment of District Superintendents with 
Small Membership Churches and Cooperative Ministries. United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-1 1748-0682-D Including Community Contexts as a Criterion 
to be Taken into Account when Appointments are made. United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11746-06S4-D Longer Tenure of Pastors in Appointments to 
the Local Church. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11747-0788-D Addition of Ordained Associate Member as 
Observer on the Conference Board of Ordained Ministry. United 
Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11748-0781-D Responsibilities of the Conference Board of 
Global Ministries. UnitedMethodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-1174»«76a-D Addition of Laity as Full Members of the 
District Committee on Ordained Ministry. United Methodist Rural 
Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11760-1628-D Addition of Laity to the Division of Ordained 
Ministry of the GBHEM. United Methodist Rural Fellowship, 
Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 762-8000-Mt Study of Episcopal Tenure. United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 768-SOOO-R Appointment of Clergy to Rural Ministry. 
UniUd Methodist Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

MN-11 787-0424-D Requirements for Admission. United Methodist 
Rural Fellowship, Columbus, OB. 

FA-12004-0710-D World Service Apportionments. United 
Methodists for More Faithful Ministry, Arlington, VA. 

GM-12007-1411-D Genval Board of Global Ministries, World 
Service Apportionment. United Methodists for More Faithful Ministry, 
Arlington, VA. 

GM-1200S-1427-D General Board of Global Ministries Women's 
Division, Undesignated Funds. United Methodists for More Faithful 
Ministry, Arlington, VA. 

IC-12010-2406-D Representatives to the World and National 
Councils of Churches. United Methodists for More Faithful Ministry, 
Arlington, VA. 



Number of Bishops in Each Jurisdiction. VZR. 
National Comprehensive Energy Policy. VZR. 
Renewal of the Stewardship Covenant. VIR. 
Basic Salary Plan. VZR. 
Investigation and Prosecution of Hate Crimes. 



IC-12011-2407-D Financial Support for the National and Wcrld 
Councils of Churches. United Methodists for More Faithful Ministry, 
Arlington, VA. 

LC-11881-2627-D Charge or Cooperative Parish Board of 
IVusteee. Paul Van Dine, Robert and Frances Keifer, Cypress Lake 
UMC, Fort Myers, FL. 

LC-1018»«261-D Reeponsibilities of the Lay Leader and the PPR 
Committee. Albert J. Varolii, Landers Chapel UMC, Linoolnton, NC. 

MN-10178-0788-D Registrars Responsibility to Supervising 
Pastors. Board of Ordained Ministries, VIR. 

MN-10167-O4O4-D The Explcring Candidate and Supervising 
Pastor. Board of Ordained Ministry, VIR 

FA-12266-S000-R Limit the General Church Apportionments. 
Cabinet, VIR. 

CO-10097-0606-D 

C8-1016O-800O-R 

CS-10882-8000-R 

FA-1084O-S00O-R 

FM-10092-0071-D 
VIR. 

FM-10S12-8000-R New Mission Statement. VIR. 

OM-10128-1411-D World Service Apportionments. V7R 

LC-10076-02a9-D Pastor-Parish Relations Committee. VZR. 

LC-1 081 7-0249-D Election of the Committee on Nomination and 
Personnel. V7B. 

MN-12S80-O402-D Delete the Ban on Gay Ordination. Dan Wagle, 
Belen Wagna and Richard Waymans, Orant Park Aldersgate UMC, 
Atlanta, QA. 

CS-11297-8000-R Drug Trafficking and Covert Operation. Barry 
Wagner, 3l Paul UMC, Lawton, OK. 

GJ-1217S-0274-D Reduce Number of Special Days with Offering. 
Leon Wagnon, HI, SCA. 

MN-12116-0424-D Requirements for Admission. Joyce Waits, 
Lakewood UMC, Lake Odessa, MI. 

MN-12191-0428-D Rights and Responsibilities of Full Members. 
Charles N. Waldo, Indianapolis, IN. 

MN-12194-8000-M United Methodist Policy that all Churches 
Shall Have a Pastor. Charles N. Waldo, Indianapolis, IN. 

MN-12248-048e-D Appointment to Various Ministries. Charles N. 
Waldo, Indianapolis, IN. 

MN-12S9e-0402-D The Definition of Celibacy. A<imtnutra«iue 
Board -^ 2S Individuals, Walker Memorial, Ooldboro District, NC. 

MN-11411-0404-D The Certified Candidate. Administrative 
Councils, Wallace, Fellowship, Micro, Beston, Walker and Woodland 
UMCs, NCA. 

MN-11497-0426-D Ministers from Other Denominations. TedB. 
Walter, SCA. 

MN-11498-0427-D Ministers from Other Denominations. TedH. 
Walter, SCA. 

MN-116004466-D Re-admission after Durrender of Ministerial 
Office. Ted H. Walter, SCA. 

DI-liei4-1224-D Curriculum Resources Materials. 
Administrative Board, Washington Pike UMC, Knoxuille. TN. 

FA-12296-8000-R Relocate General Board of Global Ministries, 
Site te be Selected by 1994. Members, Washington Pike UMC, 
Knoxuille, TN. 

CS-1126&4000-R Discontinuance of the Pamphlet "Faithful 
Witness on Today's Issues". Administration Board, Social Concerns 
and COM, WatervilU UMC. Waterville, OB. 

C8-11268-8000-R Discontinue Membership in and all Forxns of 
Support te Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights. Administrative 
Board, Social Concerns, COM, WaUrville UMC, Waterville, OH. 

CS-10064-0072-D Growing Populations. Walter K. Waymeyer. 
Claremont UMC, La Verne, CA. 

FA-12218-8000-D The Apportionmenta Christine Weatherby, 
Hubbard UMC, Bubbard, TX. 

CS-11070-8000-R Accessibility Tegarding Handicapping 
Conditions. Nancy J. Webb, St Paul UMC, New Windsor, MD. 

CS-1 11 66-0072-D Rights of Persons with Handicapping 
Conditions. Nancy J. Wehb, St Paul UMC, New Windsor, MD. 

MN-11112-0680-D Persons with Handicapping Conditions in the 
Appointment Making Process. Nancy J. Webb, St Paul UMC, New 
Windsor, MD. 

MN-12042-04ie-D Candidate* Preparing for Ordination Through 
Ministerial Course of Study. Doris Weddington, WNC. 



68 



May 5, 1992 



MN-1204S-0420-D Requirements for Election as Assodate 
Members. Doria Weddington, WNC. 

FM-12S88-0071-D Human Sexuality. Admin. Bd.,and UM 
Federation for Social Action^ Wesley Churchy Minneapolis, MN. 

LC-11S28-0217-D Admission into the Church. Wesley Foundation, 
Robert J. Bailey, Gulf Breeze, FL. 

MN-11548-0442-D Appointment Beyond the Local United 
Methodist Church. Wesley Foundation, Robert J. Bailey, Gulf Breeze^ 
FL. 

MN-11S44-«44S-D Appointment Beyond the Local United 
Methodist Church. Wesley Foundation, Robert J. Bailey, Gulf Breeze, 
FL. 

HE-11960-SOOO-R Accountability of Methodist Seminaries. 
Administrative Board, Wesley Memorial UMC and 6 Individual 
Members, Milton, FL. 

CO-11811-S000-R Matters at General Conference. Administrative 
Board + 3 Individuals, Wesley Memorial UMC, Milton, PL. 

DI-12266-1224-D$ Church Curriculum Resources. Wesley 
Memorial UMC + 4 Individuals, Wesley Memorial UMC, Milton, FL. 

FA-118S6-S00O-R AfBrmative Inveettnents. Administrative Board 
+ 4 Individuals, Wesley Memorial UMC, Milton, FL. 

MN-1196S-S0OO-M Voting and Sacramental Rights for Clergy. 
Administrative Board + 3 Individuals, Wesley Memorial UMC, Milton, 
FL. 

CO-11802-0086-C Composition of the Annual Conference. 
Administrative Council, Wesley UMC, Ft. Worth, TX. 

GJ-12429-2e21-D Chargeable Offenses. Administrative Council, 
Wesley UMC, Ft Worth, TX. 

FA-118S2-S000-R Church Budget. Administrative Board + 4 
Individuals, Wesley UMC, Milton, FL. 

GJ-12278-2e21-D Chargeable Offenses for Ministers. 
Administrative Board + 5 Individuals, Wesley UMC, Milton, FL. 

GJ-1222S4000-M Reorganizing and Streamlining Church. 12 
Members, West Bend UMC, Clay City, KY. 

DM126(V4000-R Oppose the New "God Language". 
Administrative Council, West Independence UMC, Fostorin, OH. 

CO-1150&M07-D Assignment and Termination of Bishops. Jim 
M. West, LRK. 

MN-11887-0468-D Joint Review Committee. Western Jurisdiction 
Committee on Episcopacy, Helena, MT. 

MN-11899-0618-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. 
Western Jurisdiction Committee on Episcopacy, Helena, MT. 

CO-11401-S000-R Celebrating 100 Years of Lay Education in the 
IVadition of Scarritt Bennett Center. Marilyn Wkaley Winters and 
Maxine Clarke Beach, Scarritt-Bennett Center Board and Exec 
Director., Nashville, TN. 

FM-li2884-SO0O-R Accept Recommendation of GCOM for 
Comprehensive Study. Administrative Board, Wieadon UMC, 
Evanston, IL. 

FM-12844-0072-D Rights of Lesbians, Gay Men and Bisexuals. 
Administrative Council, Wheadon UMC, Evanston, IL. 

CS-114ei-«000-R The Pediatric Bill of Righte Preamble. United 
Methodist Women and Burkey Turk Jr., OK, Wheatland UMC, Dallas, 
TX. 

LC-111284)248-D The Church Conference. D. Max Whitfield, 
NAK 

CO-115(»fl701-D Voting RighU of Associate and Afeiiate Clergy 
Members of Annual Conference. Calvin Whitley, Sand Mountain UMC, 
Sand Mountain, CH. 

MN-11586-0408-D Categoriee of Local Pastors. Calvin Whitley, 
Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain, 

MN-11M6-0418-D Eligibility and Rights of Probationary 
Members. Calvin Whitley, Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain. 

MN-11588-0417-D Continuation in Probationary Membership. 
Calvin Whitley, Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain. 

MN-11689-0419-D Eligibility and Rights of Associate Members. 
Calvin Whitley, Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain. 

MN-1164(M)420-D Requirements {a Election as Associate 
Members. Calvin Whitley, Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain. 

MN-11641-0424-D Requirements fcr Admission. Calvin Whitley, 
Sand Mountain UMC, Sand Mountain. 

CS-1240(M00O-R Issues of Pornography. Helen C. Wilbur, First 
UMC, Washington, NC. 

GJ-11S42-0806-D General Agency Membership. Bishop Richard 
B. Wilke and Marilynn Loyd, LRK 



GJ-11S48-1007-D Organization of the General Council on 
Ministries. Bishop Richard B. Wilke and Marilynn Loyd, LRK 

GJ-H847-8000-M$ Task Fotco for Creation of General Board of 
Evangelism and Church Develc^ment. Bishop Richard B. Wilke and 
Marilynn Loyd, LRK 

DI-11862-S00O-R Make Evangelion the # 1 Priority for the Next 
Quadrennium. Administrative Board, Williams Center Asbury UMC, 
Bryan, OB. 

CS-12409-0071-D Abortion. Administrative Council, Williams 
Center Asbury UMC, Bryan, OH. 

LC-1114S-0268-D$ The Committee on Pastcr-Parbh Relations. 
David B. Wilson, LRK 

IC-11808-2402-D The National Council of the Church of Christ in 
the USA and the W<»-ld Council of Churches. Theron L. Wilson, 
Walker Chapel UMC, Arlington, VA. 

CS-1242ft^00O.R Sanctity of Human Life Sunday. 75% of the 
congregation, Windsor UMC, Windsor, OH. 

LC-10S16-0280-D Grace Period for Inactive Members of a Local 
UMC. WISandNIN. 

IC-10S68-3000-R Churches in Covenant Communities. WIS, 
MNN, CNV, PEN, SNJ. 

CO-10152-072»-D Selection of Conference Council Director. WIS. 

CO-109ei-0088-C Election of Ministerial Delegates to General 
and Jurisdictional Conferences. WIS. 

CO-10962-00S9-C Method of Election of Lay Delegates to Gena-al 
and Jurisdictional Conferences. WIS. 

CS-10eO4-80OO-R Resolution on The United Natiom. WIS. 

FA-10829-0718-D Basic Salary Plan. WIS. 

GJ-10808-2606-D Judicial Council Members Right to Consult 
Outside on Cases Pending. ^75. 

GJ-lO81fr'2028-D Blocking an Abuse of Discretion About Accused 
and Accusers Meeting in Committee on Investigation. WIS. 

GJ-10811-2628-D Nomination of the Committee on Investigation. 
WIS. 

GJ-10870-8000-R Columbus Observance. WIS. 

IC-10815-2102-D Strengthening General Commission on Religion 
Race. WIS. 

LC-10818-0266-D Housing as Remuneration. WIS. 

MN-10261-0788-D Laity as Full Members of Annual Conference of 
Board of Ordained Ministers. MOE, WIS. 

MN-1082e-073S-D Nomination of Board of Ordained Ministry. 
WIS. 

MN-10327-0762-D Granting Full Voting Participation to Lay 
Members of District Committees on Ordained Ministry. WIS. 

MN-10828-0617-D Selection and Assignment of District 
Superintendent. WIS. 

CO-1004&4706-D Conference Agency Memba^hip. WML 

DI-10992-8000-R The Service of the Dedication of Infants. WMI. 

GJ-10061-0806-D Program Board Basic Membership. WML 

GJ-10062-OSOS-D General Program Board Additional 
Membership. WMI. 

MN-10822-0424-D Admission and Continuance in the Order of 
Elder. WMI 

MN-10828-O186-D Admission and Continuance of Full 
Membership in Annual Conference and Order of Elder. WMI. 

MN-1 0012-0402-D Ordination of Homosexuals. Retain para. 402.2. 
WNC + 20 other annual conferences. 

LC-12280-0269-D Diaconal Ministers Appointed Be^yond the Local 
Church. Board of Diaconal Ministry. WNC. 

LC-12282-0269-D Diaconal Ministry Advisory Committee. Board 
of Diaconal Ministry, WNC. 

DI-1182O-8000-R Adopt "\rision 2000". Council on Ministries, 
WNC. 

FA-122S7-8000-R Clergy Compensation Form for Use in the 
United Methodist Church. Ministers of the Albemarle District, WNC. 

MN-10018-0406-D Authority and Duties of Local Pastors. Retain 
para. 406. WNC, MOE, HOL. 

DI-10007-0280-D Lay Preachers. Recognize and Utilize the 0£5ce 
of Lay Preachers. WNC. 

FA-lOSSe-SOOO-R Reduction of Denominational Budget and 
Bureaucracy. WNC. 

FA-1089O^000-R Denominational Health Care Plan. WNC. 

HE-10009-0782-D Board of Higher Education and Campus 
Ministry. Amend para. 732.1. WNC. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



69 



LC-lOOl 1-0288-0 T«nure of Paatcr-Parish CommittM Members. 
Amend Para. 269.2a. WNC. 

MN-1086»«000-R Retain the Order of Deacon. WNC. 

Retain Orders of Deacon and Elder. WNC. 
United Methodist Trials Guidelines. WNJ. 
Local and Part-time Pastors Under 



Boycott K-Mart and Waldenbooks. WNY. 
Environmental Stewardship. WNY. 
Christian and Ministerial Conduct of Retired 



MN-10S67-S000-R 

GJ-10127-2824-D 

CO-10114-0701-D 
Appointment. WNY. 

CS-10164-S00O-R 

GM-1027e-146S-D 

MN-10S26-0461-D 
Ministers. WNY. 

FA-120S1-S0OO-M Self-Funded Health Insurance Program. Board 
of Church and Society, WOH. 

CO-10178-0606-D Bishops in Jurisdictions. Epucopacy 
Committee, WOH & DET. 

CO-10180-0612-D Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy's 
Responsibilities. Episcopacy Committee, WOH & 8DA. 

CO-112SS-062S-D Members of Jurisdictional Committee on 
Episcopacy. Episcopacy Committee, WOH. 

GJ-120«4-2a28-D Investigation Procedures. Dean W. Wolf, MNN. 

GJ-12086-2824-D General Trial Procedures. Dean W. Wolf MNN. 

MN-1204&4>4ft8-D Supervision During Grievance Proceedings. 
Dean W. Wolf, Minnesota Conference. 

MN-1 1029-0402-0 Disciplinary Use of the Word "Celibacy". 
Administrative Board, Woodland UUC, Goldsboro, NC. 

CC-11754-066S-D Concordat AgreemenU. DeWayne S. Woodring, 
Business Manager Comm^sion on General Conference, Indianapolis, IN. 

CO-117S6-0e0S-D Responsibilities of the Secretary ■ Designate of 
General Conference. DeWayne S. Woodring & Comm, on Plan of Org. 
A Rules, Business Manager of General Conference, Indianapolis, IN. 

CO-1176e^)e0e-D Rules of Order of General Confa-ence. 
DeWayne S. Woodring, Business Manager Com-mission on General 
Conference, Indianapolis, IN. 

CO-11757-Oeil-D ResponsibUities of the SecreUry of General 
Conference. DeWayne S. Woodring, Business Managa- of General 
Conference, Indianapolis, IN. 

MN-1110e-040S-D Continuance as a Local Pastor. Committee on 
Ministry, Butler District, WPA. 

CO-1 1607-0602-D Recognition of Reserve Delegates. Ethnic Local 
Church Concerns Committee, WPA. 

CO-11608-0608-D Recognition of Reserve Delegates. Ethnic Ijocal 
Church Concerns Committee, WPA. 

CO-11047-OeOe-D Eligibility for Election to the Episcopacy. WPA. 

CO-11048-0fi07-D Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy. WPA. 

CS-11048-0071-D Amendment to the Statement on Abortion. 
WPA. 

FA-11060-S00O-R Renaming Apportionments and Advance 
Special. WPA. 



FM-11061-SOOO-R Reaffirm the Doctrinal Standards. WPA 

OJ-11062-0274-D Life Style Covenant Sunday. WPA. 

MN-11068-0058-C Episcopal Supervision. WPA. 

GM-1 1 864-SOOO-R Church and Community Ministry Program. 
Adv. Committee of the Church and Community Workers, WVA. 

GM-11866-S00O-R Increase Number of Church and Community 
Workers. Committee for Church and Communify Workers, WVA 

CO-10099-0607-D Assignment Process of Bishop. WVA. 

C8-10060-O071-D Abortion. WVA. 

FM-10994-S0OO-R Baptism Study Dociunent Considerations. 
WVA. 

GU-10698-A0OO-R4 Establishment of Commission on Inclusivenees 
of Persons with Handicapping Conditions. WVA. 

LC-10279-02S1-D Removal of OfBcers and Filling Vacancies. 
WVA. 

IC-11S1(VSOOO-R Support the Coisultation on Church Union 
proposal. Conference on CCCUIC and William A. Highfield, WYO. 

FM-10274-8000-R Human and Civil Rights of Lesbian and Gay 
men. WYO, NIL, NYK. 

LC-10140-0261-D Reeponaibilitiee of the Chairperson of Worship. 
WYO, NIL 

LC-10145-2682-D Powers and Limitations of the Board of 
TVusteee. WYO, NYK. 

LC-10183-0208.D Church Membership. WYO. 

MN-10S58-SOOO-R Maintain Present Rules of Clergy 
Administering Sacraments. NNY and WYO. 

HE-11670-0000-D Selection Placement of Pastors to the Wesley 
Foundation. Board of Higher Education and Campus Ministry, YEL. 

IC-11167-tOOO-R The proposal of The Consultation on Church 
Union. Consultation on Church Union, YEL A CNV Conference, 
Burlingame, CA. 

CB-12207-8000-R Reaffirm Adoption as an Option for Families. 
YEL 

DI-L2212-S00O-M Permission to Enlarge Individual Hymns from 
the United Methodist Hymnal. YEL 

FA-12214-0719-D Clergy Support. YEL 

GJ-12222-SO0O-M Adopt "Gospel Call to a New Beginning". YEL 

CS-12408-0071-D Abortion. Celeste Yost, Linwood, NJ. 

MN-11097-0802-D The Nature of Diaeonal Ministry. RonoU V. 
Young, LVL 

FM-lieSO-SOOO-R "Grace Upon Grace" as the Official Mission 
Statement. Charles Yrigoyen, Jr., EPA. 

LC-10Oe7-O227-D Affiliate and Associate Membership. UMC, 
Zapata UMC, Zapata, TX. 

FA-110SS-SOOO-R< Zimbabwe Annual Conference Pension Fund. 
ZIM. 

FM-12S88-8000-R Approve and Adopt the Ordination of 
Homosexuals. Betty Zimm^man, LinctUn, IL 




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Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Wednesday, May 6th, 1992 



Vol.4 No. 2 



Conference Sets Time to Address Los Angeles Crisis 



United Methodists from around the world opened 
their top legislative assembly Tuesday afternoon in 
Louisville with a celebration of Holy Communion, then 
quickly were reminded of the broken world in which 
they met. 

As the 1992 General Conference delegates and hun- 
dreds of visitors greeted one another in the corridors of 
the Commonwealth Convention Center and completed 
registration procedures, an ad hoc committee of dele- 
gates from the Western Jurisdiction examined ways in 
which brutality and violence in the nation — high- 
lighted by the verdict in the Rodney King trial — could 
be addressed by members of the nation's second largest 
Protestant denomination. 

In its opening business session Tuesday, the General 
Conference voted to set aside time Wednesday morning 
to present a resolution. Under United Methodist law, 
the General Conference is the only body that can speak 
for the denomination, which counts about 10 million 
members in the United States, Puerto Rico, Africa, 
Europe, and the Philippines. 

The Council of Bishops a few days earlier addressed 
the issue of police brutality, violence, and justice in the 
judicial process. Two paragraphs from this statement 
were inserted in the Episcopal Address delivered Tues- 
day night by Bishop C. Dale White of the New York 
Area. 





Agenda 




Wednesday, May 6 


8:30 a.m. 


Worship 


9:00 a.m. 


Laity Address 


9:30 a.m. 


Election of Inter-Jiuisdictional 




Committee 


9:33 a.m. 


Elect John St. Church Trustees 


9:35 a.m. 


Simi-Valley Verdict 


12:20 p.m. 


Committee on Agenda 


12:25 p.m. 


Presiding Bishop Committee 


12:30 p.m. 


Plenary Acljoums 


2:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees meet 



"The vivid images of the beating of Rodney King, 
the acquittal of police officers, and subsequent rioting 
in Los Angeles remind us all too clearly of the fragile 
nature of justice and peace in our modem society," the 
bishops said. "Beneath the surface of our life together 
looms a seething violence that frightens us all. Radal 
prejudice, economic deprivation, moral disintegration, 
and spiritual confusion all enter the equation. 

"The United Methodist Church has repeatedly spo- 
ken against racism, economic greed, poverty, violence, 
and indifference to our neighbors. Images of brutality 
and violence remind the church that we must now in- 
tensify our efforts on behalf of justice and reconcili- 
ation." 

The traditionjil "state of the church" address deliv- 
ered by Bishop White also called on United Methodists 
to relinquish "liturgical laziness" and wake up to a re- 
newed movement of faith. "So great is [United Meth- 
odism's] spiritual power that as it awakens, the 
transforming spirit of Jesus Christ could radiate among 
the nations with a new brilliance." 

Meeting 200 years after the first Methodist General 
Conference was held in Baltimore, the 1992 General 
Conference opened with a fanfare of trumpets and 
drums and a procession of almost 100 bishops. FVeced- 
ing the bishops was a banner of the episcopal seal car- 
ried by the Rev. Andy Langford, head of the Board of 
Discipleship's Section on Worship. 

Bishop Judith Craig of the Michigan Area was litur- 
gist for the worship. Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel of the 
Washington Area, incoming president of the Council of 
Bishops, was celebrant for the eucharistic celebration. 

More than 75 clergy frota the Louisville Area as- 
sisted the bishops in serving the loaf and cup to dele- 
gates and visitors. 

Bishop Emilio deCarvalho of Angola in the homily 
ssdd that contemporary United Methodism faces clashes 
of culture, "emergence of a new cultural and ecclesiasti- 
cal imperialism," and a "new (holiness) movement that 
has managed to split United Methodists into 'evangeli- 
cals' versus 'more liberals.'" A m^or issue for the dele- 
gates in Louisville, he said, is how to unify the chvurch 
in the final decade of the twentieth century. Bishop de- 
Carvalho is outgoing president of the Council of Bish- 
ops. 

(continued page 74) 



74 



May 6. 1992 



What Happened to My Petition? 

That's the question some delegates are ask- 
ing after they find 12 pages of rationale for 
their petition have been deleted firom an Ad- 
vance Edition. 

Relax. You are not alone. Every petition is 
subject to editing by a cold-hearted editor. 

Rest assured, however, that the legislative 
committee will have your full petition in their 
hands as they consider your suggestions. The 
process of eliminating long rationales probably 
saved a tree or two and reduced the cost of Ad- 
vance Editions. 



Daily Christian 
Advocate 



Editorial Offices - Room 116 

Commonwealtli Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 

near Publishing House Display 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Sheila McGee Associate Editor & Newa/Featuree Manager 

Mike Cunningham Computer Manager/Calendar Editor 

and Co(u*dinator of Legislative Section Secretaries 

Rebecca Burgoyne Assistant Coordinator of Legislative 

Section Secretaries 
Gayl Hinton ... Composition Manager for Calendar and Proceedings 

Richard Street Composition Manager for News and Features 

Mochell Hughes Office Manager 

Bob Lowdermilk Coordinator of Verbatim 

Transcribers & Checkers 

BradMotta Features Editor 

Keith Kendall Roundup Editor 

Keith Pohl Coordinator of News Reports from Legislative 

Sections & News Editor 

George Dunn Manager of Audio Transcription 

Gilbert Elam Engineer 

Glenn Hinton Xywrite Trainer 

Thelma Boeder Index Editor 

Marvin Cropsey Chief Copy Editor 

Sally Sharpe Copy Editor 

Mary Catherine Dean Copy Editor 

Vern Bigler Copy Editor 

Janet C. Lowdermilk Copy Editor 

Vern Denney Copy Editor 

Gwen Colvin Copy Editor 

Angela Butler Copy Editor 

Rochelle Blake Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg Features Editor and Copy Editor 

Bob Lear News Writer 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Juanita Bellenfant Sales Manaager 

Marge Poteete Sales Representative 

Barbara Acuflf Sales Representative 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Tom Tozer News Writer 

Tom Potter News Writer 



(cover story cont) 

Delegates and visitors were welcomed into the ple- 
nary hall by almost 150 singers and instrujnentalists 
from First United Methodist Church in Dallas. Under 
the direction of Ronald KaufBcnan, the musicians pre- 
sented a varied program ranging from GabrieU and 
Beethoven to "When the Saints Go Marching In." 

Later in the afternoon the delegates found their as- 
signed legislative committees. There they elected offi- 
cers to guide their deliberations for the rest of this first 
week of General Conference. 



Robert Lear 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The Institute on Religion and Democracy will 
sponsor an issues forum for all delegates on "Why 
Resolutions Anyway?" on Wednesday, May 6 at 
12:45 in the Sampson Room, 1st floor. Gait House 
East. Speakers are John Stumbo and Diane Knip- 
pers. 

The Trustees and the President of Garrett-Evan- 
gelical Theological Seminaiy invite you and your 
guest to a dinner on Saturday, May 9, 5:45 p.m.. 
Second Floor Ballroom, Hyatt Regency. $12.50 per 
person, advance reservations only 

Bishop Bruce P. Blake of Dallas, Chairperson of 
the United Methodist Communications Coimcil of 
Texas and New Mexico, will host a reception for 
Ronald Patterson, the new publisher of The United 
Methodist Reporter, on Thursday from 5 to 6 p.m. 
in the Keeneland Suite on the Mezzanine Level of 
the Hyatt Regency Hotel. 

Sexual Harassment Briefing (Experiences, 
Policies, Legal Counsel, Monitoring), Thursday, 
May 7, 1 p.m., Collins Room, Gait House East. 

Yale Divinity School limcheon will be held Satur- 
day, May 9, 12:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. 
Dean Thomas W. Ogletree will be the speaker. For 
tickets ($15.00) see R, Randy Day, New York 
Delegation, Sea A, Row 6. All are welcome 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



75 



The video screen during the opening Communion 
service provided a fitting metaphor for the General 
Conference. Not only did the screen show the center 
aisle with delegates on both sides; it also showed the 
video screen, which repeated the image into infinity. 

Using the imagery of Bishop Emilio deCarvalho of 
the Western Angola Area, this General Conference is 
the body of Christ here and now in the struggle for 
church unity. And, as the body of Christ gathered in 
this place, the General Conference is built on the foun- 
dation which has already been laid, Jesus Christ. 



Many images blended into the Holy Communion 
celebration. Delegates stood as part of the vast chorus 
of persons gathered about the Lord's Table. People ex- 
tended hands in hospitality and greeting. Bishops 
streamed up and down the aisles during the proces- 
sional and offertory. More than a thousand voices were 
raised in many languages and accents to praise God 
and etSirm a common faith. Persons of many races and 
cultures united as one as they shared the bread and the 
cup. 



Opening 
Communion Service 



:^mm^ 



ik-JkLS 



Above: Over 1,000 voice* unite in praise to God to open 
the 1992 General Conference. 



Right: Ronald R. Kauffmann conduct* the chancel choir 
of Firrt United Methodist Church, Dallas, Texas. 



Below: Bishops Neil Irons, Cal MoConnell, James Ault, 
and William Lewis lead in singing the Dozol<^y after the 
offertory. 





(PHOTOS BY JOHN GOODWIN) 



76 



May 6, 1992 



Women Focus on Skills, Issues 



More than 400 women gathered for a Tuesday morn- 
ing orientation session cosiwnsored by the General 
Commission on the Status and Role of Women (COS- 
ROW) and the Women's Division, General Board of 
Global Ministries. 

"Women — Living Out Our Vision of an Inclusive 
Chui'ch" focused on skills development and issue aware- 
ness. Resource persons included the following lay dele- 
gates: Betty Admussen, Missouri West Conference; 
Augusta Carruth, South Georgia Conference; Women's 
Division president Sally Graham Ernst, Western Penn- 
sylvania Conference; Delia Escareno, Rio Grande Con- 
ference; Caroljm Johnson, North Indiana Conference; 
Women's Division vice president Thelma Johnson, West 
Ohio Conference (alternate); Connie Mitchell, Kentucky 
Conference; Eleanor Richardson, North Georgia Confer- 
ence; COSROW president Joetta Rinehart, Western 
North Carolina Conference; and Women's Division 
treasurer Connie Takamine, Rocky Mountain Confer- 
ence. 

Other leaders were the Rev. Minerva Carcano, dis- 
trict superintendent. New Mexico Conference; Dalila 
Cruz, executive secretary for leadership development. 
Women's Division; the Rev. Sandra Hoke, clergy dele- 



gate, Northern Illinois Conference; and the Rev. Bruce 
Robbins, general secretary. General Commission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. 

About 34.4 percent of the 1992 General Conference 
delegates are women, about 1 percent more than in 
1988. The number of clergywomen delegates rose 
sharply, while the number of lay women dropped. West- 
em Jurisdiction conferences elected the highest per- 
centage of women delegates — 47 percent. 

Barbara Campbell, an assistant general secretary 
with the Women's Division, said that — particularly 
with clergywomen delegates — "the growth in the past 
ten or twelve years is really astronomical." 

But Cecelia Long, general secretariat member, COS- 
ROW, noted that this year's women's delegation is not 
at the same percentage level as The United Methodist 
Church's approximately 60 percent women membership 
figures. 

"There is work to do to bring women into full and 
equal participation as delegates to the General Confer- 
ence," she said. 



-Linda Bloom and Barbara Dunlap-Berg 



Racial/Ethnic Delegate Orientation 



Reflecting on the Luke 4 accoimt of Jesus' visit to the 
temple in Nazareth, Barbara R. Thompson told 250 par- 
ticipants in Monday's racial ethnic delegate orientation 
to "remember when . . . Jesus takes up the scroll of 
Isaiah jmd declares that the prophecy is fulfilled. 

"Jesus chastises the Galilean synagogue officials: 'A 
prophet is without honor in his own hometown.' Jesus 
chides them further on their failvure to be in ministry to 
the whole country. 

"Remember," the General Commission on Religion 
and Race executive continued, how "Jesus walked un- 
harmed through the crowd and went on to continue his 
ministry. That was to be my promise of hope for the con- 
ference. 

"But so much changed this past Wednesday night," 
Thompson said. She returned home fi-om a trip, tvu*ned 
on the television, and was shocked to hear about the 
violence that followed the acquittal of four White Los 
Angeles police officers charged with brutality against 
Black motorist Rodney King. 

"I wondered what kind of response covdd be expected 
firom United Methodist leaders," she recalled. 

Sometimes when a rattlesnake changes its skin, 
Thompson said, it accidentally poisons itself. "General 
Conference is skin-changing time for The United Meth- 
odist Church. It's a time when any petition opens the 



church's belly to being poisoned by itself. By its own ir- 
rational actions," she continued, "[the chvu*ch] can deal 
death blows to important ministries. 

'Teriods of racial violence are skin-changing times 
for racial and ethnic minority people," she added. "We 
can become so paranoid about the 'rightness' or 'wrong- 
ness' of events that we become paralyzed by the poison 
we release on oiurselves. 

"We are gathered in solidarity because we believe 
our church and our society can be redeemed. We are 
gathered because we believe the walls that divide us 
are crumbling and in their place are stepping stones to 
community." 

Thompson challenged each delegate "to examine is- 
sues not only as a United Methodist elected by your an- 
nual conference but also as a person sensitive to the 
needs and ministries of racial and ethnic minority per- 
sons." 

During the General CouncU on Ministries-sponsored 
session, delegates reviewed key issues and divided into 
small groups to discuss petitions to be considered by leg- 
islative committees. 



-Barbara Dunlap-Berg and David WiUon 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



77 




Peraon* — and family — greeted delegate* and visitora at the Bishop'* Reception on Monday evening, May 4, 1992 at the Gait Hoiue 
Ea(t. PHOTO JOHN GOODWIN 



TV Coverage in Hotels 



Delegates and visitors need only turn on their hotel 
room televisions for an hour of United Methodist pro- 
gramming. This service begins on Thursday, May 7 and 
continues daily through Friday, May 15 (except Sun- 
day, May 10). This programming is being provided 
through the Visitel Network, a local hotel and conven- 
tion TV service. Visitel is available in more than 6,000 
rooms in 19 Louisville hotels. 

The program will include a one-minute General Con- 
ference news summary (repeated twice during the 
hour), produced for the Vision Interfaith Satellite Net- 
work (VISN). In addition, selected United Methodist 
programs such as "Catch the Spirit" and "Why We 
Care" will be shown. 

According to Visitel general manager Bill Rudy, the 
program will air at 7-8 a.m. and 9-10 p.m. over the fol- 
lowing channels: 

— Brown Hotel-Channel 8 

—Gait House/Gait House East-Channel 16 

— Holiday Inn Downtown-Channel 6 

—Hyatt-Channel 4 

— Seelbach-Channel 14 



Tent cards featuring Visitel information were dis- 
tributed at all 19 hotels on May 5. 

In addition, David Schraffenberger, general man- 
ager of the local Faith Channel, which carries VISN at 
designated times, said viewers can tune their TVs to 
Channel 19 (on Storer Cable Systems) at the following 
times for reguletr VISN programming: 

Monday — 10:30 a.m. -noon; 4-8 p.m. 

Tuesday— 1:30-2:30 p.m.; 4:30-6 p.m. 

Wednesday — 5-8 p.m. 

Thursday— 10-11 a.m.; 1-3 p.m.; 4:30-6 p.m. 

Friday— 4-5 p.m.; 7:30-9 p.m.; 10-11 p.m. 

Saturday — 10 p.m., continuing overnight until noon 
Sunday 

Two editions of "Jim Lawson Live," a one-hour 
weekly show produced by United Methodist Communi- 
cations for VISN, will originate firom the site of the 
General Conference, to air £rom 10-11 p.m. Friday eve- 
ning. May 8 flive) and Friday evening, May 15 (taped). 

VISN will broadcast nationwide one-minute daily re- 
ports from General Conference during station breaks at 
noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m., 9 p.m., and midnight. 



78 



May 6, 1992 



Getting Ready 




Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



79 





Upper right and clockwise: delegates at 
registration; DeWayne Woodring checks out 
conference floor arrangements; the first two 
delegates in their places - from the North Ala- 
bama Conference; an impromptu meeting in 
the hall; a final check on the voting system. 



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80 



May 6, 1992 



General Conference: Past And Present 



hy Dewayne S. Woodring 

Methodists love to observe ecclesiastical anniversa- 
ries. Indeed, I believe it's the only church alive that 
celebrates a bicentennial every few years. 

In 1966 we had a big recognition of the "planting of 
American Methodism."' Then in 1973 we recognized the 
200th anniversary of the first annual conference. When 
1980 rolled in, we commemorated the founding of the 
Sunday School. ..and in 1984 we celebrated the forma- 
tion of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Now we are coming into yet another anniversary. 
This time it's the 200th anniversary of General Confer- 
ence. This Methodist event has been held every quad- 
rennium since its inception in 1792. 

In those early days, without the aid of Federal Ex- 
press, fax machines, radio, TV, telephone, or Newscope, 
the call went out that a General Conference was to be 
held in Baltimore to determine the future direction of 
the church. 

The planning for the first General Conference was 
mostly done by two persons — Francis Asbury and 
Thomas Coke-— and their preparations were brief in 
nature. 

Today we have an entire Commission on the General 
Conference assigned the singular responsibility of plan- 
ning each General Conference, and it takes this body 
six years to accomplish all the tasks leading up to the 
quadrennial event. 

In 1792 the participants didn't have a choice in how 
they were going to get to Baltimore for the conference. 
They all went by horseback. They rode 40 to 60 miles a 
day through frost and snow, stayed wherever they could 
find lodging... in cabins, abandoned buildings, barns, or 
under the stars using saddlebags as pillows. 

One preacher wrote: "How glad should I be of a 
plain, clean plank to lie on, as preferable to most of the 
beds: and where the beds are in a bad state, the floors 
are worse." 

The concern of the pioneer preacher was whether or 
not the roads and trails would be passable and water 
fordable. 

Today we worry about how many planes and buses 
serve a city and the number of seats they provide per 
day. We are also concerned how to get some of our dele- 
gates out of countries which are presently experiencing 
political turmoil. 

Since it was unknown how many of the preachers 
would be able to make the trek to that early conference, 
advance preparations for lodging were undoubtedly 
minimal. Upon arriving in Baltimore, they somehow 
found places to stay, either in the homes of Methodist 
parishioners or in boarding houses. They also had to 
seek livei-y stables for the care of their horses. We now 
have to be concerned about parking spaces for horse- 
power of a different nature. 

The number that made the journey to this historic 
event was small. In fact, there will be more bishops sit- 
ting on the stage this spring in Louisville than there 




Dr. DeWayne S. Woodring 

BusinesB Manager of the Genera] Conference 

Executive director of the ConimisBion on the General Conference 

were participants in that original General Conference 
in Baltimore. 

We now have to be concerned about securing nearly 
2,000 hotel rooms for the delegates, staff, and visitors. 
And in the case of Louisville, we hope all the horse en- 
thusiasts, who have been here the previous weekend for 
the famous Kentucky Derby, will be checked out of 
their hotel rooms. 

The Light Street Church in Baltimore that held the 
first conference in 1792 was modest in size. However, it 
came complete with wooden benches; some even had 
backs. 

The 1992 General Conference will require a conven- 
tion center one block square, which will care for around 
6,000 persons. 

The Commonwealth Convention Center will be the 
site of the plenary sessions, legislative committees, sub- 
committees, and offices, and is located within a short 
walking distance of all the hotels with which we have 
commitments. This is an historic site for United Meth- 
odism, for in 1845 the Methodist Episcopal Chiu-ch, 
South, was organized in the old Fourth Street Method- 
ist Church, which stood at this exact location. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



81 



Those present at the first conference were all preach- 
ers. It was not until years later that the laity were to be 
involved. The voting at the 1992 General Conference 
will be done by 498 ministerial delegates. 

The furthest distance traveled by a delegate in 1792 
was 1,081 miles, which meant that he would have spent 
some 20 days on the trail to get to Baltimore. All the 
delegates were from the United States, with the possi- 
ble exception of one presiding elder from Nova Scotia. 

Two hundred years later, some 42 countries will be 
represented, and the furthest distance traveled by a 
delegate will be 11,204 air miles, which will be trav- 
ersed by jet plane in about a day. 

Many think of the early preachers as the "Fathers of 
the Church," but in reality the average age of those "fa- 
thers" was somewhere around 30. The average age of 
the '92 delegations will be a number of years above 
that. 

The early preacher arrived in town with just his 
horse and bags. The saddlebag was his suitcase, his pil- 
low, and his library. There were no advance notices in 
hand dealing with the issues to be discussed at the com- 
ing conference, for no one was really sure what was in 
store or if, indeed, because of the difficulties of travel, 
there would ever be another such conference. 

Our modern delegates will arrive, not only with mul- 
tiple suitcases in hand, but will have the Advance Edi- 
tions of the Daily Christian Advocate , which will weigh 
about four pwunds and contain many of the proposals 
and reports to be brought to the attention of the confer- 
ence. 

Just as in 1792 when historical precedents were set, 
so at the 1992 conference a number of "first" will be in 
evidence as modem technology is applied to the daily 
operations of this global assembly. 

For the first time the arriving delegates will receive 
a Volume II of the DCA... containing all the petitions 
from churches, individuals, and other United Methodist 
related organizations. In the past, these petitions had to 
be read aloud to the members of the legislative commit- 
tees. Generally, additional copies were not available. 

The petitions within the edition will be divided by 
the legislative committees to make them easily accessi- 
ble when deliberations take place. Again, it is antici- 
pated that this will speed discussion of the various 
petitions and enable the legislative committees to dis- 
patch their duties with greater efficiency. 

This year, as the floor debate takes place, it will be 
received by cable directly in the editorial ofilces of the 
DCA. Surrounded by electronic gear, the words from 
the plenary session will be immediately transcribed 
onto waiting computer screens, prepared for publica- 
tion, and whisked off to the printer. 

For the first time, computerization will also be the 
byword in the legislative committees through which 
will flow thousands of petitions from members, 
churches, and organizations of the denomination. 

In the past, laborious typing, retyping, and retyping 
again was the norm as reports were perfected by the 
committees prior to their being set in type for inclusion 
in the Daily Christian Advocate. 



In Louisville, arriving committee members will find 
a computer, already loaded with the petitions under 
consideration, ensconced in their meeting room. As the 
committee members perfect each item, the changes will 
be made directly in the computer and, when a docu- 
ment is finalized, it will be dispatched by disk to the 
DCA where it will automatically call forth the type re- 
quired for its publication in the next morning's edition. 

This new process will not only improve the speed by 
which items are handled, but it will assure greater ac- 
curacy over the previous system of redundant typing 
and setting of type in a print shop some distance from 
the conference site. 

In keeping with the changing times, the central fo- 
cus of the plenary hall will, for the first time, be ever- 
changing. Throughout past history of the church, a 
static, unchanging backdrop or stage setting has served 
as the focus of the plenary sessions. 

This time, a large video screen will be the focus of at- 
tention where a variety of images will greet the dele- 
gates as they enter the hall. In the morning, for 
instance, the portrayal will specifically relate to the 
sermon topic to be presented during the worship serv- 
ice. As people enter for the afternoon and evening ses- 
sions, a kaleidoscope of the chxu-ch at work throughout 
the world will be projected on the screen. 

Back by popular request at the '92 plenary sessions 
will be a state-of-the-art electronic voting system where 
every seat is wired for delegate response. 

In 1988, the United Methodist General Conference 
pioneered the use of electronic voting in the religious 
world. Representatives of other denominations viewing 
this system in action in St. Louis soon followed suit and 
began utilizing electronic voting at the general conven- 
tions. Among these are the Presbyterian Church (USA), 
the Church of the Nazarene, and the Evangelical Lu- 
theran Chiurch. 

The denominations found that this innovative voting 
system provides a speedier and more accurate tally of 
the votes cast on the issues before their conferences. 
Some feel it was because of the electronic system that 
the '88 United Methodist General Conference was able 
to close at an earlier hour than at any time dating back 
more than 20 years. 

As in the previous conference, a sophisticated optical 
projector will instantly display the results of the voting 
in colorful bar graphs on a large screen in the front of 
the plenary hall for all to see the results. 

Advances in the computer system will enable the 
delegates, for the first time, in addition to voting on mo- 
tions, to hold all elections through the use of the special 
key pads. Happily, this will mean: 

1) the elimination of the time-consuming tasks of 
marking and collecting nearly 1,000 ballots; 

2) Thirty delegate/tellers will not have to leave the 
plenary sessions to perform the arduous task of hand 
counting the ballots; 

3) There will be no delay in reporting the results of 
the tally. 

Modem electronics will also come into play as the 
words of translators are sent through the airwaves to 
those delegates requiring simultaneous translation, the 



82 



May 6, 1992 



behind-the-scenes staff will keep in touch by way of 
walkie-talkies, and those responsible for registration 
will utilize laser printers for the production of name 
badges. 

The cost of holding the initial conference in 1792 was 
negligible... a little more wood in the stove, which pro- 
vided the heat in the church, and some additional can- 
dles for the evening hours when there was no light 
through the arched windows. Each participant paid his 
own expenses. 

A few quill pens and a modicum of writing paper 
was all that was required to record the proceedings. 

One secretary probably took the minutes in 1792. 
This year we will have 33 secretaries and recorders and 
29 persons serving the Daily Christian Advocate. Count- 
ing the paper needs of this staff and the printing of the 
Daily Christian Advocate, in all we will use over 70 tons 
of paper. 

The budget for the 1992 General Conference is $3.1 
million. This covers the cost of the transportation of the 
official delegates, a per diem of $62 a day, the rental of 
meeting facilities, equipment and services, and the 
printing of the Daily Christian Advocate. However, the 
total amount expended will be much, much more since 
many of those in attendance have their expenses paid 
from other church funds or out of their own pockets. 

Taking the budgeted amount of money and applying 
it to just those hours when the delegates will be to- 
gether in worship, plenary sessions, or in legislative 
committees, the cost will be as least $36,904 an hour, or 
$615.08 a minute. 

The sound of the humam voice during the first confer- 
ence was carried in direct proportion to the lung power 
of the individual person. In the Commonwealth Conven- 
tion Center, we will use a large amplification system 
with 19 microphones and numerous speakers. 

There will also be another difference between the 
1792 conference and the one to be held in Louisville. 
Imagine if you will, 70 to 90 preachers who have just 
ridden in from days on horseback. They have slept in 



rough-hewn cabins, sometimes on the floor, or in the 
great outdoors wrapped in doe skins complete with 
fleas. Showers were not in vogue, and baths were infre- 
quent. Automatic washers and Right Guard had not 
been invented. 

Undoubtedly there was real ambiance in the air at 
that early church conference! 

Today, we have in the convention center huge air 
conditioners and ventilating fans. We also have roll-on, 
blow-on, and rub-on deodorants, plus Scope. 

In contrast to the small nmnber of persons involved 
in the first conference, attendance at the 1992 General 
Conference will average around 5,000 persons each day. 
It would be even larger if we still had the rule they did 
back in 1792. At that time, every preacher in full mem- 
bership was entitled to a seat in the General Confer- 
ence. That would mean today there would be 35,815 
preachers at the conference. And if we applied our cvu^- 
rent practice of a lay delegate for every clergy delegate, 
the delegates alone would number 73,630. Few facilities 
in the world could hold such an event! 

As was the practice in the early church, the 1992 ses- 
sion of the General Conference will officially open with 
Communion beginning at 1:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 5. 
Following will be days devoted to the business of the 
conference with the closing scheduled for Friday eve- 
ning. May 15. 

Within this time frame, the Book of the Discipline 
will be written, and you in the audience will be taking 
part in one of the longest conclaves of any religious or 
secular organization. 

Whether this General Conference with its electronic 
wizardry will be as effective in its decision-making as 
was that conference two centuries ago, with it's primi- 
tive, yet perfectly utilized resources, will depend upon 
you, the delegates. 

It is you, oxir elected representatives, who will set 
the law. ..the policies. ..the goals of international United 
Methodism for this day and age. 



Emergency Information 

The First Aid Room in the Convention Center is 
located off the North Lobby. It is open feach day from 
8:30 a.m. until closing in the evenings. The First Aid 
Room is staffed by a registered nurse and a qualified 
physician who are volunteers from Louisville United 
Methodist churches. After hours, persons with medi- 
cal needs may call Dr. C. Kenneth Peters, family 
physician, at 491-0809. For after-hour medical emer- 
gencies call 911 and ask for transportation to the 
Methodist Evangelical Hospital emergency room, lo- 
cated in the heart of the city near the hotels where 
delegates and visitors are housed. 



Phone Listings 




Business Manager/Director of Facilities 


588-4117 


Commission on Genereil Conference 


588-4117 


Daily Christian Advocate 


588-4325 


First Aid 


588-4381 




ext 239 


General Agencies 


588-4144 


Information/Message Center/Lost & Found 


588-4285 


Local Committee 


588-4318 


News Desk 


588-4890 


Radio News 


588-4896 


Secretary of General Conference 


588^345 


Treasurer's Office 


588-4369 


TV News 


588-4897 


First Aid (after hours) 


491-0809 



<l 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



83 



Oklahoma Choir To Lead Wednesday's Worship 



The Apache (Oklahoma) United Methodist Church 
choir will lead the 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. worship serv- 
ices today. The choir is under the direction of Penny J. 
Perry. 

The singers, all members of the church, represent 
several Native American tribes including Comanche, 
Apache, Kiowa, Seneca, Mescalero Apache, Choctaw, 
Fort Sill Apache, and Kiowa Apache. They have sung 
at the Granite Reformatory and for revivals and special 
services in churches across the Oklahoma Indian Mis- 
sionary Conference. The choir will present a concert at 
2 p.m. in the sanctuary of Trinity United Methodist 
Chvu-ch prior to the 2:30 worship hour. 

Preaching in the 8:30 a.m. service today will be 
Bishop Louis W. Schowengerdt of the Northwest 



Texas/New Mexico Area. Liturgists will be Dr. William 
Hutchinson of Albuquerque, NM, and the Rev. Jo Carr 
of Pampa, TX. The preacher in the 2:30 p.m. service 
will be Dr. Manfred W. Marquardt, dean of the United 
Methodist Theological Seminary in Reutlingen, West 
Germany. He will be assisted by liturgist Dr. Erika 
Welti of Zurich, Switzerland. 

Organist in today's services is Dan Stokes, director 
of music ministries at Christ Church United Methodist, 
Louisville. 




The choir of the United Methodist Church of Apache, Oldahoma. 



Announcement Guidelines 

PoUcjr: DCA announcements must refer to ofllcial business or program of the General Conference, or to mat- 
ters concerning conference delegates as they relate to recognized organizations and structures of The United 
Methodist Church. For example, announcements of the following can be included: delegation meetings, college or 
seminary breakfasts, general agency meetings, meetings of recognized caucuses, receptions or banquets honoring 
United Methodist official. We cannot run personal announcements or announcements sponsored by individuals. 

Announcement Deaiiline: To be published the next day, announcements must be brought to the DCA office 
on the lower level of the Convention Center, Room 116, before 3:00 p.m. Announcements must typed double- 
spaced or legible on special forms which are available in the DCA office. 



84 



May 6, 1992 



Council Of Bishops 



Report To The General Conference 1992 



Nominations for Election 



The General Council on Finance 
and Administration 

(Nominated by the Jurisdictional Colleges of Bish- 
ops and elected by the General Conference *905.1). 

North Central 

I.Ellen Brubaker 
2.Young S. Lee 
3.L. Kim Doverspike 
4. Evelyn Goodson 
S.Aretha Jones 
6. Jose Rosa 

Northeastern 

I.Noah Reed 
2. Eugene Matthews 
S.Sandra Kelley Lackore 
4. Shirley Parris 
S.Larry G. Johnson 
6.Tracey Merrick 

South Central 

l.Virgilio Vasquez-Garza 

2.Aaron Black 

S.Stan Sager 

4.H. Weldon Macke 

S.Nancy Carruth 

6.Marilynn Loyd , 

Southeastern 

I.Karen Collier 
2. Lawrence Dill 
S.Frank Furman 
4.Cashar Evans 
S.Mary Ellen Bullard 
e.Martha W. Gerald 

Western 

l.Edsel White 
2.David Orendorf 
S.Raul Alegria 
4.RogerKruse 
S.Sally Brown Geis 
G.Eunice Sato 

At-large 

(Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected 
by the General Conference ''90S.1) 

1. William White Wisconsin NC 

2. Zedna Haverstock Central PA NE 

3. Barbara Schaffer Alaska MissionaryW 



4. Lenora Thompson Ford E PA 



NE 



s. 


Henning Bjerno 


N. Europe 


CC 


6. 


Joseph Heyward 


S Carolina 


SE 


7. 


Elsie Crickard 


KS West 


SC 


8. 


Lee Sheaffer 


Virginia 


SE 


9. 


Chad Anglemeyer 








(under age 30) 


KS West 


SC 


10. 


Amy Valdez 








(under age 18) 


Iowa 


NC 



General Board of Pensions 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected by 
the General Conference (not more than two from the 
same jurisdiction, *1602.1a 







Jurisdiction 


1. 


Kay Alburj'-Smith 


NE 


2. 


Cindy Garn 


NC 


S. 


Dight Grain 


NE 


4. 


Quillian Yancey 


SE 


5. 


Anne Chin 


W 


6. 


Nancy McMillan 


SC 




General Commission 




on Archives and History 


Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected by 


5 General Conference (*1804). 








Jurisdiction 


1. 


Sue Alexander 


NE 


2. 


Janet Engle 


W 


3. 


Al Wineberger 


SE 


4. 


Kim Vaughn 


NC 


S. 


Marie Copher 


SE 


6. 


Artemio Guillermo 


NC 


7. 


Maynard Brichford 


NC 


8. 


Pam Lineberger 


SE 


9. 


Robert Monk 


SC 


10. 


John Sims 


NC 


11. 


Jim Beal 


SC 


12. 


Ralph Blanks 


NE 


13. 


Robert Rosas 


W 



Judicial Council 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected by 
the General Conference (*2601) 

Jurisdiction 

1. Don Lefeler NC 

2. Glenda C. Thomas W 
S. Susan Henry Crowe SE 

4. Joyce Alford NC 

5. Richard Wright NE 

6. Robert Sweet NE 



i\ 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



85 



7. 


Zan Holmes 


SC 


8. 


Thee Schaad (Switz) 


CC 


9. 


James Kambor (Liberia) 


CC 


10. 


James M. Dolliver 


W 




(to retire after four ; 


years) 


11. 


Williard H. Douglas, Jr. 


SE 


12. 


Elizabeth B. Gundlach 


NE 


13. 


Wesley Bailey 


SE 


14. 


Clenzo Fox 


NC 


15. 


Crisolito Pascual 


CC 



Secretary-designate of The General 
Conference 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected by 
the General Conference (*604) 

1. Carolyn Marshall NC 

Episcopal Members of The General 
Commission on Archives and History 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops, elected by the 
General Conference ("1804.2). 

Jurisdiction 

1. New Bishop NE 

2. New Bishop SC 

Episcopal Members of The 
General Board of Church And Society 

Nominated by theCouncil of Bishops, elected by the 
General Conference (*805.2b). 







Jurisdiction 


1. 


Roy I. Sano 


W 


2. 


Joseph H. Yeakel 


NE 


3. 


New Bishop 


NC 


4. 


Arthur Kulah 


CC 


5. 


Ruediger R. Minor 


CC 


6. 


New Bishop 


SE 


7. 


New Bishop 


SC 



Episcopal Members of The General 
Board of Discipleship 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops, elected by the 
General Conference (''805.2b). 

Jurisdiction 

1. David J. Lawson NC 

2. Robert C. Morgan SE 

3. Walter Klaiber CC 

4. Thomas B. Stockton SE 

5. Richard B. Wilke SC 

6. Elias G. Galvan W 

7. J. Alfred Ndoricimpa CC 

8. Sharon Brown ChristopherNC 

9. New Bishop NE 

10. Bruce P. Blake SC 
Elected by the Council of Bishops ("1204.1): 
Ngoy Wakadilo CC 

Episcopal Members of The General 
Board of Global Ministries: 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops, elected by the 
General Conference (»805.2b). 







Jurisdiction 


1. 


C.P. Minnick, Jr. 


SE 


2. 


Dan E. Solomon 


SC 


3. 


F. Herbert Skeete 


NE 


4. 


J. Lloyd Knox 


SE 


5. 


Felton E. May 


NE 


6. 


Moises Fernandes 


CC 


7. 


New Bishop 


NC 


8. 


New Bishop 


W 


9. 


New Bishop 


CC - Philippines 


10. 


New Bishop 


SC 



Elected by the Council of Bishops from the Central 
Conferences("1412.6): 

1. Jose C. Gamboa, Jr. 

2. Kainda Katembo 

3. Heinrich Bolleter 

Episcopal Members of The General 

Board of Higher Education 

and Ministry 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops, elected by the 
General Conference ("805.2b). 

Jurisdiction 



1. 


Calvin D. McConnell 


W 


2. 


William B. Lewis 


NC 


3. 


H. Hasbrouck Hughes 


Jr.SE 


4. 


William B. Oden 


SC 


5. 


Emerito P. Nacpil 


CC 


6. 


Sheldon Duecker 


NC 


7. 


Neil Irons 


NE 


8. 


New Bishop 


SE 


9. 


New Bishop 


CC (Zimbabwe) 


10. 


New Bishop 


CC 



(Sierra Lieone)Elected by the Coimcil of Bishops 
("1507).: Joao S. Machado CC 

Episcopal Members of The General 

Council on Finance and 

Administration: 

Nominated by the Council of Bishops and elected by 
the General Conference ("905 .4c). 

Jurisdiction 

NC 

NE 

SEElected to the 

Richard C. 



1. Edwin C. Boulton 

2. Forrest C. Stith 

3. Richard C. Looney 
Committee on Official Forms and Records 
Looney (•905.4c). 



University Senate 

(Council of Bishops to nominate twelve for (General 
Conference to elect four "1517.2).Chief Executive Offi- 



cers: 







Jurisdiction 


1. 


Ken Pye 


SC 


2. 


Julius Scott, Jr. 


SC 


3. 


F.Tom Trotter 


W 


4. 


Robert Bottoms 


NC 


5. 


Joab Lesesne 


SE 


6. 


Thomas C. Courtice 


NE 



86 



May 6, 1992 



Holding other positions: 



7. 


Maijorie Suchocki 


W 


8. 


Douglas Meeks 


NE 


9. 


Wayne Ciunmings 


SE 


10. 


Sandra Lutz 


NC 


11. 


John Q.T. King 


SC 


12. 


Carolyn Johnson 


NC 



Appointments for Information 
Onlyuniversity Senate 

(Council of Bishops to appoint four, two of whom 
shall be chief executive officers of United Methodist-re- 
lated educational institutions, and two holding other 
positions relevant to academic or financial affairs or 
church relationships. *1517.2)J 
Jurisdiction 

1. Don Messer (Chief Exec) W 

2. Gloria Scott (Chief Exec.)) SE 

3. Vivian Bull NE 

4. Joseph Taylor NC 



Commission on The General 
Conference Class of 2000 



1. 


Robert Brandt 


NE 


2. 


Carole Cotton-Winn 


SC 


3. 


Mollie Stewart 


SE 


4. 


Kimball Salmon 


W 


5. 


Harry Shaner 


W 


6. 


Maximo Dizon 


CC (Middle Phil) 



Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order 



1. 


Richard Hamilton 


NC 


2. 


Harvey Manchester 


NE 


3. 


Marvin McReynolds 


SC 


4. 


Jerry Bray 


SE 


5. 


Robert Stevens 


W 


6. 


David Quee 


CC 


7. 


Edna Williams 


At-large 


8. 


Carmen Carrico 


At-large 


9. 


Sandra Dufi-esne 


At-large 


10. 


Phylemon Titus 


At-large 



Legislative Committee Officers 



Central Conference 

Chair: Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil; Vice Chair: Bishop 
Ruediger R. Minor, Secretary: Sharon Rader. 

Church And Society 

Chair: James M. Lawson Jr., California-Pacific; Vice 
Chair: Thalia F. Matherson, North Texas; Secretary: 
Don M. Pike, Central Texas. 

Conferences 

Chair: Vance Summers Jr., West Ohio; Vice Chair: 
Fritz Mutti, Missouri West; Secretary: Susan D. Messen- 
ger, North Indiana. 

Discipleship 

Chair: C. Rex Bevins, Nebraska; Vice Chair: Ann B. 
Sherer, Texas; Secretary: J. LaVon Wilson, Central Illi- 
nois. 

Financial Administration 

Chair: Sandra L. Kelley Lackore, Southern New 
England; Vice Chair: Ewing Werlein Jr., Texas; Secre- 
tary: Velma Bunch, Tennessee. 

Faith And Mission 

Chair: Charlene P. Kammerer, Florida; Vice Chair: 
James A. Harnish, Florida; Secretary: Ronald Y. Koo, 
North Texas. 



General And Judicial Administration 

Chair: Walter Kimbrough, North Georgia; Vice 
Chair: Carolyn Johnson, North Indiana; Secretary: 
David Severe, Oklahoma. 

Global Ministries 

Chair: Twick Morrison, Mississippi; Vice Chair: Paul 
Alegria, California-Nevada; Secretary: Connie Mitchell, 
Kentucky. 

Higher Education And Chaplaincy 

Chair: Janet E. Stephenson, Iowa; Vice Chair: Alfred 
L. Norris, Louisiana; Secretary: Sam Wynn, North 
Carolina. 

Independent Commissions 

Chair: Gilbert H. Caldwell, Eastern Pennsylvania; 
Vice Chair: Becky Haase, California Pacific; Secretary: 
Edna L. Williams, Alabama- West Florida. 

Local Church 

Chair: Janice Riggle Huie, Southwest Texas; Vice 
Chair: Roy Stephenson, Memphis; Secretary: Bradley 
Watkins, Central Illinois. 

Ordained And Diaconal Ministry 

Chair: Dennis M. Campbell, North Carolina; Vice 
Chair: Rosa Washington, California-Nevada; Secretary: 
Mary Elizabeth Moore, California-Pacific. 



i 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



87 



Standing Commission 
on Alcohol and Drugs 

Petition Number IC-12434-3000-R$; Howard Lydick 
First United Methodist Church, Richardson, Texas 

In order to make more effectual the efforts of the 
United Methodist Church in creating a Christian public 
sentiment and in crystallizing opposition to aU public 
violations of the moral law, and especially to oppose the 
many evils existing in society caused by the consumption 
of alcoholic beverages and other drugs, there shall be a 
Standing General Commission on Alcohol and 
Drugs, hereinafter known as the Commission. 

Its headquarters shall be in Washington, D.C. 

PURPOSE: 

The object and duty of the Commission shall be to 
promote by an intensive educational program voluntaiy 
total abstinence from all intoxicants and narcotics; the 
educational program to include the use of radio, 
television, publication and distribution of literature; to 
promote observance and enforcement of constitutional 
provisions and statutory enactments which suppress the 
traffic in alcoholic beverages and in narcotic drugs; and to 
promote the speedy enactment of such legislation 
throughout the world. 

INCORPORATION: 

The Commission shall be incorporated in the District 
of Columbia. The Commission shall be the legal successor 
and successor in trust of the corporations, boards, depart- 
ments or entities known as the Department of Himian 
Welfare of the General Board of Church and Society of 
the United Methodist Church; the Division of General 
Welfare of the General Board of Church and Society of 
the United Methodist Chiu-ch; the Division of General 
Welfare of the General Board of Christian Social Con- 
cerns of the United Methodist Church; the Department of 
Christian Social Action of the Evangelical United 
Brethren Church; the Division of Alcohol Problems and 
General Welfare of the General Board of Christian Sociid 
Concerns of the Methodist Church; the Division of 
Temperance and General Welfare of the General Board of 
Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church; the 
Board of Temperance of the Methodist Church; and the 
Board of Temperance, Prohibition and Public Morals of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

MEMBERSHIP: 

The Commission shall consist of thirty persons elected 
by the Jurisdictional Conferences and three Bishops 
elected by the Council of Bishops. Those elected to the 
Commission shall be chosen solely for their demonstrated 
concern about the problems caused in our society by the 
presence and use of alcoholic beverages and other drugs. 
Each Jurisdiction shall elect six persons from the list of 
persons proposed for General Agency membership by the 
Annual Conferences. A Jurisdiction may elect a maximum 
of four clergy members or four lay members. At the first 
meeting of each quadrennium and each annual meeting 
thereafter, the Commission may elect an additional per- 
son or persons based on special expertise which will be of 
assistance to the Commission provided that a maximum 
of five such persons may be elected each quadrennium. 

VACANCIES in the Commission membership shall be 
filled by the procedure defined in para. 812 of the General 
Provisions. 

OFFICERS: 



The officers of the Commission shaU be a President, a 
Vice President, a Secretary and a Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

The Commission shaU have an Executive Committee 
composed of the elected officers and two additional per- 
sons selected by the Commission from among its other 
members. The Genered Secretary shall be a member of 
the Executive Committee with a voice but not the right to 
vote. The Conunittee shall have the power ad interim to 
fill {my vacancies occurring in the elected staff and to 
transact such business and adopt such resolutions and 
statements as are authorized between the meetings of the 
Commission. It shidl report all of its actions to the Com- 
mission promptly after each of its meetings and again for 
confirmation at the next meeting of the Commission. 

MEETINGS: 

The Commission shall hold an annual meeting at a 
time and place to be determined by its executive commit- 
tee, and such other meetings as its work may require, and 
shall enact suitable bylaws governing the activities of the 
Commission and its employees. A m^ority of the member- 
ship shall constitute a quorum. 

STAFF.- 

The Commission shall have a General Secretary and 
one or more Associate General Secretaries as its work 
may show to be necessary. The commission shall be other- 
wise organized and operate according to the general 
provisions of the Administrative Order of the Discipline 
except where they may be in conflict with the provisions 
herein adopted specifically for the Commission. 

FUNDING: 

The Standing Commission shaU be funded like other 
general agencies of the church (para. 906 of the Dis- 
cipline). During its first quadrennium (1992-1996) it shall 
receive from the funds otherwise authorized for the use of 
the General Board of Church and Society that percentage 
which corresponds to the amount authorized for the use 
of the Boiu-d of Temperance during the last quadrennium 
(1956-60) that the former Boards of Temperance, World 
Peace and Social & Economic Relations received in- 
dividual appropriations. It shall receive aU property 
owned or controlled by the former Board of Temperance 
at the time of its merger, in 1960, with the former Boards 
of World Peace and Social & Economic Relations. 

The Commission shall be authorized to solicit and cre- 
ate special funds; to receive gifts and bequests; to hold 
properties and securities in trust; and to administer all 
these financial affidrs in accordance with its own rules 
and the provisions of the Discipline. 

ANNUAL CONFERENCE: 

Each Annual Conference shall establish a Commission 
on Alcohol and Drugs. The total membership of this Com- 
mission shall be determined by each Annusd Conference 
according to its own rules. Each member of the Standing 
General Commission on Alcohol and Drugs shall be an ex 
oflicio member, with vote, of the Annual Conference 
where that member resides or has their Annual Con- 
ference membership. Clergy appointed beyond the local 
church may, if they chose, be a member of the Commis- 
sion of the Annual Conference where they reside. 

LOCAL CHURCH: 

Each local church shall have a work area for Alcohol 
and Drugs. 

EFFECTIVE DATE: 

This legislation shall become effective on October 1, 
1992. 



88 



May 6, 1992 



THE EPISCOPAL ADDRESS 
1992 General Conference 



Bishop C. Dale White 



We gather once again in General Conference, hun- 
dreds of lay and clergy called of God to give leadership 
to the Church of Jesus Christ. We come from all over 
the world, speaking many languages. We represent a 
world-wide company of disciples millions strong. We 
come trusting that the Holy Spirit will guide us and in- 
spire us to lead the Church with pastoral sensitivity 
and prophetic vision. 

As we gather, we remember the words of Luke the 
physician, who described the life of the first Christian 
congregation in Jerusalem, in Acts 2:42-47 (NRSV): 

"They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching 
and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the 
prayers. Awe came upon everyone, because many won- 
ders and signs were being done through the apostles. 
All who believed were together and had all things in 
common; they would sell their possessions and goods 
and distribute the proceeds to all, as any had need. 
And day by day, as they spent much time together in 
the temple, they broke bread at home and ate their food 
with glad and generous hearts, praising God and hav- 
ing the goodwill of all the people. And day by day the 
Lord added to their number those who were being 
saved." 

Let us pray that all that we do and say here may 
bear the fruits of the Spirit in the thousands of congre- 
gations which we represent. 0, God, may the memory 
of that first Christian congregation, its deep spiritual- 
ity, its overwhelming generosity, its warm and welcom- 
ing fellowship, be the vision which shapes our life 
together, here and wherever the people called Method- 
ist reside. Amen. 

Since we last gathered four years ago, a number of 
our colleagues in the Council of Bishops have stepped 
out of our midst into the Church Eternal. Though sepa- 
rated from our immediate presence, these faithful min- 
isters of Jesus Christ are still bound to us all in warm 
bonds of love and comimon purpose which mark the 
commimion of saints: 

1988 

Fred G. Holloway (6-1-88) 
W. Ralph Ward (6-28-88) 
Pedro R. Zottele (8-24-88) 
Hazen G. Werner (9-15-88) 
W. McFerrin Stowe (11-24-88) 
Cornelio Ferrer (11-23-88) 
d989 

T. Otto Nail (2-21-89) 
Paul A. Washburn (5-6-88) 
W. Kenneth Pope (6-26-89) 
John Wesley Lord (6-26-89) 



1990 

James W. Henley (6-7-90) 
Friedrich Wunderlich (7-9-90) 
Paul V. Galloway (84-90) 

1991 

Sante Uberto Barbieri (2-13-91) 

W. Kenneth Goodson (9-17-91) 

1992 

Francis E. Kearns (1-29-92) 



In silence let us remember these visionary leaders 
and take courage. 

In this time together the bishops of the Church wish 
to share with you vital concerns which have captured 
our attention over these past months. Responding to 
the call of the Church for the Council of Bishops to offer 
vigorous leadership to the people of God, we have 
sought to lead the Church through three episcopal in- 
itiatives. In each case, the response of the Church has 
been magnificent. Leading laity of hundreds of congre- 
gations, pastors, diaconal ministers, persons of special- 
ized competence, seminary and university faculties, all 
have shared their perspectives and their recommenda- 
tions. Directors and staff of all the Boards and Agen- 
cies of the (jeneral Church have responded with 
enthusiasm. Their resources of staff time, printed and 
audio-visual materials, research facilities and finances 
have been invested willingly. 

The first episcopal initiative addressed the nuclear 
crisis as the bishops wrote In Defense of Creation. 

In this quadrenniimi we challenged the Chvu-ch to 
respond to the crisis of Substance Abuse and Violence, 
and to explore our missional readiness with a study of 
Vital Congregations - Faithful Disciples. 

We invite you now to reflect with us on our learn- 
ings from these initiatives. Where will the Spirit now 
lead us as we seek to serve this present age? 

I. Vital Congregations - Faithful 
Disciples 

After intensive study and prayerful reflection, the 
bishops led the Church in Vital Congregations - Faith- 
ful Disciples. The bishops invited the Church to enter 
into a time of discernment, of searching self-examina- 
tion, of listening intently for the word of (Jrod for the 
new age now dawning. 

In a pastoral letter, we the bishops declared our own 
commitments: . 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



89 



. to fast and pray on behalf of congregational vitality 
and faithful discipleship; 

. to lead our annual conferences in discerning God's 
vision for the church and congregational life; 

. to evaluate o\ir styles of episcopal leadership as 
they affect congregational life and the mission of the 
connection; 

. to seek to nurture the life of existing congregations 
and to encourage the establishment of new ones; 

. to preach the Word and celebrate Holy Communion 
regularly in local congregations. 

To the Chiurch, and now again to this General Con- 
ference we bring this charge: "We plead with you to 
join us in our yearning, in our fasting, in our praying, 
in our study and in our work on behalf of vital congre- 
gations and faithful disciples, and in commending Je- 
sus Christ as Lord and Savior of the world." 

The United Methodist Church has been compared to 
a giant who has been lulled to sleep. So great is its 
spiritual power that as it awakens, the transforming 
spirit of Jesus Christ could radiate among the nations 
with a new brilliance. 

Our word to our congregations is therefore: Wake 
up! Be alert! Pray more earnestly, ponder the Scrip- 
tures more thoughtfully, set upon your journey into 
mission with a renewed vitality! 

1. From Paralysis to Movement 

We challenge our people to come awake for the jour- 
ney from paralysis to movement, "enlivening our mis- 
sion in Christ's name. Methodism began as an 
evangelical renewal movement among the laity, cen- 
tered on the personal reality of God, holiness of living, 
and active love for the poor and distressed. The dyna- 
mism of that movement is available today." 

What can we identify as paralyzing influences upon 
our congregations? Those forces bedevil us, even in the 
best of times. The late Bishop Gerald Kennedy used to 
thunder: "Ten million Methodists! Where is the power 
loss?" Surely the power is lost, not through some mas- 
sive power outage; the power of the Holy Spirit floods 
our very being. The power is lost through myriads of 
small leaks, as the vision and the courage to minister 
with joyous enthusiasm are bled from us. Where is the 
power loss? Each of us might make a list of insidious 
power leakages. Such a list might include: 

• Demoralization. Many of us are members of cul- 
tures which reward bigness and define excellence in nu- 
merical terms. In contrast: we are a denomination of 
small-membership congregations. Many of these con- 
gregations are demoralized by a sense of second-class 
citizenship. We confess that as a denomination we 
have too often added to the demoralization of small 
membership congregations by depriving them of skilled 



leadership or burdening them with unnecessary struc- 
ture. 

We confess that the Methodist vision of a connec- 
tional church has often been dulled by provincial atti- 
tudes. It is time to draw upon our long experience with 
cooperative ministries and cooperative parishes. Mod- 
els developed during times of our dynamic growth need 
to be rediscovered. We are weak only as we fail to work 
together. We are strong as we share resources and 
unite o»ir strength in mission. 

♦ Rigidity in the face of change. In a fast-chang- 
ing world, congregations which are not adaptable lose 
vitality. Emerging opportunities for ministry are over- 
looked. New populations of singles or unchurched chil- 
dren or the elderly or racial-ethnic people surround our 
congregations. We confess that a sense of powerless- 
ness often blocks our outreach. Chm-ches fail to grow 
when entrenched leaders refuse to share power with 
new talent. Churches fail to grow when fear of losing 
an intimate family feeling causes the people to reject 
new-comers. 

Nowhere is resistance to change more evident than 
in the worship life of so many of our congregations. 
One suspects that in many places people hesitate to in- 
vite others to church because they know nothing inspir- 
ing is likely to happen there. Liturgical laziness is a 
curse of the Church. Matthew Fox has said, "To invite 
people to church and put them to sleep is a sin." 

We are grateful that signs of spiritual awakening 
aboimd among us: 

* Innovative forms of vital worship are emerging in 
thousands of congregations. 

* Our people sing the praises of God under the guid- 
ance of a superb new United Methodist Hymnal We 
look forward to a new Book of Worship. 

* Covenant discipleship groups, modem Wesleyan 
Class Meetings are being revived, as the United Meth- 
odist people share in the pastoral care ministry of all 
Christians. 

* Pastors are being trained in spiritual formation in 
seminaries and Annual Conference programs. 

* Spiritual life retreats and Walk to Emmaus are a 
growing source of spiritual formation and sustenance 
for many. In one region, leaders of Roman Catholic re- 
treat centers express amazement that United Method- 
ists are their major clients. 

* The Upper Room is an inspiration to hundreds of 
thousands of people in many countries. Our General 
Boards and Agencies bless the Church with a remark- 
able array of sacred literature and attractive resources 
for the study of the faith. 

Resistance to change is a paralyzing reality among 
us. Yet we know that openness to change must never 
lead us to cultural conformity. The cultural captivity of 
the Church is a danger in every place and in every age. 



90 



May 6, 1992 



Innovation must never be equated with shallow fad- 
dishness. Preaching a relevant faith is not the same as 
preaching cheap grace. We need an unusual capacity 
for discernment to tell the difference. 

* Internal power struggles. How often we war 
against our own members. We confess that we some- 
times search out ways to discredit our own boards and 
agencies, carefully nurturing any signs of weakness. 
Some among us seem bent at times upon alienating our 
members from the unified mission of the Church. In 
the end, our members become confused, their efforts 
weakened. 

We must claim our unity in Christ! We need to fo- 
cus oiu- mission resources on projects which are ac- 
countable to the Church and which reflect our holistic 
Wesleyan theology. 

The General Conference of 1988 released to the 
Church a superb statement of ovir biblical theology. We 
have barely begun to actualize its meaning. The 
charge is often heard that United Methodists have no 
clear theology. That is simply not true! Within the 
boundaries of our holistic Wesleyan theology, different 
persons will naturally cherish different priorities. Our 
rich diversity should be celebrated, our unity in Christ 
claimed. Uncharitable attitudes toward those who dif- 
fer from us are unworthy of us. We must never allow 
mean-spirited and polarizing discourse to sap ovu- ener- 
gies or paralyze our ministries. We need to recall the 
Word: "The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, pa- 
tience, blindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, 
and self-control." (Gal. 5:22, NRSV) 

♦ Fear of Controversy. How often we hear the 
cry: "We will split the church if we deal with this is- 
sue!" We confess our fear that any serious debate of 
controversial issues will reveal how fragile is our unity. 
We should remember that issues are controversial be- 
cause they matter to people. They matter because they 
challenge vital interests and force a new look at basic 
values. Open dialogue on sensitive issues allows us to 
discern the leading of the Holy Spirit. Ovu- people find 
the guidance they seek. Struggling together to find an- 
swers to perplexing problems may be painful, but it can 
also be invigorating! 

This General Conference will lead the Church in 
the examination of a number of crucial issues. One of 
the most controversial will be the report of the Commis- 
sion to Study Homosexuality. Whatever our final deci- 
sion upon the recommendations of that Commission, we 
pray that we might model here for the whole Church 
the matiu-e capacity to examine such sensitive matters 
with good grace and an open spirit. May we all pray for 
the ability to discern the leading of the Holy Spirit. 
May we in this as in all things claim our unity in 
Christ even as we rejoice in our diversity. As we search 
together for the Word of God on such vital matters, let 
us remember I Cor.:13; let all things be done in love. 

The Church has been a reforming and renewing 
presence in all of our societies precisely because it has 
the courage to seek and to declare the new directions in 
which the Spirit is leading the people of God. Our pro- 



phetic calling to seek new truth depends upon our will- 
ingness to risk honest debate. 

* Racism, sexism, tribalism, classism. We have 
long known that racism, sexism, tribalism, and clas- 
sism in all their forms are a paralyzing influence 
among us. They compromise ovir witness, deprive the 
Church of the gifts of many, and drive some away from 
us. For years we have read the scriptures: "There is no 
longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, 
there is no longer male and female; for all of you are 
one in Christ Jesus." (Gal. 3:28, NRSV). Yet we confess 
that blatantly open acts of bigotry occur even among 
us. Institutionalized forms of discrimination are often 
overlooked or ignored in both Church and society. 

Let us renew the mandate which the 1988 General 
Conference gave us: all annual conferences, local 
churches, seminaries, general agencies, institutions, 
and the Council of Bishops should make the elimina- 
tion of racism a priority in all their agendas! It is time 
now for us to redouble our efforts to create just policies 
which witness that every human being is beloved of 
God regardless of race, class, sex, national, or ethnic 
origin. 

* Let us repent of our complicity either consciously 
or unconsciously in systems of bigotry and discrimina- 
tion. 

* Let every person here make a renewed commit- 
ment to courageous witness and action. 

* Let us continue our efforts to hasten the demise of 
the apartheid system in South Afi^ca. Methodist peo- 
ple have been influential in the sanctions movement. 
The World Methodist Council is giving prophetic lead- 
ership. The resurgence of ancient ethnic hatreds in 
many lands is a disturbing development. The new 
apartheid system which has been built to oppress and 
exploit the Palestinian people in the Occupied Territo- 
ries must be forcefully condemned. 

* Let us use the occasion of the 500th anniversary of 
the Evu"opean expansion into the Americas for confes- 
sion and reparation for the brutal exploitation and 
genocide of indigenous peoples. May this anniversary 
be a time of new beginnings. 

As a Mayan leader said recently: "How can we cele- 
brate, when with the coming of Columbus, the flower of 
our life died." Indigenous people in many lands need 
our support in the struggle for justice. 

* We recall with sorrow that half the world's people, 
women and gfrls, continue to experience discrimination 
and violence because of their gender. Let us add the 
strength of our voices in support of the ratification of 
the U.N. Convention to Eliminate Discrimination 
Against Women. Let us condemn in the strongest pos- 
sible way the sexual harrassment of women wherever it 
occvirs. 

As we look around the Church, we know "we have 
this treasure in earthen vessels", yet the treasiu-e glows 



( 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



91 



from within. We confess our paralysis. We accept the 
absolution of a gracious God. We rejoice in every sign 
that we are emerging as a dynamic spiritual movement 
today, an open and hospitable church: 

* Relational evangelism is a way of life for many 
thousands of congregations. The Holy Spirit leads 
many to Christ through vital worship, invitational 
preaching and personal witness. A warm spirit of Koi- 
nonia radiates into the communities, and "day by day 
the Lord adds to our number those who are being 
saved." 

* We are a Pentecost Church, a meeting place for 
many nationalities of people. New immigrant commu- 
nities are blessed with ovu- right hand of fellowship. 
Multi-ethnic congregations bear testimony to the new 
age of reconciled peoples God is creating in the world. 
The Ethnic Minority Local Church program and the 
emerging strategies for Hispanic Ministries reveal our 
commitment to inclusive evangelism. The Commis- 
sions on Religion and Race and the Status and Role of 
Women assist us in monitoring our activities. 

* We are open to our brothers and sisters in other de- 
nominations and faiths. We continue a long tradition of 
ecumenical leadership through councils of churches at 
all levels, and through grass-roots cooperative minis- 
tries. Our ecimienical commitment is written into our 
Constitution: "As part of the Church Universal, the 
United Methodist Church believes that the Lord of the 
Church is calling Christians everywhere to strive to- 
ward unity; and therefore it will seek, and work for, 
unity at all levels of church life." We have signaled our 
intention to continue a vigorous involvement in the 
COCU process: "We celebrate God's call to the concept 
of covenant relationship expressed in Churches in Cove- 
nant Communion as an expression of Christian unity 
that is organic and spiritual rather than organizational 
and institutional". While the Council of Bishops is rec- 
ommending delay on the vote on covenanting until 
1996, yet "we long for the day when the covenant may 
be realized among us, and acknowledge with joy our 
eagerness to enter into covenant." Let no voices among 
us dampen our historic eagerness for Christian unity. 

* Mission evangelism is a growing commitment. Co- 
ordinated through the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries the whole Church is making extraordinary efforts 
to reach into areas where the Gospel has not been 
heard or has long been silenced. We appreciate the 
eagerness of our people to assist the churches in East- 
em Europe and the former Soviet Union as they claim 
their new freedom to witness to the living Christ. The 
Council of Bishops has released Bishop Ruediger Minor 
to give full-time leadership to this effort. The growing 
churches of Africa and Asia reveal an awakening 
church. We are overcoming our paralysis and moving 
into the world with renewed energy. The Great Com- 
mission guides us: "Go therefore and make disciples of 
all nations...." (Matt. 28:18) 



2. From Numbness to Creativity 

We call the Church to come awake for the journey 
from numbness to creativity, "as we become a sign to 
the world that God is alive and God's promise is real. 
The Holy Spirit is blowing among us to stir a new 
imagination for the Church. We are blessed with 
countless gifts and resources.... By God's grace we will 
receive the creativity to match those gifts with the 
world's needs." 

We are truly a gifted people. The Holy Spirit equips 
all the people of God with the gifts necessary to edify 
the Chvu-ch and to carry the love of Christ to the world. 
To call out the gifts of the laity, the people of God, must 
be a central responsibility of every person in leader- 
ship. 

1). The Ministry of the Whole People of God. Vi- 
tal congregations accept their essential task of "equip- 
ping the saints for the work of ministry." They are 
effective in training and challenging laity for creative 
expressions of ministry within the congregation, to the 
community, and into the whole world. 

Can we allow ourselves to forget that Methodism 
was essentially a lay movement, and in its most vi- 
brant forms remains a lay movement yet today? John 
Wesley recruited and trained thousands of unordained 
persons in a wide range of leadership and ministry 
functions. 

For Mr. Wesley, growth toward Christian perfection 
is growth into discipleship. A life of good works, serv- 
ice and witness is the natvu-al fruit of faith growing 
through disciplined prayer and Bible study. Prayer, 
faithful attendance upon Holy Communion and Bible 
study are organically related to feeding the hungry, 
clothing the naked, helping the stranger, and visiting 
the sick and imprisoned. All personal holiness is social 
holiness. 

The Wesleyan experience shows that the biblical em- 
phasis on the priesthood of believers and the gifts of the 
Spirit is practical. The work of pastors, teachers and 
administrators is to equip the whole body for ministry, 
calling out, honoring and organizing the gifts of the la- 
ity into one unified body for prayer, service and wit- 
ness. 

We will debate in this General Conference recom- 
mendations from the Commission to Study the Minis- 
try. As we deliberate upon the forms of ordained and 
diaconal ministry in our midst, let us rejoice in the con- 
tribution which the Commission has made during two 
quadrennia of study. It has articulated again our clear 
understanding of the ministry of the whole people of 
God. The Commission concludes: 

"Ministry describes the service to which all the Peo- 
ple of God, individually or corporately, are called. To 
be a follower of Jesus Christ is to be in ministry. Each 
Christian's life is to be a conscious and intentional ex- 
pression of the ministry of Jesus Christ in all dimen- 
sions of living. This ministry is carried out through 
worship, witness, and service to others, both in the 
Christian communion and in the world." 



92 



May 6, 1992 



The critical question for us is this: will we put into 
practice in these days our biblical theology of the minis- 
try of all Christians? We confess that far too many con- 
gregations are damaged by lay apathy and clergy 
domination. 

We are especially concerned that in every country 
the gifts of lay women be fully honored and invested in 
ministry. Our full support of the WCC Ecumenical 
Decade of the Churches in Solidarity with Women is 
crucial. 

We take heart that the General Board of Disci- 
pleship is committed to a primary focus on strengthen- 
ing the laity. Programs to equip men for service in the 
Church and the community deserve our full support. 
The nurture of children and youth should be a priority 
in every congregation. 

2). Clergy Leadership. Several recent studies 
show that church growth and vitality emerge where 
clergy are enthusiastic and effective, when they know 
they are called and have confidence in the congrega- 
tion. 

If we seek confirmation of the relationship between 
enthusiastic leaders and a vital church, we need only to 
look to Mr. Wesley's innovative strategies for providing 
the scattered Methodist societies and classes with "the 
itineracy," the traveling lay preachers who gathered 
the isolated bands of new Christians into the "connec- 
tion." 

As we rejoice in the growing numbers of clergy 
women in om* midst, we recall that hundreds of trained 
class leaders and a nimiber of preachers under Mr. 
Wesley's guidance were women. We are true to that 
heritage. Growing numbers of women serve congrega- 
tions with distinction. Many are emerging as outstand- 
ing leaders of the denomination. We see clearly now 
that all forms of discrimination against women in min- 
istry deprive the Church of energetic leadership it des- 
perately needs. Patriarchal assumptions which blind 
us to the gifts of women do not belong in the Church. 

Mr. Wesley reluctantly came to see that effective 
pastoral leadership did not necessarily emerge from for- 
mal education. Yet he would not abide incompetence. 
The Methodist preachers were expected to "improve the 
time" by at least six hours of study a day. 

In an early Discipline, Mr. Wesley was challenged 
by a lay preacher with the words, "I have no taste for 
study. What shall I do?" Wesley thimdered: "Then cul- 
tivate a taste for it, or return to your former vocation!" 

In episcopal addresses to General Conference, we 
have announced again and again ovu- intention to "re- 
deem and renew the itineracy." We continue to affirm 
the unique role of the itineracy in our heritage and re- 
gard it as a powerful instrument for mission. We have 
seen its capacity to challenge racist, sexist and agist bi- 
ases which have excluded talented clergy in some de- 
nominations. It has often prevented the splitting of our 
churches by heated debate over whether the pastor goes 
or stays. Itineracy has assured continuity of leadership 
in our congregations, and provided clergy with a secure 
financial base to liberate their energies for ministry. 

In these changing times we commit ourselves to ex- 
ercise the episcopal power of appointment with creative 



sensitivity. We will take seriously thorough-going con- 
sultation in every place. We will welcome suggestions 
for innovative strategies to improve our methods. We 
will work pastorally to assure that every clergy person 
grows spiritually and professionally. We will assist in- 
effective clergy to seek another vocation. We will 
search for ways to overcome the disparity in salaries 
which hurt clergy morale and damage collegiality. 

We hope that the new health insurance plan for 
clergy being considered here will help us to control the 
rapid escalation of clergy compensation costs. These 
costs are sapping the missional energies of our congre- 
gations. 

We thank Grod for the marvelous gift to the world: 
thousands of Spirit-alive congregations of faithful peo- 
ple, a beacon of hope in a world agonizing with the 
birth pangs of a new age. 

Are we a New Testament Church today? We rejoice 
that the Spirit of the risen Christ which brings the 
Church into being lives among us. 

Our coiu-age and ingenuity will be severely tested as 
we face the crisis of an age in turmoil. Two initiatives 
by the Council have sought to energize our people to 
come awake to the struggles of the age: Substance 
Abuse and Urban Violence, and In Defense of Creation. 

II. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND URBAN 
VIOLENCE 

In April 1989, the Council of Bishops took the im- 
precedented step of releasing one of ovur number to min- 
ister full-time for a year to combat a major scourge of 
our time — substance abuse and urban violence. These 
are two interrelated features of a social disease which 
has grown to epidemic proportions. 

This Bishops' Initiative was taken in response to the 
vision and passionate concern of one man. Bishop Fel- 
ton May. Bishop May shared his agony that in the 
United States that an entire generation of talented 
black and hispanic youth is being lost, victim to social 
degeneration in the blighted hearts of large cities. The 
Council agreed and declared: "The massive deteriora- 
tion of the social fabric of major metropolitan areas 
across the United States qualifies for the temporary as- 
signment of a bishop to impact the life of the church." 
Bishop May was assigned to a year of ministry in 
Washington, D.C. 

Anyone who doubts the seriousness of the urban cri- 
sis should hear the words of the United Methodist pas- 
tors in Washington, D.C. who declared: 

"We are facing a systemic community pathology 
which we have often decried, but never cured. Social 
and racial conditions underlined by illiteracy, sub- 
standard housing, limited skill-training opportunities, 
isolation, chronic welfare dependency, family disorien- 
tation and magnification of the symbols of wealth over 
personal values and intellectual substance are all con- 
tributing factors. To this matrix of debilitation is now 
added the fuel of rampant drug abuse." 

Drug abuse presents a tragic story: the story of 
wasted lives and substance. Millions of users continue 







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Daily Edition Vol. 4 



93 



to spend billions of dollars in pursuit of drug-induced 
euphoria, fattening the bank accounts of drug pushers 
and fueling the fires of violence. Millions of arrests are 
made each year of felons showing traces of drugs in 
their systems. The courts are choked with them. Tens 
of thousands of young men and women are warehoused 
in prisons without treatment or rehabilitation. The 
press reports drug-related incidents among airline pi- 
lots, train engineers, bus drivers and others who violate 
the sacred trust of lives held in their hands. 

In the United States the medical costs of drug abuse 
are escalating, burdening a health-care system already 
in deep crisis. A million drug-exposed infants are re- 
ceiving long term care. The horrible AIDS epidemic is 
spreading in many nations through drug cultures. 
One-fourth of the AIDS victims in the United States 
have acquired the disease through contaminated nee- 
dles. 

* Legal drugs are by far the most commonly used 
and abused addictive drugs in the United States and in 
many other countries. Alcohol is the great destroyer of 
families. It kills and maims and fills our jails. Tobacco 
is the horrible killer, taking hundreds and thousands of 
lives annually. 

It is time now for us to take back our families from 
the scourge of harmful drugs. Through teaching, ex- 
horting, and modeling, let us advocate for a drug-free 
family environment. 

It is time now for us to take back our schools from 
drug users and drug pushers. Vigorous community ac- 
tion could make every school drug free. 

* While heroin use is still a problem, cocaine and its 
horrible form "crack" are the current focus of public 
concern. Urban minority communities bear the brunt 
of drug-related violence and tough law-enforcement 
measures. But let it register on our consciousness: 
most cocaine users in America live in white upper and 
middle class families, urban, rural, and suburban. 
Opulent homes in fashionable neighborhoods and hum- 
ble homes nestled in the valleys of rural America are 
invaded. Long lines of cars from suburbia swarm like 
locusts through low-income vu-ban neighborhoods, 
where poor people sell drugs to survive. 

It is time for us to take back our neighborhoods 
from cocaine users. The recreational use of cocaine is 
diminishing rapidly in many areas. The enemy is on 
the run. Let us work to hasten the day. 

* Almost all cocaine comes from Peru, Colombia, 
and Bolivia, where poverty-stricken farmers are forced 
to turn to coca production to feed their families. De- 
mand for the drug in the United States has created a 
$100 billion industry, twice what the country spends on 
oil imports. 

Government drug control programs in the United 
States cost more than $10 billion annually, 70% of it 
spent on law enforcement and a militarized program of 
intervention. It is increasingly clear that these highly 
publicized programs are failing miserably. Worse, gov- 
ernment corruption has added greatly to the scale of 



the cocaine trade. Evidence mounts that a "shadow 
government" has emerged in partnership with govern- 
ment intelligence agencies, trading gims for drugs in 
violation of the law, using intelligence assets as a cover 
for drug-running. They corrupt law enforcement offi- 
cials and intimidate members of congress, all in the 
name of the idol "national security". 

It is time for us to take back our governments 
from the drug barons. 

* The crisis of addiction and violence is clearly a 
spiritual crisis. It thrives on the spiritual hunger of liv- 
ing in highly secularized and materialistic cultures, 
where broken families and splintered communities 
leave a broad swath of emotional pain and spiritual 
bctrrenness. It thrives in a system which traps young 
people in decaying commimities, where racial discrimi- 
nation and systemic poverty sap their self-esteem and 
lay waste their potential. This is a direct challenge to 
the Christ who promised abundant living. 

We are on the front lines of this struggle. Let us live 
in the power of the Gospel as we reclaim our homes, our 
schools, our neighborhoods, our cities, our governments 
from the systemic evil of addiction. Only the power of 
the Great Physician can exorcise the demons and heal 
the wounds inflicted by this savage beast. 

III. IN DEFENSE OF CREATION 

The Council of Bishops was moVed to engage in an 
extraordinary intervention in the life of the Church 
and the wider society as leading scientists cried alarm 
at the horrible threat of nuclear weapons, not only to 
the hvunan family, but to the biosphere as well. The 
term "nuclear winter" entered our awareness, as com- 
puter data revealed that a nuclear war could release 
tons of sooty smoke into the atmosphere, cutting off 
sunlight and starving plants, animals, and people. The 
earth could suffer a second great dying time rivaling 
the catastrophe which destroyed the dinosaurs. To 
amass such destructive power and to threaten its use is 
the essence of blasphemy, a wanton challenge to the 
creator God who breathed life into being and who 
yearns for Shalom on earth. After two years of prayer 
and study, the bishops wrote: 

"We write in defense of creation. We do so because 
the creation itself is under attack. Air and water, trees 
and fruits and flowers, birds and fish and cattle, all 
children and youth, women and men live under the 
darkening shadow of a threatening nuclear winter." 

We called upon Christian people to become evangel- 
ists of Shalom, the biblical revelation that the Creator 
God is present in power to bring positive peace, joyful 
peace, just peace to the whole creation. We reminded 
the people that we are followers of Jesus Christ, the 
Prince of Peace, who commands us to love our enemies 
and promises the richest blessings to peacemakers. 

Our study received an overwhelming response. 
More than 90% of our congregations in the U.S. utilized 
the resources in various ways. The world press en- 
gaged in weeks of debate. The study was translated 
into six languages and utilized even in the Soviet Un- 



94 



May 6, 1992 



ion and Eastern Europe. A series of dialogues ensued 
with scientists and engineers at the Oak Ridge nuclear 
facility. 

Since then the world awakened to the dawn of a new 
hope. The Great Power struggle which had brought 
suffering to millions of people and threatened global ca- 
tastrophe began to wane. The fall of the Wall in Berlin 
was a powerful sign that kindled hope for a new day. 
Remarkable independent initiatives by the Soviet Un- 
ion toward disarmament startled the world. The Soviet 
economy was collapsing under the massive dinosaur ar- 
mor of its military-industrial complex. The Warsaw 
Pact fell apart as Eastern European nations claimed 
their freedom from Comumunist domination. The first 
significant agreement controlling nuclear weapons was 
signed; an entire class of intermediate nuclear weapons 
was destroyed. The Soviet Empire itself fractured into 
a number of independent republics, walking the razor's 
edge between freedom and chaos. 

The peace-makers of the world relaxed; many as- 
sumed peace had triumphed and turned to other causes. 
People spoke optimistically of a "peace dividend" that 
might relieve the impoverishment of the cities, under- 
write basic health care, fund environmental protection, 
and diminish the debt burden on the backs of the poor. 
Serious agreements were forged which would cut the 
stockpiles of strategic nuclear weapons. Conventional 
arms cuts were begun, partly through agreements but 
mainly through independent initiatives. 

It became easy to forget that some 50,000 nuclear 
war-heads remain in arsenals which threaten the major 
population centers of the northern hemisphere. The ex- 
plosive power of 1,000,000 Hiroshima bombs is still 
poised to incinerate millions of people, destroy the life- 
sustaining economies of the nations, and threaten even 
the biosphere. Nuclear testing continues, threatening 
new generations of horrible weapons and proliferation 
to other nations. 

As the world dreamed of peace, war in the Persian 
Gulf struck. A brutal dictator sent his troops across the 
Iraqi border to over-run a small neighbor, Kuwait. 
Quickly the world responded. An unprecedented alli- 
ance of nations met at the United Nations Security 
Council to demand that the invader withdraw. Interna- 
tional economic sanctions were brought to bear to force 
Iraq to retreat and to pay reparations to the nation it 
had brutalized. The universal consensus among relig- 
ious as well as political leaders was that Saddam 
Hussein must be contained. His destructive influence 
had to be combatted by sanctions designed to paralyze 
his capacity to remain in Kuwait and to menace his 
neighbors. 

Unfortunately, diplomatic initiatives and economic 
sanctions were quickly replaced by the relentless logic 
of war. Billions of dollars worth of high-tech weapons 
and more than a half-million troops were rushed into 
the Arabian desert. In 40 days, the most massive air 
armada in history smashed the Iraqi military. The cost 
in lives to the United States and its allies was minimal. 
Thousands of Iraqi troops and civilians died. Iraqi chil- 
dren are still at risk from the destruction of life support 
systems. 



Have we yet repented of the complicity of Western 
nations in the causes of war — billions of dollars of 
arms sales, first to Iran, then to Iraq — default on 
pledges of self-determination for the Palestinian people 
— sponsorship of Saddam Hussein himself during the 
80's — the uncritical support of an autocratic regime in 
Kuwait? 

Grave questions remain: Will the nations now sur- 
render to the heady militaiy triumphalism, the thrill of 
the giant video game in the sky, or will they finally 
recognize how foolish it is to seek security in the vola- 
tile Middle East or anywhere else by militarizing the 
region? Will the industrial nations continue their ad- 
diction to fossil fuels, or will they move now to develop 
sustainable sources of energy? Has the U.N. been 
strengthened at last in its peace-keeping capacity, or 
has the world lost a chance to demonstrate that outlaw 
nations can be controlled by a unified world using non- 
military means? 

Surely, we will fail to learn the lessons of history if 
we do not see the Persian Gulf crisis as but an acute 
episode in the course of a pervasive social dis-ease. 
This malady threatens the future of civilization and 
perhaps even the future of the species. Even more star- 
tling in the nuclear age is the threat to the biosphere it- 
self 

Our awareness of the impact of this larger chronic 
dis-ease on the body politic was sharpened by the World 
Council of Churches "Consultation on Justice, Peace, 
and the Integrity of Creation," held in Seoul, Korea in 
May, 1990. 

Delegates from all over the world met with the man- 
date offered by the words: 

"We are living between the flood and the rainbow: 
between the threats to life on the one side and God's 
promise for a new earth and a new heaven on the other. 
That is why we have gathered in Seoul to covenant for 
justice, peace, and the integrity of creation." 

The invitation to make a mutual commitment to jus- 
tice, peace, and the integrity of creation emerges from 
the awareness that these three overriding global issues 
are interconnected. The struggles must be welded into 
one coherent struggle for life against demonic systems 
of vast power and range. We may name these inter- 
locking systems: 1) Hunger-making Systems, 2) War- 
making Systems, and 3) Desert-making Systems. 

1. Hunger-making Systems. 

Most of the human family lives in abject poverty, 
one failed monsoon away from catastrophe. Women 
and children, the most vulnerable, suffer the most in 
every place around the world. More than 1.2 billion 
people worldwide do not get enough to eat to sustain 
life. 

One billion more people will be added to the world's 
population in the 90's. These are not "redundant peo- 
ple", as some economists claim. These are the people, 
the "crowds", whom Jesus came to heal and to save and 
for whom he died. In His day, they were the landless 
poor, the marginalized and oppressed, outcasts of their 
society. They were "harried and helpless, driven and 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



95 



riven". It was among those that he ministered. He 
broke bread with them in violation of the taboos of his 
culture. His promise that God was bringing a new 
realm of salvation to all people on earth kindled a spe- 
cial hope in them: the poor of the world, the "crowds" 
whom Jesus loved. 

On September 29th, 1990, seventy-one heads of state 
gathered in New York City for the World Summit for 
Children. Think of it! Seventy-one heads of state, the 
largest such gathering in human history, came to- 
gether to address a critical world concern. Why did 
they come? They gathered because 14,000,000 precious 
children die on this globe every year, two silent holo- 
causts. Two-thirds of these children die from diseases 
that can be cured or prevented at limited cost. United 
Nations agencies have estimated that if just 5% of the 
trillion dollar annual military burden which the hu- 
man family carries could be diverted into development, 
these children would not have to die. 

Former U.N. Secretary General P6rez de Cuellar ad- 
dressed the World Summit with the words: "Poverty is 
the main enemy of children." He said we now have a 
unique opportunity to establish a new world order that 
assures not only the maintenance of peace and security, 
but also the better management of the world's economic 
and social affairs. Who will speak for justice for the 
poor and destitute of the world, the "crowds", for whom 
Jesus lived and died? 

We praise God for the generosity of our people, for 
emergency relief and development work through UM- 
COR and our Advance Special giving. Adding our re- 
sources to those of Church World Service, Catholic 
Relief services, Lutheran World Relief, and other agen- 
cies, we offer a remarkable outpouring of generous 
sharing. 

We are a generous Church: 

* Our hospitals and homes offer tens of millions of 
dollars in free care each year; our schools and clinics in 
many countries convince our neighbors that we are a 
caring people. 

* Africa University is a reality! Classes have begun! 
It is a beacon of hope for thousands of talented young 
men and women who have little opportunity for higher 
education. From all over Africa, gifted students will 
come, future leaders on a continent where the Christian 
Church is blessed with the greatest growth. Let us all 
join in this effort. 

* Through Africa Church Growth and Development 
and a range of mission programs and Advance Specials 
we are building churches, schools and clinics in many 
countries. 

* Volunteers in service and action donate coimtless 
hours of skilled service, building and renewing 
churches, schools, and housing for the poor. 

Yes, we are a generous church. Yet we know that 
the suffering of the poor is more than a medical or a 
food problem. The death-dealing forces of economic and 



political systems which enrich the wealthy and margi- 
nalize the poor must be confronted directly. People's 
policies make people hungry. People's policies make 
people sick. Since people created those cruel jjolicies, 
people can change them, and people must change them. 
The global economy condemns the vast m^ority of 
earth's people to poverty and deprivation. It is the 
story of aid which does not aid, of "development" which 
does not develop, of loans which impoverish the bor- 
rower. This global system is designed to move re- 
sources from the place on the earth where they are 
most needed to the place where they are least needed. 
As a people of faith, we must join in the struggle to 
combat the root causes of global poverty. They are an 
affront to the Grod of justice, and a challenge to the con- 
science of every Christian. Only the faithful exercise of 
our political ministry can challenge these demonic sys- 
tems. 

2. War-making Systems. 

The militarization of the nations of the world is one 
of the great tragedies of our time. Great power strug- 
gles have been played out over the backs of the poor. 
Many poor nations spend more on the military than on 
development. Much of the military equipment they 
buy is utilized to war against their own people. The 
debt crisis in nation after nation is often related to the 
militarization of their societies. 

Unfortunately, not even one ounce of rice can be 
squeezed out of a tank. Energy and resources spent on 
war cannot feed hungry people or provide clean water. 

The threat of nuclear "holocaust in the future is real. 
But it is only a part of the crisis of militarism. The bur- 
den on the backs of the human family of a $1 trillion 
annual arms budget traps millions of the earth's poor 
in a slow-motion holocaust of death by disease and hun- 
ger. As we wrote in In Defense of Creation, 'The arms 
race itself cruelly destroys millions of lives in conven- 
tional wars, repressive violence and massive poverty." 
We could have gone on to speak of the health clinics, 
the immunization campaigns, the medical research 
never begun because the great war machine was gulp- 
ing up the people's resources. We might have called 
attention to the war against the poor in the form of 
"low intensity conflict." The suffering people of Cen- 
tral America can testify that "low intensity conflict" is 
low intensity only for its perpetrators, not for its vic- 
tims. 

We cannot allow ourselves to forget that entrenched 
military bureaucracies enriched by vast sums of the 
people's money do not give up easily. 

As the Cold War thaws, military enthusiasts of the 
West struggle to find a new enemy. Let it be said 
clearly: We have an enemy! The common enemy of 
humanity is militarism. We often say that an attack 
from extraterrestrial beings would unite the entire hu- 
man family in defense of the earth. The destructive 
alien presence is already among us. It is the cult of 
militarism, now bloated to giant proportions as it feeds 
on the goods needed for life. Its idolatrous ideology 



96 



May 6, 1992 



penetrates our minds and subverts the best intentions 
of good people, making it all the more insidious. 

We now know that the only security is common secu- 
rity. The "new world order" will not emerge from the 
end of a gun. It demands an entire change of hearts 
and minds, a transformation of values. It requires a 
new resolve to unite persons of good will all over the 
world to drive the hostile, alien presence from the 
earth. The military-industrial complexes in all their 
manifestations must be starved into weak and withered 
shadows of their former selves. 

3. Desert-making Systems. 

A rising chorus of concern from the scientists has 
called our attention to the emerging environmental cri- 
sis. As we hear their warning that atmospheric warm- 
ing might turn vast fertile areas of the planet into 
deserts, we recall again the words attributed to Chief 
Seattle: "Your appetite will devour the earth and leave 
behind only a desert". 

More than a century ago, the great orator and 
Squamish Chief Seattle wjimed of the future awaiting 
a people whose predatory spirit seemed so bent upon 
raping the earth. 

His words are prophetic. A recent Food First alert 
revealed that 15,000,000 people are in danger of starva- 
tion in the Horn of Africa, victims of war and disas- 
trous "development" programs which have turned 
fertile lands into deserts. 

On Earth Day in 1990, hvmdreds of millions of peo- 
ple world-wide launched a "decade of the environment" 
to encourage programs that preserve biological diver- 
sity, human health, sustainable industrial development 
and regenerative agriculture. 

Earth Day was a response to a disturbing litany: 
vast holes in the ozone layer — waters and air polluted 
— precious non-renewable resources squandered — 
global warming threatening vital food sources — rain 
forests bvuming — a great dying time among the crea- 
tures of the earth. 

Have we forgotten the command of God to "till" and 
to "keep" the garden of life? To till the garden is to 
treat it with respect and reverence. To keep the garden 
is to protect it, not to damage it. 

Now we must remember the African proverb: "We 
have not inherited the earth from our ancestors, we 
have borrowed it from our children." 

We rejoice in signs that the world is awakening to 
the ecological crisis. The U.N. Conference on En^TTon- 
ment and Development next month in Bra2dl will at- 
tract the largest gathering of heads of state in history. 
We pray that the nations will grasp this opportunity to 
commit themselves to environmental standards. We 
pray that the wealthy nations will increase their com- 
mitment to development and will assist poor nations to 
share in the protection of the planet. 

We know now that the concern for the integrity of 
creation must be joined to the struggle for peace with 
justice. Hunger- making systems force the poor to de- 
nude their environment, "eating their future" in the 



struggle to survive. The fate of the poor and the fate of 
the planet are interwoven. 

Militarization and state terrorism increase as the 
poor organize to free themselves from exploitation. The 
world's armed forces are a terrible polluter, and war 
lays waste the earth in a macabre dance of death. Now 
we know: we will have no peace on the earth until we 
have peace with the earth. We will have no peace on or 
with the earth until the people of the earth live to- 
gether in the harmony of a just social order. 

The Council of Bishops is giving serious considera- 
tion to leading the Church in a m^or study of this 
"first truly global crisis of civilization." We solicit your 
counsel. 

At Canberra, Australia, in February, 1991, Protes- 
tant and Orthodox leaders from around the globe gath- 
ered for the Seventh Assembly of the World Council of 
Churches. They came together to pray: "Come Holy 
Spirit, Renew the Whole Creation." They gathered con- 
fessing the Holy Spirit of all life, creator and sustainer 
of all that is. 

As we prepare ourselves for the struggle against 
massive corporate evil, may their prayers become our 
prayer: 

We pray to the Holy Spirit to transform us. The 
Spirit is a powerful presence in all creation, transform- 
ing persons and communities, society as a whole and 
the natural order. The Spirit moves within and among 
us, breaking the power of sin and revealing to us new 
possibilities for participation in the new age being bom 
in our time. A converted and converting people are a 
powerful force for breaking the old wine skins of oppres- 
sion. 

We pray for the Holy Spirit to renew us. The trans- 
forming Spirit renews our life for participation in the 
mystery of the crucified and risen Lord. Christ enables 
us to involve ourselves in the sufferings of the world 
and to identify with those who suffer. Through the 
power of the Spirit we are raised with Christ to a new 
life, a life lived for others. 

We pray to the Holy Spirit to sanctify us. In the 
power of the Holy Spirit, we are energized to become 
ever-more open to the presence and will of God. That 
presence enables us to reflect the values of the Gospel, 
responding to its demands and witnessing to its power 
through a courageous life of disciplined service to the 
world 

We must call omi a nations to repentance — a 
change of hearts and minds — a turning toward God 
and toward a renewed understanding of God's purpose 
for the whole creation. We need new vision. The world 
longs for renewed understanding of how we can live to- 
gether and live in harmony with the earth. Vital spiri- 
tuality must re-shape our basic values and 
assumptions, the meaning of ultimate reality. Our ca- 
pacity to envision and to image new futures emerges 
through the biblical witness. In a secular and violent 
world, we tenaciously proclaim: 

*God created the universe, the earth and all living 
creatures in love and hope. God blessed creation and 
declared it good. God asks the children of the earth to 
"till" and "keep" the garden of life, respecting and pro- 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 



97 



tecting the earth and all its inhabitants with love and 
reverence. 

** Jesus Christ, Divine love incarnate, came heal- 
ing, teaching and preaching; living among the poor and 
oppressed. He touched them and healed them, exor- 
cised their demons, sat with them at table assuring 
them that God was in their midst bringing liberation 
and wholeness. The healing and teaching of Jesus were 
a direct challenge to the demonic economic and social 
systems and values which marginalized the poor and 
oppressed of his day, and in ours. 

**The Holy Spirit, Breath of life, powerfully renews 
and redeems life in the face of suffering and death. The 
Holy Spirit creates and inspires the Church to be a 
compassionate and loving community. The Holy Spirit 
empowers and guides Christians to go forth into the 
world to heal and witness, to confront the forces of de- 
struction and death, and to witness to the vision of Je- 
sus for the dawning of the era of justice and peace. 

This is the faith which gives form to our imaginings 
and shape and dynamism to our vision. As we believe 
this vision with passion, will, and intellect, we become 
channels of God's creating and renewing Spirit. It is a 
deep spiritual truth that what we believe is what we 
help to bring into being. Can we lead our people to live 
from the heart of this vision, to stay in touch with it 
through daily prayer and disciplined Bible study? 

If we are discoiu-aged by the immensity of the strug- 
gle in this kind of a world, let us remember that we are 
a resurrection people. The resurrection is an event in 
human history which transforms all creation. It per- 
vades space and time. It restores to humanity that 
communion with God, with others, with nature defined 
in the Shalom intention of God. 

As the body of Christ, we share in the resurrected 
power of Jesus. We live in that power. Redemption and 
renewal are a present source of energy, creating com- 
munities of hope and new possibility, unifying and 
guiding vital congregations into faithful service. 

We live in the victory of Christ! So we never bow to 
a defeatist attitude, or allow powerful opposition forces 
to discourage us. Our mission is to live within the 
power of a resurrection faith. As we gather in praying 
community, litany and song prepare our inner life for 
the struggle for justice and peace on the earth and with 
the earth. 

We seek out signs of God's redeeming presence, cele- 
brate them, and live within their strength. We gather 
courage to witness "from within the belly of the beast" 
to the transforming presence of the Holy Spirit, who 
surprises us with the joy of redemption. 

We are a resurrection people. We know that in the 
bleakest of hours, God rolls away the stone of despair 
and comes forth from the tomb to bring new life. That 
is our hope and our witness. 



- ^i^.-^ ).rf-^ 



Emilio J. M. de Carvalho, President 




n. 



Jos^h H. Yeakel, FVesident-Designate 




:^^^ 




Melvin G. Talbert, Secretary 



The Episcopal Address has been written by Bishop 
C. Dale White who was selected by the Council of Bish- 
ops. It has been perfected for presentation at the 1992 
session of the General Conference after considerable 
preparation, including discussion and debate at regular 
meetings of the Council of Bishops. Though not reflect- 
ing the view of every bishop at every point, in finished 
form this address has been approved by the Council of 
Bishops of The United Methodist Church. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Berry, Thomas, The Dream of the Earth (Sierra 
Club Books, San Francisco, 1988). 

Brown, Lester, et.al, State of the World 1991 and 
1992 (W.W. Norton & Co., N.Y.C.) 

"Call to a New Beginning", (GCOM). 

French, Hilary Jr., After the Earth Summit .The 
Future of Environmental Governance fWorldwatch Pa- 
per #107, WorldWatch Institute, Washington, D.C., 
1992). 

Geyer, Alan and Barbara G. Green, Lines in the 
Sand (Westminster/John Knox Press, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, 1992). 

Gore, Senator Al, Earth in the Balance (Houghton 
MifQin Co., New York, 1992). 

In Defense of Creation (Graded Press, Nashville, 
1986). 

Intricate Web: Drugs and the Economic Crisis 
(GBGM, 1990). 

Limouris, Gennadios, Editor, Justice, Peace and the 
Integrity of Creation (WCC Publications, Geneva, 
1990). 

Mc Kibben, Bill, The End of Nature (Random 
House, New York, 1989). 

Messer, Donald E., Editor, Send Me? The Itineracy 
in Crisis (Abingdon Press, Nashville, 1991). 

Miller, Herb, The Vital Congregation (Abingdon 
Press, Nashville, 1990). 

Moyers, Bill, The Secret Government (Seven Locks 
Press, Washington, D.C., 1988). 

Nash, James A., Loving Nature (Abington Press, 
Nashville, 1991). 

Nelson-Pallmeyer, Jack, War Against the Poor (Or- 
bis Books, Maryknoll, N.Y. 1990) 

Ruether, Rosemary Radford, Sexism and God Talk 
(Beacon Press, Boston, 1983). 



98 



May 6, 1992 



Soelle, Dorothee, To Work and to Love (Fortress 
Press, Phila., 1984) 

The State of the World's Children, 1989 (United Na- 
tions 

Children's Fund, Oxford, U. Press, 1989). 
World Resources: a Guide to the Global Environ- 
ment, 1990-91 (World Priorities, Washington, D.C., 
1991). 



Vital Congregations: Faithful Disciples (Graded 
Press, Nashville, 1990. 

World Resources: a Guide to the Global Environ- 
ment, 1990-91 (Oxford U. Press, 1990). 



i 



Officers of Standing 
Administrative Committees 



Committee on Agenda 

Chair: Don Ott 

Vice Chair: Sarah Miller 

Secretary: Jim King 
Committee on Calendar 

Chair: Charles Jordan 

Vice Chair: Glenda Thomas 

Secretary: Beverly Ahbott 
Committee on Correlation 

& Editorial Revision 

Chair: Earl Riddle 

Vice Chair: Joe Graham 

Secretary: Naomi Barde 
Committee on Courtesies & Privileges 

Chair: Phyllis Ferguson 

Vice Chair: Donna L. Grubb 

Secretary: Dolores B. Queen 
Committee on Credentials 

Chair: Tal Oden 

Vice Chair: J. LaVon Wilson 

Secretary: Anita Iceman 
Committee on Journal 

Chair: H. Sharon Howell 

Vice Chair: Alice Ann Glenn 

Secretary: Randall C. Brock 
Committee on Presiding Officers 

Chair: Allen Norris 

Vice Chair: Vance Summers 

Secretary: Nancy Foster 
Committee on Reference 

Chair: L. Ray Branton 

Vice Chair: Loretta Young 

Secretary: Jane McCullough 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



99 



Proceedings of the 1992 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



Tuesday Afternoon, 
May 5, 1992 

Bishop Emilio JM. de Carvalho, 
presiding 

There were 996 delegates elected to the 
General Conference That would mean 
that it would take 499 to constitute a 
quorum. Just prior to the worship service, 
Uiere were 926 who had registered. There- 
fore, we do have a quorum. As far as roll 
caU is concerned, the chairpersons of each 
of the delegations have the roll caU infor- 
mation at their places and it will be taken 
in that manner. 

BISHOP EMIUO J.M. de CARVALHO: 
Thank you veiy much. Let me tell the 
conference that you are meeting with the 
awareness of the reactions worldwide to 
the Rodney King verdict The Agenda 
Committee will be announcing this after- 
noon a time for the conference to focus on 
this matter. Let me call upon Dr. Charles 
E. Lutrick, chairperson of the Commis- 
sion of the General Conference. 

CHARLES E. LUTRICK: Bishop Chair- 
man de Carvalho, members of the Council 
of Bishops, delegates, officials, and 
visitors: On behalf of the Commission of 
the General Conference, we extend greet- 
ings and welcome to each of you. We wel- 
come you to the conference which 
concludes the second century and begins 
the third centuiy of General Conferences 
in The United Methodist Church. We 
espedaUy welcome those who are attend- 
ing General Conference for the first time 
as elected and reserve delegates. The com- 
mission is given responsibility for deter- 
mining the time and the place for General 
Conference and making all the arrange- 
ments for the sessions. The names of the 
commission members are found on p. 5 of 
the Advance DCA. The names of the 
Louisville local committee are found on p. 
6 of the Aduance DCA. These persons have 
worked prayerfully to prepare for your 
arrival. These persons wiU be presented 
and recognized at a later time in the con- 
ference session. We are very appreciative 
of the gracious hospitality extended by our 
local hosts and hostesses. At this time we 
are to receive an official greeting from the 



Louisville Area host Bishop, Bishop 
Robert Spain. 

BISHOP ROBERT H. SPAIN: That's a 
nice introduction, sir. We have been wait- 
ing so long for you to coma The time is 
here and you are so welcome to Kentucl^ 
and to the Louisville Annual Conference. 
We are, by some standards, a small annual 
conference with some 88,000 United 
Methodists in this part of our conference. 
But, from all of them, you are very, veiy 
welcome to our conference and to the 
Commonwealth of Kentucky. It's veiy in- 
teresting that this area became a state at 
the same time that our General Con- 
ference had its beginning. You will see a 
number of signs arounc^ our dty and 
around the state marking 200 years. Well, 
they put all of those up just to let you know 
that this is 200 years of the General Con- 
ference. The fact is that we're celebrating 
this time together and you are so welcome 
here. Since you were elected and we 
received your names, I want you to know 
that the people of our annual conference 
have been praying for you by name every 
day. There have been prayer groups all 
over our conference holding you before 
the Lord for the work that you are to do. 
We still pray for this conference. There 
will be a time that we can introduce our 
people who made all of this possible, but 
our prayer for you is that you hold the 
church before the Lord. You have a great 
vision. Accept the challenge that is before 
us, and let's make a difference. Welcome 
to Louisville! 

LUTRICK: This session of the General 
Conference has been planned in accord- 
ance with the plan of organization of the 
General Conference. To facilitate the 
work of the conference, the commission 
recommends the following schedule of 
special activities for your approval: the 
Episcopal Address at 8:15 p.m. this eve- 
ning. This service will be preceded by the 
Hymn Sing which will witness to the in- 
clusive nature of our church. The Laity 
Address at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 6; 
Louisville Area programs, Sunday, May 
10, at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Presentation of 
the eciimenical representatives at 9 a.m. 
on Tuesday, May 12. Bishop, I move these 
recommendations' approval for the con- 
ference. 



BISHOP de CARVALHO: You have 
heard the recommendations. If you ap- 
prove of these recommendations, please 
raise your hand. If you oppose, by the same 
sign. They are approved. 

LUTRICK: The commission is respon- 
sible for the seating assignments which 
are determined by law. We recommend 
approval of the plan as printed on pp. 7-9 
of the Advance DCA. We further recom- 
mend that the commission be authorized 
to make any necessary at^ustments in the 
seating assignments. I move the approval 
of the seating assignments. Bishop. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, if you 
approve these recommendations, please 
raise your hand. If you oppose, by the same 
sign. They are approved. 

LUTRICK- Sections of the hall have 
been designated for persons with hand- 
icapping conditions. Marshals imd pages 
wiU be pleased to direct persons to these 
areas during sessions of the conference. It 
is requested that there be no smoking in 
public areas of the center during the con- 
ference. Food services will be provided in 
the cafeteria and halls throughout the 
conference. Breakfast and lunch will be 
available daily except Sunday. No 
electronic communication devices are to 
be used in the plenary hall or in legislative 
committee meeting places except by 
General Conference or the convention 
center staff. Morning worship service is 
scheduled for this hall at 8:30 a.m. daily 
except Sunday, and the choir will present 
a brief concert at 8:15 a.m. before these 
services. Worship services are provided 
daily except Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the 
Trinity United Methodist Church at 537 
S. Third St., a short 4 blocks away. Visitors 
are welcome at these services. The choir 
will present a brief concert at 2 p.m. prior 
to these afternoon services. We express 
appreciation to our director of music, Mr. 
Brad Kisner, for his endeavors on these 
and other worship services. It was his 
responsibility to select 10 singing groups 
to participate in the General Conference 
worship experiences. That was not an easy 
responsibility since there were 84 audition 
tapes presented for him to make the selec- 
tion. I remind you that announcements 
are to be made through the DCA. Oral or 
projected notices are to be limited to the 
official operation of the conference, its 



100 



May 5, 1992 



administrative and legislative commit- 
tees. The commission recommends that 
the journal be volumes 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the 
DCA. Bound copies will be available for 
purchase as a package at a later date. I 
move approval of these recommendations, 
sir. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the recommendations. Any questions? If 
you approve these recommendations, 
please raise your hand. If you oppose, by 
the same sign. They are approved. 

LUTRICK: The commission recom- 
mended 2 offerings be received during the 
conference. The one just received will be 
designated by the Council of Bishops. 
Second, an offering for marshals and 
pages will be received on Wednesday, May 
13. I remind you that these persons are 
volunteers who provide their own travel 
expense and other expenses while here. 
They provide an invaluable service to the 
conference del^ates. I move the recom- 
mendations of these 2 offerings as desig- 
nated. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the recommendations. If you approve 
these 2 reconunendations, please raise 
your hand. If you oppose, by the same sign. 
The recommendations are approved. 

LUTRICK: The backdrop and the 
screen arrangement before you were 
designed by Dr. DeWayne Woodring, 
General Conference business manager 
and executive director of the Commission 
on General Conference. We are indebted 
to Dr. Woodring for his thoroughness in 
caring for the numerous details in plan- 
ning this conference This is his 20th year 
of involvement in the preparation for 
General Conferences. He is knowledge- 
able and experienced in all necessary 
provisions for large conferences and con- 
ventions worldwide. He is firm and fair in 
negotiations which respect good 
stewardship for the church's funds for 
General Conferences. We suggest or re- 
quest that Dr. Woodring speak to several 
matters which pertain to the basic opera- 
tions of the conference. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Dr. DeWayne 
Woodring. 

DEWAYNE WOODRING: Bishop and 
participants in the General Conference, in 
1988 The United Methodist Church led 
the religious world in the utilization of 
electronic voting at its General Con- 
ference in St. Louis. During that event a 
number of ecumenical leaders were 
present. And noting the effectiveness of 
the voting system, they are now utilizing 



electronic voting during their m^or as- 
semblies; among these are such religious 
bodies as: the Presbyterian Church USA, 
the Church of the Nazarene, and the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Each has 
found this innovative method provides a 
speedier and more accurate tally of votes 
cast and thereby enhances the movement 
of conference business. 

In front of each of you who are voting 
delegates is the result of the latest re- 
search in the field of electronic voting. 
Utilizing this key pad you may record your 
vote instantly. When the presiding bishop 
states, "please vote when the light ap- 
pears," the green light on your key pad will 
light up. Also a message directing you to 
vote will appear in the small window on 
your key pad and on the Itirge screen in the 
center of the staga 

Next, press the button which cor- 
responds to your choice Press button 1 for 
"yes"; press button 2 for "no"; press button 
3 for abstention. When you do this, your 
choice will appear in the window of your 
individual key pad and confirm your selec- 
tion. 

Now you may change your vote as long 
as the green light is stiU on by first press- 
ing the star button on the lower left-hand 
comer, and then entering your new 
choice When the green light on your key 
pad starts flashing, you have 3 seconds lefl 
to vote And when the light goes off, all 
voting is closed. The computer will tally all 
the votes cast, and the results will be 
shown on the large video screen. Please 
remember that only one response will be 
taken from each key pad. So pushing the 
button 10 times will not get you 10 votes. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: That's the 
way. 

WOODRING: So you may become 
familiar with the system, we are now going 
to present a few questions for you answer 
at this time. The first question before you 
is a most difficult one: "Are you present?" 
If yes, please press button number 1. If you 
are not here, press button number 2; and 
if you do not know for sure, and wish to 
abstain, press button number 3. The ques- 
tion is before you. Please vote when the 
light appears. 

(Laughter because 795 report yes, they 
are here— 44 say no). 

Apparently the m^ority of you are here. 
But some percentage of you are not here 
and several really aren't too sure 

Question number 2: How did you get 
here? Respond by pressing your button: 
number 1, airline; number 2, pogostick; 3, 



car; 4, horse; 5, walk; and 6, for those who 
don't know. The question is before you, 
please vote when the light appears. 

(43 percent came by air-59 percent \ 
don't know how they came) 

I really didn't think I'd have any takers 
on the pogostick one (75 persons said they 
came by pogostick). 

Apparently a majority of you came by 
airlines. When it comes time to take an 
electronic ballot of those nominated for 
certain offices, the procedures are exactly 
the same Assume for a moment you are 
all once again back in school and you are 
given the opportunity to vote on a new 
campus mascot. As with the elections 
which will eventually be before us in the 
days of this conference, we will use 2 digit 
numbers. The nominees for campus mas- 
cot are: 11, Minnie Mouse; 18, Big Bird; 34, 
Mickey Mouse; 45, Kermit the Frog; 57, 
Pluto; and 69, Bugs Bunny. The question 
is before you; please vote when the light 
appears. 

(Laughter). The vote shows that you 
have selected Kermit the Frog as your 
campus mascot, and so ends this brief 
demonstration of the electronic voting 
system. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Thank you. 

WOODRING: The Commission on the 
General Conference and the Rules Com- 
mittee reminds you that each delegate hzs 
one vote and this one vote is to be recorded 
only on the key pad in front of the 
delegate. Absentee delegates may not have 
their votes recorded by others, except 
when a reserve delegate has been duly 
authorized to be seated in place of the 
delegate 

Since the beginning of the Communion 
service this aflemoon, you have had the 
opportimity to benefit from another mar- 
vel of the electronic age: the ID Four Mag- 
nification System. The enhancement of 
visual images enables each one of us to feel 
more closely involved in the presenta- 
tions, discussions and debates on issues 
facing our church. 

In keeping with the changing times, the 
central focus of this plenary hall will be 
ever changing. Throughout the past his- 
tory of General Conference a static un- 
changing backdrop or stage setting has 
served as a focus of the plentuy sessions. 
This time, the video screen is the focus of 
attention. On this screen, a variety of im- 
£iges will greet you each time you enter this 
hall. In the morning, for instance, the 
portrayal will specifically relate to the ser- 
mon topic to be presented during the wor- 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



101 



ship service. As persons enter for the 
afternoon and evening sessions, a portrait 
of the church at work throughout the 
world will be projected on the screen. And 
during the business sessions, the image 
magnification system will help all us keep 
abreast of the discussions. 

WOODRING: When a specific item in 
the DCA is under consideration, the page 
number and the report number wiU ap- 
pear as you can see illustrated at this time. 
You will therefore not only have the oral 
annoimcement of the topic being dis- 
cussed; you will also have the visual an- 
nouncement so that aU will know the 
subject we are focusing our attention on at 
a particular moment and tima It was 12 
years ago that a new system was utilized 
which helped assure an equal application 
of the time limitation imposed upon in- 
dividual debate as well as committee 
reports. The timing device has proved so 
successful it too is now used by other 
denominations. The system we use is com- 
prised of green, yellow and red lights 
which are set for the time limit allowed. 
The green light comes on when the 
speaker has 2 minutes remaining. The yel- 
low light is illuminated when 1 minute 
remains to close. When the red light 
comes on, the time is up and the presiding 
officer will rap the gaveL For the third 
time in our long history of General Ck>n- 
ferences, we are providing simultaneous 
translation by electronic means for those 
delegates requiring such services. Utiliz- 
ing wireless equipment, plenary sessions 
and worship services are being trans- 
mitted into 6 languages and broadcast to 
special receivers designed for use by the 
individual delegates. Translations of the 
proceedings are in French, German, 
Spanish, Portuguese, Korean and 
Chinese. Any del^ate requiring transla- 
tion equipment may check out a headset 
from the local committee office in the 
lobby. For those requiring sign langiiage, 
a section of the hall has been set aside for 
this purpose and should a seated delegate 
require such interpretive services, a spe- 
cial television set will be placed on the 
delegate's table which will display the 
signer's interpretive movements. To help 
you delegates to handle the voluminous 
number of petitions the Ck>mmission on 
the General C!onference has for the first 
time published a volume 3 of the DCA 
which contains all petitions from in- 
dividuals, churches and other United 
Methodist bodies. In addition, when you 
go to your individual legislative commit- 



tee, awaiting you in that room will be a 
computer with all the petitions under con- 
sideration. Through this system you will 
be able to perfect each item right there on 
your 0¥m computer without the repetitive 
typing required in the past. It is our sin- 
cere hope that through the use of image 
magnification, electronic voting, the auto- 
matic timing device, wireless interpreta- 
tion, signers and the additional volume of 
the DCA, that the efficiency of the con- 
ference wiU be enhanced and it will be 
more meaningful to all participants. 
Thank you. 

The Commission on the General Con- 
ference recommends per diem allowance 
be set at $62. 

Bishop, I move the approval of this 
recommen dation. 

It has been moved. If you approve this 
recommendation, please raise your hand; 
to oppose, by the same sign. 

CLIFFORD DROKE: (general secretary 
and treasurer of the General Council on 
Finance and Administration and General 
Conference treasurer) 

Thank you, Bishop. If any of you have 
an urgent need to discuss anjrthing with 
the chairperson of your delegation, I sug- 
gest that you resist that and hold because 
if the chairperson is confused about how 
you get reimbursed, you won't get one. It 
just won't happen. The delegates will 
receive two expense reimbursement 
checks whUe they are here The first one 
you should receive Friday morning and it 
will cover your travel expenses to and from 
the General Conference. The second 
check will be for the $62 per day per diem 
for the days that you were here in Louis- 
villa The chairperson of each delegation 
should have discovered at their desk as 
they arrived an envelope containing travel 
expense vouchers for all members of the 
delegation. Those are to be given to prin- 
cipal delegates or for whatever reasons, all 
of us are keenly aware that we lost 3 
delegates by death. If a reserve has been 
seated and is entitled to the travel expense 
reimbursement, give it to that person. We 
ask each of you to do some simple things. 
Read the instructions; they're on the back 
of the form. Fill out the form the way the 
instructions tell you to. Give it to your 
chairperson. The chairperson will ap- 
prove it and submit the full delegation's 
expense claims together, please, to the 
treasurer's offica Don't hand them in just 
as delegates hand them to you. We're 
prepared to process almost a thousand 
checks by del^ation and it's very helpful 



to us if we get them altogether. The 
General Commission on the General Con- 
ference office on the mezzanine level of 
the building; the mezzanine here just up 
one flight of escalators. The commission 
office is there and past the commission 
office the treasurer's office is in the far 
northwest comer. Delegates from the 
Central Conferences, that is from lands 
other than the U.S., who may have some 
special needs are encouraged to go to that 
office. We have a stafTperson there-a staff 
person related to the treasurer's office 
who will be equipped to help you with any 
speciid needs that you hava 

The travel expense vouchers, if you 
traveled by car, it's 27.5 cents per mile up 
to 1,000 miles roimd trip. If you are driving 
more than a thousand miles round trip, 
it's either mileage or it's whatever would 
have been cheapest for you to travel by air. 
We'll reimburse at the cheapest leveL If 
you traveled by car, you may claim actual 
expenses for meals and lodging en route 
up to $62 per day for the per diem. If the 
chairpersons will hand in all the expense 
claim forms to the treetsurer's office before 
business begins in tomorrow evening's 
(that is Wednesday evening's) session, we 
will get checks to you on Friday. If we 
don't get them by Wednesday evening, we 
don't know if we'll get them to you on 
Friday. 

Now, presumably on Friday you will all 
get expense checks. Let me tell you how to 
get money for them. It's very simpla You 
go to the Liberty National Bank on West 
Jefferson Street across the street from the 
convention center. We have established 
an account thera The checks will be 
drawn on that. They should be cashed 
with no problems at alL If, in addition to 
the expense reimbursement checks you'll 
receive, you want to cash personal checks, 
you may do so for up to $100 per check, 
provided you first go to the treasurer's 
office and have one of us who are 
authorized at the bank initial it In effect, 
we are guaranteeing your check so that the 
bank does not have to get nervous with 
checks coming in from a variety of places 
in the world. The bank's open from 9 to 4, 
Monday through Thursday, 9 to 5 on 
Friday. The treasurer's office, the General 
Conference treasurer's office is open from 
8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at least five dajrs a week 
and maybe more than that 

PISHOP de CARVALHO: Thank you. 

LUTRICK: The commission wishes to 
express our thanks and appreciation to 
Robert Lear and the staff of the United 



102 



May 5, 1992 



Methodist Conununications for their 
coverage of General Conference, to the 
Louisville local committee for their work 
prior to and during this conference and to 
Richard Peck and the publishing house for 
production and distribution of the Daily 
Christian Advocate. I report to you that 
the commission has responded to an in- 
vitation of Bishop Roy L. Sano in the Den- 
ver Area and has selected Denver, CO, for 
the site of the General Conference for 
April 16-26, 1996. Thank you for the 
privilege of serving the General Con- 
ference. Bishop, I move the reception of 
this entire report 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, 
Microphone 8, please. 

JOHN BUXTON (reserve delegate, 
Detroit): Is this the time to propose an 
amendment for the general plan of or- 
ganization or am I premature? 

LUTRICK: That's for the committee on 
plan of organization. Bishop. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Proceed. 
Thank you. If you approve the full report, 
please raise your hand. If you oppose, by 
the same sign. Report has been approved. 
I turn now to the report of the Committee 
on Planning of Organization Rules of 
Order. Dr. William McCartnQr, please, 
chairperson. 

WILIJAM A. McCartney (East 
Ohio): Bishop and members and friends of 
the General Conference. The report of the 
Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order is found in your Advance 
DCA beginning on p. 83. Over the past 
quadrennium, our committee has been 
grateful for our role as your servants in 
preparing for this general conference. As 
we have done our work on your behalf, we 
have grown in our appreciation of the 
General Conference, and of the work and 
the diligence of delegates and others who 
are a part of that General Conference. In 
doing our work, we have been aware of 
what we might call our own quadrilateral. 
We have been indebted to the traditions of 
the General Conference. We have been 
aware of the reasoning of helpful sugges- 
tions that have come to us from those who 
were a part of the 1988 General (Con- 
ference. We have benefited from the con- 
siderable experience of members of our 
committee One member, for instance, is 
here now in what I calculate to be his 9th 
consecutive General CJonference. One 
other is a person who has served on this 
committee (Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order) over a number of quadren- 
niimis. That coupled with the experience 



and expertise of persons like Carol3m Mar- 
shall and DeWayne Woodring has been a 
part of that valuable experience And we 
have also what I would call a scripturallike 
commitment to the general conference to 
be an agent of (jod's church. 

Out of that, I think, has come a set of 
rules and the perspective that is both well- 
grounded and also set to be very dynamic 
and very much alive. The faith in Christ 
that is a part of all of us, built upon our 
form of the quadrilateral, is also that 
which is alive and growing. Perhaps there 
are several ways that I can illustrate the 
dynamic quality of any sets of rules. As 
DeWayne indicated to you, we are now in 
the second quadrennium of using 
electronic balloting. The rules of order 
indicate electronic balloting as one of the 
alternatives to ballot by hand. In fact, it is 
our expectation that from this point on all 
balloting, even on some of the simplest of 
issues, would be done by electronic means 
so that no presiding bishop needs to make 
the decision about whether or not this is 
or is not a matter deserving of that kind of 
balloting. 

Secondly, we realize that in eveiy pre- 
vious General (inference the rules that 
are used to govern deliberations begin in 
a somewhat generous basis in terms of a 
variety of things, like the number of 
speeches for and against, the length of 
speeches, and the rules that govern the 
consent calendar. It is not very long into 
the deliberations of plenaiy session in the 
second week when the tyranny of time 
begins to take over and the rules are 
changed oftentimes from the floor. And 
so, as one way of trying to establish a 
realistic middle ground, the committee 
has suggested some changes in the defini- 
tion of consent calendar and you would 
fmd that in Rule 27. 

And stiU, people ask us questions and 
call for changes even now. One person 
noted that Rule 35, which calls for an 
automatic vote on any motion after there 
have been 3 speeches for and 3 speeches 
against a particular motion, is more than 
ample for many of the issues and motions 
that may come before us, but may not be 
adequate for those small handful of issues 
that are very weighty and considerable in 
importance. I think you would understand 
that no writing of rules could anticipate 
and articulate every circumstance that 
would ever come before us in that regard. 
But in contrast to that or perhaps as a 
companion to that, I remind you that Rule 
37 provides the opportunity for the 



General Conference to suspend rules for 
that small singular nimiber of issues 
which may require for an extension of 
debate. 

Another thoughtful delegate called me 
recently concerned about the fact that 
membership on the legislative committees 
is not always equally balanced between lay 
and clergy delegates. Now, that alignment 
of persons on that committee comes be- 
cause of another sacred element in the life 
of the General Conference, the right of 
delegates to choose according to their se- 
quence of having been elected to General 
Conference. If the General Conference 
were to seek to change one sacred rule for 
another, the way that you would do that 
would be to signal that to the Committee 
on the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order that will be elected at this General 
Conference and that will be at work for 
you in the ensuing quadrennium. 

AU of this, I think, is by way of saying 
that rules cannot anticipate every legisla- 
tive exigency. There is no guarantee of 
perfection. And particularly, there is no 
guarantee for the mood and the spirit of 
the way that we operate. The most effec- 
tive contributions to that will be found in 
the diligence in the work that all of us have 
done in preparation for this event, the 
graciousness of Christ that we would hope 
would be permeating through all of the 
discussion and all of the debate, and final- 
ly the prayerful commitment of each one 
of us to seek and articulate God's will for 
our lives, individually and corporately. 

In that regard, it is our hope that our 
laborers in this document will be your ally 
in all the work during these weeks, and 
thus, Bishop, I move the adoption of our 
report. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, thank 
you. Microphone No. 7. 

VICTOR W. GOLDSCHMIDT: (North 
Indiana) We are looking at p. 97, rule 17. 
Mr. Bishop, I have 2 comments. One is a 
typo, and the next will be an amendment, 
if I may. Is a typo first on a rule 171 believe 
should be referring to rule 11.4, not to 
11.3. Now if I may make an amendment, I 
believe that for the purpose of clarification 
it would help if we inserted the following 
words in p. 100, left column, item 2, p. 100 
left column, item 2 of rule 35; line 5 where 
it says that after 3 speeches for and 3 
against, a question shall be put automat- 
icidly, I move to amend that to read as 
follows: that after 3 speeches for and 3 
against and provided no secondary mo- 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



103 



tions come before the floor, the question 

rhall be put automatically. 
BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, you 
heard the amendment 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Could I explain that 
in case there is no second? 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Is this being 
seconded, please? 

McCARTNEY: It has been seconded, 
please speak the amendment, please. 

GOLDSCHMIDT: Bill, what this per- 
mits us is to realize that there may be 
times where 3 speeches jump in for, 3 
speeches against An attempt for an 
amendment is not heard. It has not al- 
lowed any further discussion on the 
primary motion, but if an amendment 
comes forth, it allows discussion of that, 
starting a new cycle. I think that it is 
already implicit the way the document 
reads, but I want it to be very clear. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, you 
heard the amendment The chair wants to 
speak. 

McCartney (chairman of the com- 
mittee): I would simply say in response to 
Dr. Goldschmidt that there's a sense in 
which what he raises is relevant. I think 
that the experience has shown us that by 
and large, secondary motions usuaUy 
emerge before there have been 6 speeches. 
If it is believed by the body that that is not 
so, the body has the opportunity to add 
such an amendment. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, if you 
approve the amendment, please vote 
when the light appears. The amendment 
has been approved. (The vote is 426 yes, 
425 no, 29 abstained. The amendment was 
approved.) 

Microphone No. 4. 

GRAYSON ATHA (West Ohio): I'm 
deeply concerned that in the legislative 
section on ordained and diaconal ministry 
that the clergy outnumber the lay 3 to 1. 
I, therefore, want to make the motion 
using an esteemed colleague's words. Mr. 
McCartney, I'd like to send a signal. I move 
that the Rules Committee consider the 
method of assigning persons to legislative 
sections so that the balance of lay and 
dergy would reflect the great tradition of 
our church in having equal repre- 
sentation. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: It has been 
seconded. Are you speaking for future 
meetings or for these reports? 
f ATHA: I'm just speaking so that this 
matter may get before us. 



BISHOP de CARVALHO: I think you 
should speak for the report or to the report 
before us. 

ATHA: I'm making a recommendation 
for the future. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: After the 
report has been presented, you can make 
your motion, please. Yes microphone No. 
8, please. 

JOHN BUXTON (Detroit Conference): 
I move to amend by addition, general plan 
of organization. Old section Roman 
numeral 9, now proposed section Roman 
numeral 10. Delegates' expense accounts. 
This is on pp. 93 and 94 of the DCA Ad- 
vance Edition 1. New paragraph "C as in 
Charlie. For the dates General Conference 
is in session, no General Conference 
delegate shall receive expense money from 
the general church or any of its boards and 
agencies other than the approved per diem 
and travel expense available to all 
delegates. This provision does not apply to 
members of a body required by the Dis- 
cipline to convene at annual conference. 
This provision is not to restrict fmancial 
assistance to delegates from their own an- 
nual conferences. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the motion. 

BUXTON: I believe I heard a support at 
the right. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: I didn't hear 
any support. You can speak louder, pleasa 

BUXTON: My rationale, currently 
members of a general agency or a commit- 
tee of a general agency can vote to convene 
a meeting at the cite of General Con- 
ference and pay its members' full expen- 
ses. This, in fact, did occur at the 1988 
General Conference. These expenses have 
exceeded the approved per diem and travel 
expenses. I believe that all delegates to 
General Conference should be entitled to 
receive the same per diem and same travel 
expenses as all other delegates from the 
general church. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, you 
heard the motion. If you approve this mo- 
tion, please vote when the lights appear. 

(The motion is yes 709, no 191, 
abstained 25. It has been carried). 

The motion has been approved. Yes, 
microphone No. 3, please. 

BILL HINES (West Ohio): Bishop, I've 
got a question. The 1988 General Con- 
ference approved a modification to rule 
29. It does not appear in rule 29 as it is 
recorded on pp. 28 and 29. The action that 
I refer to is recorded on p. 117 of the 1988 
DCA. I have a copy here if you wish to see 



it. That action is as follows: At the end of 
rule 29 after the word "priorities" insert 
before the period a comma and the words 
"unless it is given special instruction by 
the General Conference." I would like to 
ask the chair whether this clause wiU be 
added to the rule in accordance with that 
action taken or should we act on it again 
now? 

McCARTNEY: BiU, wouldyou make the 
reference again, please? I didn't follow 
that, and others may not have. 

HINES: This was in 1988, p. 117 of the 
DCA, and this particular change. Bill, was 
made at that time, but it is not recorded 
presently. 

McCARTNEY: In the rules? 

HINES: Yes, it is. Rule 29, correction. 

McCARTNEY: We did not have that in 
front of us, and I would not be sure why 
we did not. Our committee certainly 
believed that we had in front of us the 
rules by which the 1988 General Con- 
ference had operated, and we used that as 
the basis as going from ther& It is true that 
no one Greneral Conference can bind a 
succeeding one. So what is before us is 
appropriate action for us now. 

HINES: Do you agree with that. Bishop? 
And if it is, I would like to make a motion. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, please. 

HINES: I move that at the end of rule 
29 after the word priorities. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: This is point 
no. 1; rule 29, point no. 1? 

HINES: That's right, 29, No. 1. 

Insert before the period a comma and 
the words "unless it is given special in- 
structions by the General Conference." If 
there's a second, I will give the reasons for 
that 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: It is 
seconded. 

HINES: The argument in favor of this 
amendment is the same as it was when it 
was made four years ago. It makes the 
authority of the conference to instruct the 
committee explicitly. There may well be 
situations where in order to facilitate its 
overall work, the conference wishes to 
give a committee specific instructions 
with regard to timing or some other mat- 
ter related to priorities or some other 
issue. This makes the authority of the 
conference explicit without violating the 
other provisions of this rule. Therefore, I 
urge that the conference adopt this 
amendment 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: First, you 
heard the amendment; please vote when 
the lights appear. The amendment passes. 



104 



May 5, 1992 



(752 yes, 1 16 no, 57 abstain). Any other 
question on this plan of organization. 
Rules of Order? Go to the microphone, No. 
5, please. 

GUS GUSTAFSON (North Georgia): 
Bishop, my name is Gus Gustafson from 
the North Georgia Ck>nferenca I am a 
layman. I have an amendment to rule 8; 
it's found on p. 96 of the DCA; it's in two 
parts. Part 1, in the first sentence after the 
words, 'no longer than 3 minutes," insert 
the words, "on a main or substitute mo- 
tion, 2 minutes on an amendment or 1 
minute on an amendment to an amend- 
ment". And in part 2, in the last sentence 
delete the words "3 minutes" and insert in 
their place the word "time". Rule 8 would 
then read as follows, "No member shall 
speak a second time on the same question 
if any member who has not spoken desires 
the floor, no more than twice on the same 
subject under the same motion, and no 
longer than 3 minutes on a main or sub- 
stitute motion, 2 minutes on an amend- 
ment, or 1 minute on an amendment to an 
amendment" That refers to rule 35.2. 
This time limit may be amended by a 
minority of the conference at any time and 
for any period of duration. If there is a 
second, I would like speak to this amend- 
ment 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: It has been 
seconded. 

GUSTAFSON: Do I have a second? 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes. 

GUSTAFSON: All right This amend- 
ment to rule 8, together with rules 21 and 
35, will provide for orderly debate and 
consideration of the issues. In previous 
General Conferences, members have 
often moved amendments in order to 
make speeches on the main motion. Then 
the only way to get things stopped was to 
move the previous question on all before 
us. That tactic is an abuse of our rules. 
This amendment would shorten those 
speeches and amendments and would en- 
courage the members to make their 
speeches on the main motion when it is 
properly under consideration. Therefore, 
I urge the conference to adopt this amend- 
ment. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You have the 
amendment Microphone No. 4, please 

ROBERT CASEY (Virginia): Bishop, I 
would oppose this motion which is made. 
It seems to me that there are many times 
that the amendments are more important 
sometimes than the main motions and 
they alter significantly the things that are 
being discussed. All of us have concern for 



time. I think we have found ways in times 
past to cut off debate, and I do not think 
this motion is necessaiy. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes. You have 
the amendment before you. Please vote 
when the lights appear. The amendment 
is not approved. (Yes-298, No-592, 
Abstain-27) Let's go back to the report, 
the full report with the committee and 
plan organization Rules of Order. 
Microphone No. 6, please 

V.L. DAUGHTERY JR. (South Geor- 
gia): Clergy. I refer to p. 93, section 9. I 
would like to add these words on line 3, 
"when any proposal is submitted to the 
General Conference to establish an inter- 
im or continuing board, commission, or 
committee, and at that point the proposal 
shall state an estimated cost of the 
proposal, and before final action is taken 
by the General Conference establishing 
such board, conunission, or committee, 
said proposal shall be referred to the 
General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration or its executive committee 
with a request that it bring to General 
Ckinference an estimated budget of the 
expense of the operation of the proposed 
board, commission, or committee for the 
next quadrennium, and a statement of 
how the adoption of such proposal . . ." and 
so forth. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the amendment here. 

DAUGHTERY: If I could have a second. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: It has been 
seconded. 

DAUGHTERY: I would simply like to 
say in times past while debate is under 
way, we have been debating proposals for 
study committees and we had no idea of 
what the cost of such a study committee 
was going to be. In a previous General 
Conference I asked the question of the 
person making that proposal, and in 
honesty that person said, "I have no idea." 
I think in a local church we better have an 
idea of what something is going to cost, 
and I hope in the General Conference we 
will be as sensitive to the cost of studies. 
Thank you. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You have the 
amendment Please vote when the lights 
appear. Thus the amendment passes. 
(699-Yes, 200-No, 15-Abstained) Thus, 
you have the report of the committee 
before you as amended. If you approve the 
full report, please vote when the lights 
appear. The full report. The report has 
been approved. (860-Yes, 17-No, 10- 
Abstained) 



McCartney (chairman): That com- 
pletes our work. Bishop; thank yoa 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Thank you. J£ 
tura now to the Committee on Nomina'^- 
tions and Elections. With their report 
Yes, please, microphone No. 4. 

ATHA: Qergy. Do I understand that I 
would be in order to make this motion now 
concerning the legislative sections? 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, you are 
in order, please 

ATHA: Ok. I move that the Rules Com- 
mittee of 1996 consider the method of 
assigning persons to legislative sections so 
that the balance of lay and clergy would 
reflect the great tradition of our church 
and have an equal representation. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You have 
heard the motion. It has been seconded. 

ATHA: I love The United Methodist 
Church and one thingi love about it is that 
we are so careful in being fair in commis- 
sions, in agencies. We mtike certain that 
not only we have a btdance of clergy-laity, 
but the wide variety of people in God's 
creation. In legislative sections in that one 
unordained ministry, it's 3 to 1 in clergy. 
I realize that that may not happen every 
time. It did happen the last general con- 
ference and I'm here because I hope it will 
not happen in another General Con- 
ference. I know aU issues are brought to 
this group that's equal between lay and 
clergy. However, a great deal goes on in 
the legislative sections and it seems to me 
to be a point that we need to consider 
carefully that in those sessions where 
these issues are thrashed out that there be 
more of a balance than appears at least in 
this section this year. Thank yoiL 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, 
microphone No. 6. 

BEN FEEMSTER (Central Texas): 
There are many of us in our conferences 
that have just enough delegates, both lay 
and clergy combined, to have one repre- 
sentative on each committee. Many of us 
would rather have a representative from 
our conference on each committee than to 
be limited to the number of committees by 
balancing lay and clergy. When delegates 
choose their committees, also, the laity 
could choose the Committee on Ordained 
and Diaconal Ministry if it so chose. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Microphone 
No. 2, please No. 2. In the back, the 
delegate who's coming now. You wait for 
the next one 

CHARLES SAYRE (Southern New Jer- 4 
sey): A member of the Rules (Committee 
Just recalling Mr. McCartney's statement 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



105 



that the right of a delegate to choose hia 
^mmittee is a very precious right The 
^Plecond factor is the mechanics of this. I 
can't imagine how this would be balanced 
without totally changing the way we select 
our committees. We usually convene after 
an annual conference and we have the 
right of free choice. Who is going to tell us 
how to balance it? We'd create a 
nightmare of supervision, and I don't 
think the conference secretary could in- 
struct the delegates when we are choosing 
committees how to dedda I think both 
that this takes away a fundamental right, 
and second, it is an administrative, 
nightmare and I would hope to oppose the 
motion. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Microphone 
No. 2, please. 

J. LAVON KINCAID (Western Pen- 
nsylvania): My query is if I vote in favor of 
this motion, does this mean the spirit will 
also be, for example, to be sensitive for a 
balance of inclusion in regards to ethnicity 
and gender? That's the question. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Do you also 
want to speak for the amendment? If you 
approve the amendment. I'm sorry, you 
speak for this amendment Please vote 
when the lights appear. That's a good ex- 
ercise. The amendment is not approved. 
(136-Yes, 795-No, 10-Abstain) May I call 
upon the coordinator of the calendar to 
present nominations and elections? 

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Bishop, I 
place in nomination the name of John M. 
Broad HI as coordinator of calender. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, you 
heard the nomination; is there any other 
nomination? Please vote when the light 
appears. The nomination has been ap- 
proved. The Committee on the Plan Or- 
ganization and Rules of Order, Bishop 
Talbert 

BISHOP MELVIN G. TALBERT: 
Bbhop and members of the General Con- 
ference, on behalf of the Council of 
Bishops, I place in nomination the follow- 
ing persons for the committee of Plan of 
Organization and Rules, and I apologize 
and the secretary does as well that we 
don't have these names before you, but: 
Richard Hamilton (North Central), Har- 
vey Manchester (Northeast), Marvin Mc- 
Reynolds (South Central), Jerry Bray 
(Southeast), Robert Stevens (Western), 
David Quee (Central Conference); and 
fethen the at-large category: Edna Williams, 
Carmen Carrico, Sandra Dufresne, and 
Phylemon Titus. 



BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the nominations for the Committee on the 
Plan of Oiganization and Rules of Order. 
Please vote when the light appears. The 
names have been elected to this commit- 
tee. (870-Ye8, 30-No, 45-Ab8tain) The 
report of the conmiittee on the agenda, 
perhaps you can take up that matter that 
I raised in the beginning. 

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Yes. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Please, meet 
on the agenda. 

DONALD OTT (Wisconsin): Bishop de 
Ciirvalho and members of the conference, 
I am Don Ott, the chairperson of the Agen- 
da Committee, elected yesterday. Your 
Agenda Committee named ex officio and 
by members of the Council of Bishops 
desires to serve you in the dajrs ahead by 
assisting you in the use of time. That has 
been a commodity that has already in our 
time today been identified by many of you 
as a concern with your motions and con- 
versation. Time, we look at in the commit- 
tee as a gift of God, who sets the 
boundaries of our living and our dying, 
even as boundaries are set for our time 
together as General Conference. We hope 
in the days ahead to enable you to move 
together toward knowing the mind of God 
on the matters that are before us. As chair 
of the committee, I will be reporting to you 
daily the Agenda Committee's recommen- 
dations. I would remind you of the Plan of 
Organization VIII.A.(1) which directs that 
all matters not included in the regular 
business of the conference be referred to 
the Agenda Committee without motion or 
without debate. The agenda for this eve- 
ning has already been set by your action 
and the proposal from the Commission of 
the General Conference. We will be 
together tonight at 7:45 for hymn sing, at 
8:15 for the Episcopal Address. You have 
also already set part of the agenda for 
tomorrow beginning at 8:30 a.m. a 30- 
minute period for worship, then at 9:00 a 
30-minute period for the Laity Address. I 
bring the recommendation from the 
Agenda Committee that the balance of the 
morning tomorrow be utilized in the fol- 
lowing manner at 9:30, for a 5-minute 
period, 2 elections: the Inteijurisdictional 
(Committee on Episcopacy, and the trus- 
tees of the John Street Church. Then at 
9:35, for a 30-minute period, persons who 
are prepared to lead in a response to the 
Rodney King verdict; that to be followed 
by necessary reports of the Agenda Com- 
mittee, the Presiding Officers Committee, 



and then adjournment to the legislative 
committees at 10:10 a.m. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the recommendation, microphone No. 10, 
please. 

JIM LAWSON (California Pacific): I 
wish to amend the agenda committee's 
report for tomorrow morning with the 
following amendment, or substitute mo- 
tion matter, that the Wednesday morning 
plenaiy act of the Laity Address be 
devoted to the issue of the conference's 
response to what has been titled the llod- 
ney King Trial". Secondly, that Wednes- 
day be designated a day of prayer or 
fasting by the General Conference for aU 
who can fast. And then three, that before 
the General Conference adjourns, one of 
the scheduled worship services becomes a 
service of reconciliation and healing in the 
Native American tradition. I make this as 
an amendment and if there is a second, I 
would like to address it. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: It has been 
seconded. 

LAWSON: I don't ... I hesitate using 
the term, "Rodney King event" because, I 
think that as one coming from Los An- 
geles and living through part of those 
days, and with a congregation where there 
is a tremendous amount of activity going 
on in service of relief, legal services, and 
with a concern for justice, that I don't 
quite see it as a Rodney King event I see 
it as a burning bush event, ala Exodus the 
third chapter, that indeed (jod has again 
brought a kaironic moment to the church 
and to the nation, tmd needs to have some 
of us hearing and recognizing that this is 
not just an ordinary urban affair. It is 
rather God arresting our attention and 
asking us, or rather calling us to the fact 
that there is holy groimd in our nation, 
and that we need to stop and see what is 
happening. And so it's a call also to repen- 
tance, and we need that desperately in our 
land. When we talk about police brutality 
or excessive use of force, or when we talk 
about the pain, we ought to recognize 
what went on in Los Angeles was so 
diverse across the massive metropolitan 
area that it was more than aU of that It 
represents the pain in our society, the pain 
of violence, family abuse, the murder 
rates, the suicide rates. Those folk who 
bum, they are responding in a society of 
violence, not simply a society of racism. 
And we, I think, that the General Con- 
ference would be remiss if we came here 
and simply adopted the agenda we have 
been adopting for the last year and did not 



106 



May 5, 1992 



spend some time fasting and prajring and 
then also some time in plenaiy talking 
about it There are indeed literally any 
number of people in this conference who 
know something about what this repre- 
sents and would help us to understand it, 
so that perhaps the General Conference 
could find an agenda for mission and evan- 
gelism that indeed might make a dif- 
ference in the life of the church, in the life 
of this nation, and in the life of our world. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: You heard 
the amendment Microphone 13, 
microphone 13. 

PHILLIP WOGAMAN (Baltimore): 
Clergy. I strongly support this motion, but 
I want to make an inquiry whether there 
is implicit here an opportunity for the 
General Conference to make a statement 
publicly about these events, and I note 
that there would be no petition in our 
preliminary material that would be in that 
form. And therefore my inquiry. Bishop, 
is whether there would be need now for a 
motion to suspend the rules to permit 
those who wish to draft such a statement 
to the church and nation from this body. 

OTT: Bishop, perhaps I can help. The 
Agenda Conunittee received a request 
from several people for the time aUotment 
tomorrow. They indicated to us that they 
were prepared to bring to the conference 
such a statement that had been worked 
out by groupings at the conference site I 
believe, therefore, that that would be a 
part of that presentation that was 
originally proposed 

WOGAMAN: The people who do this 
will bring such a motion to suspend the 
rules properly. 

OTT: No, that they were planning to 
bring a statement which then could be- 
come the property of the conference if it 
desired to do that 

WOGAMAN: All right 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, micro- 
phone 14. 

MAXIE DUNNAM (Memphis): I would 
also like to support the motion, but if it is 
passed, I would like to amend that the fast 
day be on Thursday. Some of us have 
joined with Methodists around the world 
in fasting after the style of Mr. Wesley, 
beginning the fast on Thursday evening 
and continuing through noon on Friday. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: If the maker 
of the motion agrees with this amendment 
. . . microphone 10, please. 

LAWSON: Jim Lawson, Cal-Pac. Yes, 
we wiU accept that amendment of the fast 



day from Thursday evening through 
Friday noon. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Microphone 
No. 4. No. 9, go to microphone No. 9, 
please. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER (French): 
[unintelligible]. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Your con- 
ference, please 

SPEAKER: [unintelligible]. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: [unintel- 
ligible] Not yet You can speak, you can 
speak [unintelligible] but don't wait for 
you. 

SPEIAKER: Merd, monsieur. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Thank you 
very much. 

(translated from French) 

I want to support the motion that has 
been made I think we all have interest in 
supporting this motion. Because in the 
beginning we refer to the ministry of the 
Christians. Each time we have to make 
such an important decision, we need to 
pray to the Lord. This is a great decision 
and I don't know if we can imagine how 
great a decision we are going to make We 
need to humble ourselves before the Lord 
so that he can assist us. Thus the event 
the motion before you. If you approve the 
motion . . . 

OTT: Bishop . . . 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes, please 

OTT: I did not hear the specification of 
a time aUotment in the motion. My imder- 
standing was a designation of the pleneiry 
tomorrow. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: And the fast- 
ing on Friday. 

OTT: Thursday, I believe My question 
to you is, if there is a time allotment set 
along with the motion, the plenary tomor- 
row was scheduled to conclude after the 
laity address. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: The motion 
was that this be done after the presenta- 
tion of the laity address was the motion 
made 

OTT: For what period of time? 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Microphone 
No. 10, please 

LAWSON: The intention and intent 
the intent of our motion is that the plen- 
ary after the Lait>' Address to the 
remainder of time for the plenary of 
tomorrow morning. 

OTT: Then I would say that that is 
consistent with the Agenda Committee's 



agr" 
onL 



report which indicated a time until 10:10 
a.m. 

LAWSON: The plenaiy in the morning 
then, does not go on imtil 12:30. It goes oc 
until 10:10? 

OTT: That's correct it's scheduled now 
only until the end of the Laity Address or 
9:30 a.m. Our recommendation as a com- 
mittee to you was to extend it for a 30- 
minute period plus some elections that 
would take it until 10:10 a.m., then to 
legislative committees which has been the 
pattern and is now established 

LAWSON: Then I think the intention 
of the motion is that it would be for the 
entirety of that morning. 

OTT: That's what I was trying to clarify. 
Thank you. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Please vote 
when the light appears. (5 14- Yes, 376-No, 
19-Abstain) The amendment has been ap- 
proved 

OTT: Bishop, I understand then that if 
the Agenda Committee report is adopted 
as amended, the conference should plan to 
be in session here imtil 12:30 noon. 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: That's right 
Yes. If you approve the report on the com- 
mittee on Agenda as amended please vote 
when the light appears. (620-Yes, 272-No, 
10-Abstain). The report has been ap- 
proved I may call upon again Bishop Tal- 
bert, you forgot one item in our agenda. 
He is going to speak for it 

BISHOP MELVm G. TALBERT: In 
keeping paragraph 604 of The Book of 
Discipline it is the responsibility of the 
Ck>uncil of Bishops to place in nomination 
secretary of the (jeneral Conference, and 
in behalf of the Council of Bishops, I place 
in nomination the name, Carolyn Mar- 
shalL 

BISHOP de CARVALHO: Yes. Other 
nominations shall be permitted from the 
Qoor. You heard the nomination for 
secretary designate Any other nomina- 
tion? Please vote when the light appears. 
(872-Yes, 39-No, 19-Abstain.) The name of 
Ciirolyn Marshall has been elected 
secretary designate for this (Jeneral Con- 
ference Any other business, an- 
nouncements? 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: Yes, Bishop, 
there are two announcements. One, the 
(Committee on Plan Organization and 
Rules of Order which was just elected will 
meet tonight at 9:15 in room 115 and in 
addition, there will be a meeting of the 
officers who will be elected in the legisla'A 
tive committees just a little bit later this 
afternoon along with the coordinators. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 2 



107 



the l^islative coordinaton in room 114 
■Uso at 9:15 this evening. 
BISHOP de CARVALHO: Thank you. If 
no other business, let me thank all of you 
for this lifetime opportunity to preside the 
opening session of this General Con- 
ference Thank you very much. This has 
been a very rewarding experience. You 
stand adjourned. You walk to your com- 
mittees and please close the day or the 
afternoon in your own committee You 
stand adjourned. 

Tuesday Evening 
May 5, 1992 

Bishop Robert H. Spain, presiding 

BISHOP ROBERT H. SPAIN: While 
the choir is finding their places, I think 
you would want to know that last week at 
the Council of Bishops meeting, Bishop 
Garrison arrived in Lexington and was 
inunediately notified that his daughter 
had been killed in an automobile accident 
Bishop Garrison's daughter was the 
mother of Ron KaufTmann who has been 
leading us tonight, and I would want you 
to know and keep him in your prayers. 
Thank you, Ron, for being here and help- 
ing us to celebrate in such a fine way. 

Twelve short walks from where we sit 
tonight, one of the great leaders of The 
United Methodist Church was bom. That 
leader is with us tonight in the person of 
Bishop Roy Short. There is no person here 
that is any nearer home than Roy Short 
right here tonight. And what a privilege it 
ia for us. He's my bishop. He's the bishop 
for many of yoiL And what a privilege to 
have him to open our service tonight with 
prayer. Bishop Short 

BISHOP ROY SHORT: Let us pray. 

(prayer) 

BISHOP SPAIN: In the bylaws of the 
Council of Bishops, there is a paragraph 
that dictates that the Episcopal Address to 
the General Conference will be given by 
one of the members of that coundL And 
that person is chosen by ballot It is not a 
seniority system; it doesn't rotate by juris- 
dictions, but by ballot that bishop is 
chosen. The bishop chosen to deliver the 
address from the Council of Bishops to 
this group tonight is Bishop C. Dale White 
Bishop White has served as a pastor, as a 
yiistrict superintendent, and as a staff 
member of a general agency. In 1976 he 
was elected to the episcopacy, con- 



secrated, and served and had presidential 
responsibilities over the New Jersey Area 
for 8 years and is just completing 8 years 
in the New York Area. It is a privilege for 
the Council of Bishops to bring you this 
address tonight and it is to be given by 
Bishop C. Dale White, and I wish you 
would greet him at this moment 

BISHOP C. DALE WHITE: (Episcopal 
Address, p. 88) 

BISHOP SPAIN: Thank you, Bishop 
White We heard you carefully tonight, 
and we will look forward to reading your 
words as we have those before us, and 
hopef\illy you have set a tone for this en- 
tire conference. We thank you very, very 
much. I call on Dr. Allen Norris for a 
report from the Presiding Officers' Com- 
mittee 

ALLEN NORRIS (North Carolina): 
Bishop Spain and members of the Gieneral 
Conference, it will be the procedure of 
your CJommittee on Presiding Officers to 
announce dttily the presiding officers for 
the succeeding day. We are pleased 
tonight to annoimce that the presiding 
bishop for tomorrow morning session's 
will be Bishop William B. Lewis of the 
Dakotas Area. 

BISHOP SPAIN: Thank you veiy much, 
and you will do that every day, Allen, is 
this right? Thank you very much. Mrs. 
Marshall, do you have announcements for 
us tonight? Tomorrow morning at 8:15, 
the choir from the Apache, Ok, United 
Methodist Church will be here to lead us 
in our worship {md in our singing. Bishop 
Schowengerdt will be our preacher in the 
morning, and I hope that all of you are in 
your places by 8:15 for this morning wor- 
ship. This will set the tone for the things 
that we are about We've waited a long 
time for you to come to Louisville as I said 
to you today; now it seems with the com- 
mtmion service, the organization of the 
afternoon, the Episcopal Address tonight, 
we are on our way. I hope that you will 
keep all of our deliberations firmly in your 
minds and souls as you enter into your 
prayer times, and that we can be led by 
God's spirit to do what is right for his 
church. Mr. Kaiser, I want us to close 
tonight with a song, with a hymn. I am not 
sure that that is on our agenda. Where is 
Mr. Kaiser? Somewhere here Over here 
If you would lead us, sir, I think it would 
set us on our way. 

KAISER: Please stand and join me in 
singing one verse of "Blest Be the Tie That 
Binds." 

(Adjournment) 




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Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Thursday, May 7th, 1992 



Vol.4 No. 3 



L.A. Concerns Quicken Historic Action 



By substantial majorities, the General Conference 
Tuesday endorsed a multi-point response to issues of 
justice and peace raised by the verdict in the Rodney 
King trial. 

Some details remain to be worked out, including the 
text of a resolution to be considered later. Vote margins 
of three to one or better on the main points appeared to 
indicate clearly the mind of the church's top legislative 
assembly. 

Included in the proposed response are: 

* a pastoral letter from the Council of Bishops to the 
more than 41,000 congregations around the world ask- 
ing that Pentecost weekend (June 6-7) be a weekend of 
prayer and fasting, with an offering to be shared be- 
tween annual conferences and the United Methodist 
Committee on Relief (UMCOR); 

* a message to the nation from General Conference; 

* creation of a "Shalom Zone" in Los Angeles — the 
rebuilding of a strategically located city block or its 
equivalent with the necessary buildings, businesses, 
and social services needed for "life, liberty, and the piur- 
suit of meaning"; 

* a 24-hour fast by delegates beginning Thursday af- 
ternoon, with money that is saved to be used at the dis- 
cretion of UMCOR or the Council of Bishops for 
assistance in ravaged areas of Los Angeles (UMCOR 
has established an Advance Special number of 901735-2 
for contributions toward relief in Los Angeles); 







Agenda 






Thursday, May 7 


8:30 


a.m. 


Worship 


9.00 


a.m. 


Africa University 


9:20 


a.m. 


Courtesies Committee 


9:25 


a.m. 


Committee on Agenda 
Committee on Presiding Officers 
Announcements 


9:30 


a.m. 


Plenary Ac^journment 


9:45 


a.m 


Legislative Committees 


2:30 


p.m. 


Legislative Committees 


7:30 


p.m 


Legislative Committees 



* a review of all pending legislation to identify 
points relating to the issues raised by the King trial. 

More than three hoiurs were devoted to the presenta- 
tions by an ad hoc committee of Western Jurisdiction 
delegates and others prior to the balloting on the recom- 
mendations. The delegates had approved on Tuesday 
the setting aside of their scheduled Wednesday morning 
legislative committee meetings. 

Included in the presentations was a history-making 
moment when the delegates and visitors formed small 
groups to discuss the issues. Veteran observers of as 
many as 15 previous General Conferences said they 
never had seen such groups in a plenary session. 

A "call to repentance and action" from the ad hoc 
committee said, "We stand in the tradition of John 
Wesley, who went into the places where people were 
helpless, wounded, and disenfranchised to live out and 
preach salvation and social holiness.... Our confession 
must move us now to repentance and action." 

The statement urges the U.S. Department of Justice 
to move "with all immediacy to investigate civil rights 
violations in Los Angeles and other cities." The church, 
the ad hoc delegation said, must "explore and develop 
working relationships with community, social, and po- 
litical leaders to address issues of employment and eco- 
nomic need." 

In a role that recalled his leadership as a young pas- 
tor against racism more than two decades ago during a 
special session of the General Conference in St. Louis, 
the Rev. James Lawson called on United Methodists to 
"hear the voice of the church to transform a violent soci- 
ety." Lawson, pastor of Holman United Methodist 
Church in Los Angeles, chaired the ad hoc committee. 

"The fires, death, and destruction have affected all 
our communities," he said. "But worse than this shock 
is the pathology of American racism. Our society is 
teaching millions of people that their lives are worth- 
less." 

In Lawson's opinion, nothing — even in the 1960s — 
"equals the impact and depth of this experience." 

United Methodists in Los Angeles already have 
taken offerings and set up "saving stations" for assist- 
ing with food, medicine, transportation, and other 



(continued on next page) 



114 



May 7, 1992 



(continued from p. 1) 

needs. Much additional financiad assistance is needed, 
Lawson said. 

Other speakers represented the points of view of 
other racial and ethnic minorities in The United Meth- 
odist Church. 

The T~uesday business session opened with the Laity 
Address by Ruby Farish, Tulsa, Okla. She called on 
United Methodist laypersons to get up off their apathy, 
move out of their churches, and start applying their 
Christianity to challenges in their communities. If this 
is done, she said, the world will become a better place. 

The "voices of the faithful call out to us today to be- 
come ignited with the spark of the Holy Spirit as we 
participate in the ongoing, creative Kingdom of God," 
Farish said. 'T believe that as we move from private 
faith to public responsibility, we United Methodist laity 
are increasingly assuming our priesthood. It is a priest- 



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hood that believes in the redemption of the world, not 
the redemption of the church." 

The delegates will devote most of Thursday to meet- 
ing in legislative committees. A brief plenary on Thurs- 
day morning will include a report on Africa University. 

— Robert Lear 



"Jim Lawson Live" Captured L.A. 
Crisis 

May 7, 7 a.m. and 9 p.m., "Jim Lawson Live — 

Special Edition" and General Conference 

News Update 

Within hours of the beginning of last week's Los An- 
geles crisis, United Methodist Communications and the 
Vision Interfaith Satellite Network fVISN) made plans 
to air a special program dealing with national and local 
reactions to the events in California. 

As a result, on April 30 at 7 p.m., the Rev. James M. 
Lawson Jr., "Jim Lawson Live" host and California-Pa- 
cific Conference delegate, opened the telephone lines 
and the microphones to people across the United States. 

The resfwnse was heartwarming. Callers represented 
diverse geographical regions, races, religions, and 
walks of life. The tone was reflective and conciliatory. 
The church heard from the people. The audience wit- 
nessed a thoughtful, strong Christian response from 
The United Methodist Church as well as the callers' 
views. 

This was not network television with sound bites. It 
was the church speaking responsibly and at length. 

Delegates and visitors can see a rerun of this pro- 
gram in their hotel rooms at 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. May 7 
over the following channels: Brown Hotel, Channel 8; 
Gait House'Galt House East, Channel 16; Holiday Inn 
Downtown, Channel 6; Hyatt, Channel 4; Seelbach, 
Channel 14; and other hotels, Visitel channels. 



-Bruno Caliandro 



Legislative Committee 
Coordinators 

Church and Society- — Bette Trumble; Conferences — 
Loretta A. Young; Discipleship — SongJa Park; Faith 
and Mission — Anita Owen Fenstermacher; Financial 
Administration — jTine McCullough: GeneralJudidal 
Administration — Richard L. Wright; Global Minis- 
tries — Arvin R. Luchs; Higher Education and Chap- 
laincy — Phil Granger; Independent Commissions 
— Nathaniel Tumer-Lacj-; Local Church— Ray Branton; 
Ordained and Diaconal Ministry — Rosa Washington. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



115 



Handbell Choirs 
To Lead Thursday Worship Services 




The St. James UMC Celebration ringers from Little Rock, Ark., will help lead worship today. 



The Celebration Ringers from St. James United 
Methodist Church, Little Rock, Ark., and the 1991 Lake 
Junaluska Fellowship Ringers will lead the two Thurs- 
day worship services. Both choirs are under the direc- 
tion of Felix and Martha Lynn Thompson, diaconal 
ministers of music at St. James. Martha Lynn Thomp- 
son will also serve as organist for both services. 

In July 1991, the Thompsons were the handbell clini- 
cians at the national convocation of the Fellowship of 
United Methodists in Worship, Music and the Other 
Arts at Lake Junaluska, N.C. Twenty-six adult ring- 
ers/directors from across the United States were se- 
lected from the 48 that auditioned for places in the 
advanced handbell choir. In three one-hour rehearsals, 
this group prepared music to share in one of the convo- 
cation worship services. After a 10-month separation, 
the group members have come to Louisville at their own 
expense from 13 states. 

The Celebration Ringers are a select group of senior 
high school students. Each year this choir, along with 
three of the other 11 handbell choirs at the church, par- 
ticipate in either the regional or the national American 
Guild of English Handbell Ringers festivals. They have 



toured extensively and have twice presented concerts in 
the Washington National Cathedral. The Celebration 
Ringers have been chosen twice by the Harold Flammer 
Publishing Co. and Omnisound, subsidiaries of 
Shawnee Press, to make recordings in a select series of 
handbell records and tapes. 

Felix Thompson is the church's choral director; 
Martha Lynn Thompson is the organist. They have 
served St. James as music directors since shortly after 
its founding in 1969. Their ministry of music encom- 
passes 16 choirs with more than 450 participants. The 
handbells encourage teamwork; help develop self-con- 
trol, dependability, and self-confidence; and allow ring- 
ers to share their talents. 

Preaching in the 8:30 a.m. service of worship will be 
Bishop Felton E. May of the Harrisburg Area. Phyllis 
Elizabeth May will be the liturgist. 

At the 2:30 p.m. service in Trinity United Methodist 
Church, the Rev. J. Jeannette Cooper, district superin- 
tendent of the Newark District, West Ohio Conference, 
will preach. She will be assisted by litiirgist Don W. 
Mendenhall of Des Moines, Iowa, administrative assis- 
tant to the bishop, Iowa Area. 



116 



May 7, 1992 



Ministry of the Laity: 

"Serving God in Our Private Lives and Public 
Responsibilities — Connecting Faith and Action" 

by Ruby Galloway Parish 



It was early spring. The 
winter was past. The rains 
were over and gone, and the 
time of the singing of birds 
had come, but Mary Ann and 
I hardly knew it. We were in 
deep conversation about 
Mary Ann's mother's long ill- 
ness and her death a few days 
ago. There was a knock at my 
door. I opened the door, and 
there stood a rosy-cheeked lad 
about thirteen years old. He 
held his hands behind him 
and he sang out, "Over hill, 
over dale, my love for you 
will never fail!" 

And then he handed me a 
huge bouquet of tulips. He- 
said, "Flowergram!" 

I replied, "Why, thank you," thinking some friend 
from last weekend's Walk to Emmaus retreat, some 
friend was continuing her gift-giving to me. This must 
be her young son, I thought. 

So in true Emmaus fashion, I asked, "May I give you 
a hug?" 

He answered, "Well, I'd rather have a tip!" 

So, I gave him a dollar and he went whistling down 
my driveway. 

Mary Ann looked at me quizzically. "Ruby, I do be- 
lieve those flowers came right out of your tulip beds out 
there by the street. Let's go see!" 

Sure enough, the broken stems matched perfectly 
with the stems in my beautifvil flowergram bouquet. We 
laughed, too. Those tulips would have shattered in the 
Oklahoma winds had I not opened my front door that 
day to that innovative lad. 

Now, I have found United Methodist laity are inno- 
vative, too, but I've never seen a one of them turn down 
a hug. For years they've come knocking on my door. 
They've come with a variety of bouquets. But their mes- 
sage has been no con. It has always been the message of 
grace! 

"God's love for you will never fail," sang out Sunday 
school teachers, Bible studiers, memorizers, quoters, lab 
schoolers, workshop and seminar presenters, lay wit- 
ness missioners, ecumenical institutioners, spirit-filled 
enthusiasts, growth groupers, counselors, pray-ers, dis- 
ciplers, equippers, worshipers, healers, deployers. I've 
opened my door to most all of them and have joined 




hands with many of them. 
Every one of them have 
helped give me muscle in my 
faith development. 

But in my Camelot exist- 
ence, I didn't know what to do 
with that muscle. So I just 
mainly snuggled down in 
blessedly-assured Christian 
comfort.. .until the diagnosis 
of cancer. I was jarred into an 
abrupt awakening. I was a 
wife and a mother of three 
young children. I had to sur- 
vive. 

One impossibly painful 
day, I instructed my husband. 
Jay, "Don't you dare let any- 
one come into our house to- 
day. No, not even Sybil." 
Do you think that stopped my faithful fi-iend? No 
way. I heard her gentle knock at my door, then here 
came her footsteps down the hall. 

"Doesn't she know the proper rules for visitation of 
the sick? She's probably going to have her Bible with 
her, too, all ready to fix me up." 

I turned my head to the wall as she tiptoed in. I 
heard her settle herself in my old rocking chair. And 
she started squeaking back and forth. ..back and forth. I 
lay motionless, angry, hurting, feeling all lost. Then I 
heard her rustle the pages of her weU-worn book and 
she began: 

"Why art thou cast down, my soul? Why art thou 
disquieted? 

Hope thou in God who is the health of thy counte- 
nance." 

"Be of good courage and he shall strengthen thy 
heart." 

"My heart and my flesh faileth, but God is the 
strength of my heart and my portion forever." 

On and on she went. At first, I didn't want to listen, 
but her voice was so gentle, so full of love, I couldn't re- 
sist. 

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the 
shadow of death, 

I will fear no evil for thou art with me. 
Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of 
mine enemies..." 

And at that point, something very unusual began 
happening within me. I sensed that my firiend was pre- 
paring the Lord's Table before me right there, at my 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



117 



bedside. It was as if she were holding out to me the 
bread of life, God's word made flesh in her flesh; the 
wine, aliveness, a new spirit, the promise of healing. 

I tm-ned to look into the eyes of my friend. And I re- 
member thinking: 'This is a high form of Holy Com- 
munion. I will take...! will eat." 

At that sacred moment, I determined in my heart 
that when I got up and out of that bed, I would have a 
single purpose in my life. I would seek to share that 
kind of Holy Communion — that love, that word, that 
presence of Christ — with others in whatever way God 
would lead me. 

It was certainly a clear summons to move from my 
previous, private Christian lifestyle to a deepening 
walk of covenant discipleship. 

I got well. Vastly different "flowergrams" started ar- 
riving at my front door. But this time it was, 'Thump, 
thump!" and "Bump, bump. ..bump, bump, bump!" 

"Who's that knocking at my door?" This time no 
rosy -cheeked lad. 

"It's the world come a'knocking with its motley bou- 
quet, the smelly brokenness of society with its values 
decay." 

I was faced with a decision. Do I dare open up or do I 
just say go away? I decided to open up and the unex- 
pected began happening. The messages I received at my 
door sent me scurrying out in all kinds of directions: to 
the University of Tulsa to become a certified mediator 
for dispute settlement out of court, to a women's con- 
cern center to become a counselor, to the Prison Pre-re- 
lease Center to help convicts learn basic life skills 
before their return to the community, and eventually to 
become a lay chaplain with the Tulsa Police Depart- 
ment. Faith and action certainly had begun to connect 
for me. 

And in October, 1971, my husband came home from 
his work at the hospital telling about the death of a lit- 
tle baby girl whose mother had battered her against 
the wall. Our reaction was anger, and horror, and then 
helplessness. 

How could such a violent act be prevented? So I be- 
gan looking around in Tulsa for an agency that could 
help a distraught parent who was losing emotional con- 
trol with her child. I couldn't find any. But I did find 
there were volunteers to help prevent animal abuse and 
neglect. 

So I decided to invite twenty-two friends to come to 
my house on Mondays. For five months on Mondays we 
researched, we invited experts in, and we had work- 
shops. From that small beginning in our den back in 
1972, we now have the Parent-Child Center of Tulsa 
with 31 professionals and many volunteers. 

A letter I received in the early days of my work has 
forever kept me motivated to continue. 
"Dear Ruby Parish: 

"I read about your work in the newspaper. I am now 
in my 70s and have never recovered from being an 
abused child. I refer to physical abuse, awakening in 
the night as a promised beating was always faithfully 
administered. One neighbor moved away, and I learned 
as an adult it was because of my pleas for mercy. It was 
more them they could stand. 



"In those days children had no organized help such 
as you have established in Tulsa. I have always felt a 
great deal of shame and have never told anyone of the 
horror of my childhood. Many were my mother's church 
activities and her leadership roles in charitable causes. 
Her favorite Bible verse was, 'Spare the rod and spoil 
the child.' 

"I should hate to reach Heaven were my mother 
there. The experience of my childhood did not die with 
her death. My mother had the loveliness of a madonna 
in the presence of others. Her facade was worthy of an 
Oscar. 

"My entire personality has been formed and shaped 
because of my childhood fears. In my old age, these 
memories are becoming more vivid. I pray you will be 
able to help parents stop hurting their children, but 
frankly, I don't know. As you see, I still feel shame and 
am imable to identify myself. 
"Sincerely, 
"An abused child at 76." 

In his book, A Place for You, Dr. Paul Toumier 
maintains that if any person is denied a place of love 
and security, then that person will become fixed, im- 
prisoned in that place of deprivation. He says, "All of us 
must receive before giving. We must exist before we 
can abandon ourselves in faith. Those two movements, 
giving and receiving, seem to correspond to the inevita- 
ble rhythm of life itself." 

Jesus described himself as the Son of man who had 
nowhere to lay his head. But remember, he had a 
mother full of grace, a father who was attentive to 
God's direction. There were plenty of brothers and sis- 
ters, and evidently Jesus enjoyed an extended family of 
relatives and friends. 

Maybe up until about the age of 30, Jesus had a 
great place to lay his head. He demonstrates for us how 
one stage in human development opens up the next. 

Many of us laity have found The United Methodist 
Church to be a great place to lay our heads. In it we 
find a warm, nurturing community. Together with our 
brothers and sisters it's easy to declare our Christian 
discipleship, especially on Sunday morning with a nice 
hot cup of coffee in our hands. 

It's that second movement that gets to be such a 
tough one for us: keeping our faithfulness in all our hu- 
man relationships. 

Loren Halvorson declares: 'There is no individual, 
private lifestyle for any of God's people. He says we are 
called to listen to those who shout out, 'the world needs 
the church for the healing of the world.' And we need to 
listen just as intently to those who shout, 'No, no, it's 
the other way around. The church needs the world for 
the healing of the church.'" 

Do you remember the words of Martin Luther King 
when he answered the critics of his poor people's march 
on Washington, D.C.? "We have brought Lazarus to the 
rich man's gate in order to save the soul of the rich 
man!" 

There's a church in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where both 
clergy and laity are convinced that opening up the 
gates of their church to make a place for others is the 
very heartbeat of that congregation. That church in- 



118 



May 7, 1992 



sists that the success of every ministry of that down- 
town congregation depends on how weU they move from 
the altar out into the street. 

One person describes this church as a "broker of hu- 
man resources," a place where people let God love them 
so well, that they become confident and capable of lov- 
ing and serving others. 

That church has a program called "Motivation for 
Ministry." How does it work? Simple. It only takes four 
people to respond to an identified community need for a 
ministry to begin. Of course, other persons are invited 
to join them. 

Here are some samplings of their laity involvement: 
a lively support group for Al Beck, who is now known in 
Tulsa as the Can Can Man. Al has a small sandwich 
shop a block and a half fi-om this downtown church. Be- 
sides his regular customers, each week Al serves as 
many as 800 street people with food he prepares on his 
2-bumer stove. At the start Al had been able to pay for 
all the give-away food by recycling aluminum cans for a 
penny apiece. But the needs finally exceeded his in- 
come. So Al called the church. 

"I've had my electricity turned off because I can't 
pay my bill. But I've got a great idea and I need you to 
help me. I want to collect one million aluminvmi cans. 
That would get me out of debt and would set me up to 
feed my friends for almost a year. Here's my plan. I 
want to rent a big billboard. I can get one for $100 a 
day. I'll climb up on that billboard and I'll stay there 
until Tulsa brings me one million cans. Will you back 
me up?" 

Of course they would. During those seven days on 
that billboard, Al Beck dodged tornadoes. One funnel 
cloud was actually seen passing high up over him. Birds 
came and pecked his face. One night robbers came and 
stole 40 bags of cans. But Al would not come down. 

Local radio and TV people came and interviewed 
him, and they just loved the song that he composed: 
"Mr. Can Man, bring him your cans." 

Construction workers became very concerned about 
Al's sleeping up so high, so they brought him a safety 
belt to wear. 

On May 20 the can count totaled 1,100,000, and Al 
Beck returned to earth. Though the church's "Food for a 
Friend" ministry knew it, in Tulsa it never became 
common knowledge that Al Beck, not so verj' many 
years ago, had been a street person himself. 

Twenty-five other ministries are offered by this con- 
gregation for those beyond the walls of the church. 
They include: dental and eye care clinics, legal counsel- 
ing services, an employment agency, prison ministry, 
tutoring, Jewish-Christian relations, a food co-op, finan- 
cial planning, family finendships with international 
students, tax help, support for families of the mentally 
ill, help for unwed mothers, prayer partners for the po- 
lice, and even a group called "Moving in the Spirit" for 
helping dislocated persons get themselves and their be- 
longings relocated. There is an aviation ministry with 
ten pilots who are on call for medical emergencies and 
missions. 



Not so very long ago. Special Ministries received a 
call fi-om a United Methodist clergy in Oceanside, Cali- 
fornia. 

This is what he said. "A fami ly fi-om my church here 
in Oceanside needs some help. They flew to Missouri for 
Diane's father's fimeral. After the services they loaded 
up her dad's van with things from his estate they 
wanted to keep. And they started for home. Just as they 
neared Tulsa, they had a devastating wreck that to- 
taled the van and sent all of them to the hospital. They 
are stranded there in Tulsa. Would there be some kind 
folk who would visit them? Maybe some of your mem- 
bers could help them gather up their belongings and 
ship them here to California." 

Not only did the church carefully pack their belong- 
ings, they provided daily pastoral care for this family as 
long as they were in the hospital. When they were re- 
leased. Special Ministries provided air travel for them 
to return to their home in California. 

You can imagine how the Tulsa United Methodist 
congregation loved the comment of the United Method- 
ist minister in Oceanside, California when he said: 
"Now, that's what I call connectionalism!" 

One special ministry has an active participant who 
doesn't even live in Tulsa. Sean Sellers lives on Death 
Row in the Oklahoma State Prison. Sean is in prison 
because he shot both his parents in the head while they 
were sleeping. Sean told authorities that those murders 
would never have happened had he not at that time 
been a practicing Satanist. While in prison, Sean com- 
mitted his life to Jesus Christ. 

The Greeting Card ministry of this church decided to 
design a very special card to send to Sean to tell him 
about God's unfaihng love and grace. And Sean's re- 
sponse to that card was absolutely astonishing. He 
wrote right back, and in no time at all, Sean, an artist 
himself, was regularly designing cards fi-om Death Row 
for the church. 

When a member of this congregation buys a new car, 
he can call the Used Car ministry. Mechanics will come 
right out, make any necessary repairs on the car, and 
pretty soon they will take that used car and give it to a 
breadwinner who can now have transportation to go to 
work. 

One day the director of the Southwater Home for 
Girls came to ask the church for a used van. There was 
not one available at that time. So immediately, right 
there in the office, they just gave it to the Lord in 
prayer. In the middle of their supplication, the tele- 
phone rang. The voice on the other end asked, "Could 
you possibly use a van in your Used Car Ministry? We 
have one our family wants to give you." 

Carlyle Mamey writes in his book, Priests to One 
Another, "No professional clergy can do what the 
church is called to do. The aim of the church is not to 
enlist laypersons in its services. The aim of the church 
is to put laypersons as theological competents out there 
in the service of the world. The answer is not a servant- 
hood of the laity as a nice addition to round out a hired 
professional staff. Instead, lay people must become the 
ministry of the church in the world." 



DaUy Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



119 



$ 



(continued from previous page) 

I believe that as we move firom private faith to public 
responsibility, we United Methodist laity are increas- 
ingly assuming our priesthood. It is a priesthood that 
believes in the redemption of the world not, the redemp- 
tion of the church. 

We need our clergy to help us discern theological di- 
mensions of community development and global aware- 
ness. We need help there. In our churches we need to 
provide experiences in education and mission and evan- 
gelism and proclamation and worship and stewardship 
in ways that create a ministering laity in every public 
responsibility. 

We laity give thanks for Covenant Discipleship 
groups that call us to accountability in our private lives 
and our daUy responsibilities. Each week, in the group 
that has met in our home, we have declared together, 
"Knowing that Jesus Christ died that I might have 
eternal life, I pledge myself to be his disciple, holding 
nothing back, but yielding all to the gracious initiatives 
of the Holy Spirit. I faithfully pledge my time, my 
skills, my resources, and my strength to search out 
God's will for me, and to obey." 

My brothers and sisters, we are not alone! In the bro- 
kenness, the violence, the dualism of this latter part of 
the 20th Century, we are compassed about with a great 
cloud of witnesses who have gone before us. As ex- 
pressed by the writer of the Letter to the Hebrews, 
'Though they be dead, through faith they speak." 

We hear the voices of saints and prophets resounding 
throughout history and echoing even today in this great 
auditorium. Those voices urge us, "Listen, listen, listen 
to the 'crackling of the fire of God within us and with- 
out us.'" 

Those voices of the faithful call out to us today to be- 
come ignited with the spark of the Holy Spirit as we 
participate in the ongoing, creative Kingdom of God! 

Here the words of Machtild of Magdeberg, Germany 
a remarkable young woman of the thirteenth century. 
If you love the justice of Jesus Christ more than you 
fear human judgment, then you will seek to do compas- 
sion. Compassion means that if I see my fi-iend and my 
enemy in equal need, I shall help both equally. Justice 
demands that we seek and find the stranger, the bro- 
ken, the prisoner and comfort them and offer them our 
help. Here lies the holy compassion of God. You asked 
me where God dwells. I will tell you, there is no Lord in 
the whole world who lives in all his dwellings at once, 
except God alone. God has enough of all good things ex- 
cept one, of conununion with humans God can never 
have enough. And behold that Lord, God of the whole 
world stands right here at our door in Louisville, KY to- 
day and knocks, promising holy communion to anyone 
who hears and opens the door I will come in; I will 
break bread with you. As the father has sent me, I now 
send you forth, in my name to break bread with others. 
Our joyous response today, Even so come Lord Jesus, 
Amen. 



Audio- and Videotapes Available 

Audio- and videotapes of key conference addresses 
and personal selections of events during plenary ses- 
sions may be purchased at the Cokesbury Resource 
Center, according Pat Correll, Vice President of Cus- 
tomer and Distribution Services. 

Tape production and distribution is a cooperative 
project of United Methodist Communications and The 
United Methodist Publishing House. Customized dupli- 
cation of personal selections for either audio- or vide- 
otapes is a new service. 

A single audiotape recording of both the Episcopal 
Address and the Laity Address is priced at $7.00. It will 
be available about 24 hours after the addresses are de- 
livered. 

A customized audiotape of personally selected events 
during plenary sessions may be purchased at $9.00 per 
unit. The length of this custom tape may be up to 60 
minutes. 

Videotapes of the Laity Address and Episcopal Ad- 
dress are each $25. A post-conference summary vide- 
otape also is available for $25. A customized videotape 
up to 60 minutes in length is priced at $30. 

Delivery of tapes may be specified for pickup at the 
Cokesbury Resource Center during General Conference 
or for home delivery by mail. Audiotapes are expected 
to be available next day, but videotapes of segments 
filmed during the first week of the conference will be- 
come available about the middle of the second week. 
Tapes recorded during the last day or so of the confer- 
ence will require home delivery by mail. Mail delivery 
normally requires up to two weeks, Correll said, and in- 
volves a $2.50 shipping and handling charge on each or- 
der. 

Tape orders may be placed at the special display 
Cokesbury Resource Center. This display is located 
near the red exit doors about midway toward the cafete- 
ria. Customers also may inquire at the check-out 
counter near the entrance. 

When ordering customized tapes, customers are 
asked to specify clearly the event or person, day, and in- 
clusive time so technicians can accurately record the de- 
sired segment. 

— Thomas J. Potter 



Correction 

The story titled "Racial Ethnic Delegate Orienta- 
tion" (page 76, May 6 DCA) erroneously listed sponsor- 
ship. The orientation was cosponsored by the 
Inter-Ethnic Strategy Development Group and the Gen- 
eral Commission on Religion and Race. We regret the 
error. 



120 



May 7, 1992 



Jail or the DCA? 




Juanita Bennenfant received about two dozen calls intended for 
the local jail. 

Scene: Sales office of the Daily Christian Advocate. 

Time: Early morning, first day of Generjd Confer- 
ence. 

"I want to know when you will let him out," asks the 
caller. 

"Out of what?" replies Juanita Bellenfant, DCA 
sales manager. 



"Don't you have him locked up down there?" comes a 
quizzical and somewhat tentative response. 

And so it went for about two dozen calls by con- 
cerned friends and relatives of the incarcerated of Lou- 
isville and Jefferson County whose dialing connected 
them with the DCA sales office (5884121) instead of 
the local jail (588-2142). 

Perplexed by the growing volume of misdirected 
calls, Bellenfant, a United Methodist Publishing House 
staff member, turned to South Central Bell for an ex- 
planation. 

Soon the sales office line went dead as telephone 
technicians deactivated the number. No more number, 
no more calls. 

Neat solution? Maybe. Certainly helpful for Bellen- 
fant and her team who process sales of the daily Gen- 
eral Conference publication and distribute about 4,000 
copies each day. 

If you are not reading the Daily Christian Advocate 
each morning, see Bellenfant or her associates at the 
sales desk near the Cokesbury Resource Center en- 
trance. A subscription to all daily issues is $38 if you 
pick up issues here each morning or $48.50 mailed to 
your home after the conference. A single copy of the 
Roundup Edition is $2; (includes postage) 10 or more 
copies, $1.50 each, mailed to your address. Delegates re- 
ceive complimentary copies daily at their desks and a 
copy of the Roundup Edition mailed to their homes. 

— Tom Potter 



Global Ministries Sets '93 Gathering 

Five thousand United Methodists are expected to at- 
tend the second Global Gathering, sponsored by the 
General Board of Global Ministries, in Indianapolis, 
March 25-28, 1993. 

The first highly successful Global Gathering took 
place at the Gait House here in March 1987. Bishop 
Desmond Tutu of South Africa was the keynote speaker. 

Speakers from Africa, Asia and Latin America will 
be featured. The Rev. Zan Holmes of St. Luke United 
Methodist Church, Dallas, will preach at the opening 
worship service. A global village, inspiring worship 
services, Bible study, and great singing are some of the 
highlights of the three-day celebration. The theme is 
"Called by the Spirit." 

For additional information and registration, write to 
Rena Yocum, (^neral Board of Global Ministries, The 
United Methodist Church, 475 Riverside Drive, New 
York, N.Y. 10115. 



— Betty Thompson. 



Today's Book Autographing 
Sessions 

Visit the Cokesbury Resource Center in the con- 
vention center, buy a book, and have it signed by the 
author during autographing sessions. Authors, book 
titles, and "signing" times for today are: 

The Rev. Maxie D. Dunnam, 2-2:30 p.m. 

Alive in Christ 

Jesus Claims — Our Promises 

Living the Psalms (hardcover and paper) 

That's What the Man Said 

The Workbook on Coping as Christians 

The Workbook of Intercessory Prayer 

The Workbook of Living Prayer 

The Workbook on Spiritual Disciplines 

The Workbook on the Christian Walk 

The Rev. J. Ellsworth Kalas, 7 p.m. 
Parables from the Backside 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



121 



General Conference Has Seen "Red" Since 1960 



A R. H. "Red" Bond says he represents "the rough ele- 

ment" of The United Methodist Church. At General 
Conference for his ninth consecutive time, Red was first 
elected to the 1960 General Conference. 

Tall and gregarious, Bond attributes his popularity 
here and in the Memphis Conference to his visibility 
and his humor. A certified lay speaker, Red has been in 
every local church in his annual conference. He has 
served in every lay office, including president of the 
conference United Methodist Men, and district and con- 
ference lay leader. He's also spoken in nearly half of 
the districts south of the Mason-Dixon line and in many 
north of it. 

His hobby, designing and making antique oak repro- 
ductions, also attracts folks to Red. He showed me a 
replica he made of a gavel that Francis Asbury carried 
in his saddlebag. Cokesbury has some of his gavels and 
mite boxes available during this General Conference. 
The original is in the Tennessee Conference Archives. 
As I spoke with Bond, he was approached to make a 
family altar, one of his favorite pieces. 

Red Bond graduated fi-om high school at age 17 on a 
Friday and started climbing telephone poles for the 
Bell Telephone Company the following Monday. He 
worked for the company for 42 years. He did his "post- 
graduate work" in the U.S. Marine Corps and served in 
the most decorated outfit in the South Pacific in World 
War II. 

Retired now for 13 years, he is still active. A mem- 
ber of First United Methodist Church in Dyersburg, 
Tennessee, Red currently serves as a lay member of the 
Memphis Annual Conference. He teaches a men's Bible 
study in Sunday school and serves on the administra- 
tive board. He attends a men's prayer breakfast every 
Wednesday at 6:30 a.m. It's easy for him to make. He 
gets up at 4 a.m. and has attended the breakfast for 
thirty-two years with forty-five to fifty men. 

Red grew up in a four-point circuit. All his fore-bear- 
ers were farmers. He said God got his attention in a fox- 
hole halfway around the world. He says, "Don't promise 
God something you won't do." He's kept his promise by 
actively challenging laity to support the church and its 
clergy for thirty-six years. 

Bond declined to name a favorite General Confer- 
ence. He says that he sees God at work as the confer- 




R.H. "Red" Bond (center) holds one of his gavel replicas in the 
Cokesbury Resource Center. Patricia Meyers, marshal and DCA 
writer, holds a mite box. Bill Turner of the Cokesbury Resource 
Center stands by. 

ence makes the great decisions that need to be made. 
'Tm a Methodist. I love the [United] Methodist Church 
and what it's trying to do." The biggest change that 
he's seen since 1960 is the increasing participation of 
women and the church finally utilizing their talents. 
He says that women have been the biggest influence on 
his life. He and his wife. Precious, have been married 
fifty-two years. They have two daughters of whom he is 
most proud. 

Red's recommendation for first timers at General 
Conference: "patience and participation." For further 
insights. Red Bond is easy to find. He's tall, has a wide 
smile, and comes naturally by the name "Red." 



■ Patricia Meyers 



Cokesbury's Autographing Booth 

Come by to greet and give support to these United Methodist authors! 
Check daily postings throughout the Cokesbury display and the Daily Christian Advocate for scheduled appearances. 

Signings by: 
Grant S. Shockley • Anne Broyles • Art Guillermo • Tom Tozer • Maxie Dunnam • James Thomas • Homer Noley • Donald E. Messer 

J. Ellsworth Kalas • William Hinson • Kenneth Carder • George Hunter, III • Robert 0. Morgan • Earl G. Hunt, Jr. • James A. Harnish 
Charles Yngoyen • Bruce Hilton • Robert Spam • Zan Holmes • Eddie Fox • Kenneth Kinghorn • Maqone Kimbrough 

Michael Ripski • James Moore 



122 



May 7, 1992 



Announcements 



If your voting pad displays a number or a word when 
you cast your vote, your vote has been recorded! 
*•* 

Reserve delegates must have completed seating 
permit forms from the chairperson of their delegation 
La order to be seated in legislative committees or 
plenary sessions. Additional forms may be secured in 
the Secretaiy's Office, room 103. 
**• 

Speakers during plenary sessions are requested to 
review verbatim transcriptions appearing in the DCA. 
Substantial corrections should be communicated to 
the Committee on Journal by noon for the current 
day's DCA. Corrections may be sent to H. Sharon 
Howell, Kansas East C-8, or to the Conference 
Secretaiy's office, room 103. 



Perkins' alums and friends 
breakfast will be held 
Thursday, May 7, 7:00 - 8:00 
a.m., at the Hyatt Regency. 
Cost: $10, speaker: Bishop 
James S. Thomas. 



< 



No Drinking in the Bar 



"Casting Out Fear: Reconciling Ministries with 
Gay/Lesbian United Methodists," a video that 
examines the pain and estrangement of gay and 
lesbian Christians and provides steps that UMs are 
taking to enable ministries of reconciliation among 
persons of differing sexual orientations, will be shown 
on Thursday, May 7, at 12:45 p.m. Days Inn, 101 E. 
Jefferson, room 615. A sandwich lunch will be 
available for $5. 

**• 

Bishop Abel T. Muzorewa will be interviewed on 
"Sunrise Today," WAVE-TV, Channel 3 (NBC) at 
6:00 a.m, Friday, May 8. 

*•* 

The Iowa Conference luncheon will be held at Kunz's 
Restaurant, 12:00 noon, Friday, May 8. Iowa 
delegates, reserve delegates, pages, and marshals are 

invited. Contact Don 
Mendenhall, C-18, for 
more information. 



Members of the "Message to 
the Nation" writing committee 
will meet tonight (May 7) at 
9:30 p.m. in room 114 of the 
Convention Center. 



The Institute on Religion and Democracy wUl sponsor 
an issues forum on "Peace and Human Rights in the 
Islamic World" Thursday, May 7, 12:45, Sampson 
Room, 1st floor. Gait House East. The speakers will 
be Habib Malik from Catholic University of America 
and Mia Adjali, Executive Secretary UN/International 
Affairs, Women's Division. 
*** 

World Methodist Council luncheon will be held 
Thursday, May 7, 12:40 p.m.. Regency Ballroom, 
Hyatt Regency. 

•** 

Afternoon worship services begin with a pre-service 
concert each day at 2:00 p.m. with worship at 2:30 
p.m. in the sanctuary of Trinity UMC, Third and 
Guthrie Streets. 



The General Conference OfTice has declared 
there shall be no drinks in the bar: 
"AH delegates should refrain from taking 
beverages within the bar of the conference 
due to the presence of electrical wiring," says 
a statement from the conference ofTice. 



An informal discussion 
on 21st century issues 
facing The United 
Methodist Church will 
be held Saturday, May 9, 
7:00 - 8:00 a.m, Gait 
House East, 2nd floor. 
Governor Room #1. 
(Free continentEil 

breakfast for delegates.) Sponsored by Erwin UMC, 
Syracuse, New York. Contact Irving Hill, Gait House, 
to attend. The 6% of clergy delegates age 40 and 
under are especially encouraged to attend. 
••• 

The trustees and the president of Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary invite you and your guest to 
dinner on Saturday, May 9, at 5:45 p.m., Hyatt 
Regency, second floor ballroom, $12.50 per person. 
Advance reservation only. 
*** 

Methodist Theological School in Ohio breakfast will 
be held Monday, May 11, 7 a. m. in the Brown Room, 
Gait House East. Reservations needed by 5:00 p.m. 
today. Contact C. Joseph Sprague, section B, row 3, 
seat 12 or President "Ned" Dewire, Gait House. Cost 
is $10. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



123 



I 



The Arkansas Area luncheon will be held at the Day's 
Inn on Monday, May 1 1. 

**• 

Urgent Notice: In recognition of the General 
Conference "Fast" in effect through Friday morning, 
the niff breakfast has been changed from Friday, May 
8 to Saturday, May 9 at 7:00 a.m., in the Keeneland 
Suite on the Mezzanine Level of the Hyatt Regency. 
To cancel, contact Don Messer. 
••• 

The Reference Committee will meet in room 114 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, noon to 1:30 p.m. 

••• 

Inter-Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy will 
meet in room 114 Saturday, May 9 at 4:30 p.m. 
•** 

You are invited to a "Global Gathering '93," March 
25-28, 1993, Indianapolis, Ind. Come hear speakers, 
participate in workshops, sing, and worship in a truly 



international gathering of United Methodists. For 
registration information, write to: Global Gathering 
'93, c/o Service Center, General Board of Global 
Ministries, 7820 Reading Road, Caller No. 1800, 
Cincinnati, OH 45222-1800. 
••• 

The Methodist Peace Fellowship breakfast will be 
held Wednesday, May 13, 7:00 - 8:20 a.m., Miller's 
Cafeteria, 429 South 2nd Street. No ticket necessary. 
Featured speakers: Schuyler Rhodes, Washington 
Square UMC, New York; John Swomley, St. Paul 
School of Theology (emeritus), Kansas City; Mattie 
Jones, Fellowship of Reconciliation, Nyack, New 
York For more information contact: Jean Edwards 
458-8056. 

•*• 

Information about investment and loan opportunities 
is available at the hospitality suite of the United 
Methodist Development Fimd, Gait House, Executive 
Offices, East Wing. 




Cokesbury 

Booka -f Bibles -l- Church Supplies 

INVITES YOU TO MEET: 



Donald Messer 

Author Oft 

Send Me? 

A Conspiracy of Goodness 

Contemporary Images 

Of Christianty 

Autographing booka 

Thursday, May 7 

1:30 - 2:00 



Homer Noley 

Author Oft 

First White Frost 
Autographing books 

Thursday, May 7 

11:30 -Noon 



^»T"04 




••«.»•• "^ 



Maxie Dunnam 

Author Oft 

Workbook On the Christian Walk 
and others 

Autographing booka 
Thursday, May 7 

2:00 - 2:30 

An signings held in the 
Cokesbury Display 



*»*^ ♦^o. 




"fisviv' 



124 



May 7, 1992 



Petitions Trivia 



By Tom Potter 



Individual United Methodists submitted the largest 
portion of the 2,433 petitions which will fuel the legisla- 
tive process during the next 10 days. 

Nearly 26 percent of the petitions are sponsored by 
individuals, an informal review of the petition list re- 
vealed. The list is based on data supplied by the peti- 
tion secretary. 

Another 22 percent of the petitions originated with 
general boards and agencies, the Council of Bishops, 
and General Conference task forces and special commit- 
tees. About 19 percent of the petitions arose in aimual 
conferences or their sub-units. Small groups at various 
levels of the church produced abut 16 percent of the pe- 
titions. Local church administrative boards, councils 
and charge/church conferences developed approxi- 
mately 10 percent of the appeals, and the remaining 7 
percent came from advocacy groups and caucuses. 

Although the current volume of petitions is about 9 
percent less than the quantity received at the last con- 
ference, the flood of paper near deadline still over- 
whelmed Odell Thompson of Beloit, WI. As petition 
secretary, she read each petition, numbered it, assigned 
it to a legislative committee, recorded it on the com- 
puter, and transmitted it to the Committee on Refer- 
ence for review and referral. 

'This was my first involvement in such a process," 
chuckled Thompson, recently retired from a 25-year ca- 
reer with a national retail chain. "I had no idea of what 
I was getting into when I volunteered for this job!" 

Among the most active individual petitioners are 
Leonard D. Slutz, a member of Hyde Park Community 
Church, Cincinnati, OH; the Rev. Jerry Eckert, pastor 
of Emmaus Church, Milwaukee, WI; and Dr. Maxie D. 
Dunnam, pastor of Christ Church, Memphis, TN. Slutz 
submitted 40 petitions; Eckert, 33; and Dunnam, 30. 

"Every once in a while I see something I think 
should be corrected," explained Slutz, 79, a practicing 
attorney and a veteran petitioner. "It may not be some- 
thing so terribly important, but I believe we should 
brush up the Discipline, keep it up-to-date and make it 
accurate." 

Slutz said his petitions focus on improvements in the 
judicial process, establishing general agency member- 
ship at more appropriate sizes, and providing for ade- 
quate representation of conferences outside the United 
States and Puerto Rico. Slutz served as a General Con- 
ference lay delegate from the West Ohio Conference 
from 1952 through 1968, and as a member of the Judi- 
cial Council 1972-80. His experiences, he explained, 
have helped him identify areas for improved effective- 
ness, greater efficiency and sharper expense control. 

"I want to help the church establish a responsible 
grievance procedure that protects the rights of the 
churches, the individuals and the alleged victims," Eck- 
ert, 57, said. His 33 petitions plead for due process in 
charges against ministers, a clarified leave of absence 



procedure and sensitivity to potential legal liability in 
ministerial counseling. Other petitions call for greater 
sensitivity on the part of the clergy leadership and "line 
item" identification in conference budgets. And one pe- 
tition offers a "list of sins comparable with homosexual- 
ity," according to biblical references. 

Elimination of the Greneral Coxmcil on Ministries 
and assumption of its basic responsibilities by the 
Coxmcil of Bishops is the thrust of 30 petitions submit- 
ted by Dunnam, 57, one of the organizers of the na- 
tional coalition of United Methodist leaders who issued 
the "Memphis Declaration." Author of several books 
and publications, Dunnam also serves as a television 
teacher and evangelist as well as senior minister of 
Christ Chxirch. From 1975 through 1982, he was world 
editor of The Upper Room. 

The churches in Alaska, Maryland and Louisiana 
were among the most active congregations submitting 
petitions through charge/church conferences, adminis- 
trative boards and councils on ministries. 

"We hope to make the general church more respon- 
sive to the grassroots and to increase the ability of the 
grassroots to impact the general church," said Rev. 
George Anderson, 58, Mount Oak Church, 
Mitchellville, MD. 

Now 110 years old, Mount Oak Chiu-ch is a 550- 
member, growing congregation of young families in a 
"bedroom community" not far from the nation's capital. 
Through its administrative board have come 13 peti- 
tions supporting a pro-life stand on abortion, limitation 
of board membership size, University Senate reform, 
regular evaluation of seminaries, detailed data on 
World Service and conference benevolences, review of 
ministerial candidates regarding church doctrine, and 
elimination of three general agencies (General Council 
on Ministries, General Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women and General Commission on Christian 
Unity and Interreligious Concerns). "Many of our peti- 
tions are adapted from positions of the Good News 
movement," Anderson concluded. 

St. Paul Church is a congregation of less than 100 
members near Fairbanks in Alaska's Yukon River 
country. The 12 petitions authorized by St. Paul's ad- 
ministrative board address inclusive language, restric- 
tions against further study of homosexuality and any 
other matter "the Bible identifies as sinful," and a re- 
quirement that general agency proclamations include a 
disclaimer that only General Conference officially 
speaks for the denomination. St. Paul petitions also fo- 
cus on a new task force on children, nationwide health 
insurance and voluntary apportionments. 

Downsville Church, a congregation of 109 members 
in a small Louisiana community east of Shreveport, ex- 
pressed its concerns in 11 petitions advocating changes 
in annual conference membership and voting rights, 
withdrawal from the denomination by a congregation 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



125 



t 



(continued from p. 124) 

with its property, withholding apportionments, ministe- 
rial compensation based on merit rather than seniority 
and appointment of more "non-seminary" pastors. 
Downsville Church also petitioned for a constitutional 
change to bar avowed homosexuals from the ordained 
ministry, and removal of any clergy person knowingly 
appointing or endorsing an avowed homosexual for the 
ministry. 

Among petition generators beyond the local church, 
the Minnesota, Detroit and California-Nevada confer- 
ences led the count with 31, 28 and 19 petitions respec- 
tively. Overseas conferences petitioning the conference 
are Zaire, the four German conferences, Muri Provi- 
sional Conference in Nigeria, North Shaba and Sweden. 

Most active petitioners among the general boards 
and agencies are GBOD (74), GBHM (65) and GCFA 
(50). GBOD petitions cover a range of issues including 
laity organizational matters and a proposed Spanish- 
language hymnal. 

"Any organization, ordained minister or lay mem- 
ber.. .may petition the General Conference," states the 
Book of Discipline. This time many chose to do that, ap- 
parently with faith in the democratic process, hope of 
approval by the assembly and love for those who prob- 
ably will disagree. 



Bestsellers at Cokesbury 

Business has been brisk at the Cokesbury Resource 
Center, reports manager Bill Turner. Souvenirs, gifts, 
and robes were among the most sought-after items dur- 
ing the first two days of General Conference. Turner 
commented that robes were popular especially with 
non-US delegates. 

Delegates also have been buying books. According to 
an unofficial sxirvey by Turner, the bestselling books so 
far at this General Conference have been — in no par- 
ticular order — 

* Listening to Your Life: Daily Meditations With Fre- 
derick Buechner, by Frederick Buechner 

* The Frog in the Kettle: What Christians Need to 
Know About Life in the Year 2000, by George Barna 

* also by George Barna, User Friendly Churches: 
What Christians Need to Know About the Churches Peo- 
ple Love to God tq 

* Racing Toward 2001: The Forces Shaping Amer- 
ica's Religious Future, by Russell Chandler 

* Street Singing & Preaching: A Book of New 
Psalms, by Martin Bell, author of The Way of the Wolf 

* The Storyteller's Companion to the Bible: Exodus- 
Joshua, Michael E. Williams, editor 

* two books from a new imprint. Dimensions for Liv- 
ing: Is There Life After Stress?, by James W. Moore; and 
How to Stay Alive As Long as You Live: Practical 
Guides for Christian Living, by Robert H. Spain 

* The Power of Holy Habits: A Discipline for Faithful 
Discipleship, by William H. Hinson 

* Yes, Lord, I Have Sinned But I Have Several Excel- 
lent Excuses, by James W. Moore 

* Vision 2000: Planning for Ministry into the Next 
Century, by Joe A. Harding and Ralph W. Mohney 



- Keith Kendall 



To hear '*"••. ^^^'''^'s 3-minute daily synopsis of 
General Conference, call the Church Hotline toll- 
free, 1-800-645-1661. At any time during the 
message, press 7 to hear the synopsis. For 
information about using Church Hotline in your 
church, come by the Church Hotline booth in the 
Cokesbury Display. 




126 



May 7, 1992 



Petitions Referred 



From 


Pet* 


Para.# 


To 


Pet.# 


Para.* 


DI 


12339 


3000R 


FM 


12339 


3000R 


FM 


12356 


3000R 


FM 


12356 


007 ID 


MN 


10425 


0418D 


GJ 


10425 


0418D 


MN 


11416 


0440D 


GJ 


11416 


0440D 


MN 


10436 


0440D 


GJ 


10436 


0440D 


MN 


10440 


0448D 


GJ 


10440 


0448D 


MN 


10956 


0448D 


GJ 


10956 


0448D 


MN 


11342 


0448D 


GJ 


11342 


0448D 


MN 


11587 


0448D 


GJ 


11587 


0448D 


MN 


12193 


0448D 


GJ 


12193 


0448D 


MN 


10168 


0448D 


GJ 


10168 


0448D 


MN 


10443 


0450D 


GJ 


10443 


0450D 


MN 


11447 


0451D 


GJ 


11447 


0451D 


MN 


11997 


0451D 


GJ 


11997 


0451D 


MN 


11590 


0453D 


GJ 


11590 


0453D 


MN 


11637 


0453D 


GJ 


11637 


0453D 


MN 


11694 


0453D 


GJ 


11694 


0453D 


MN 


11896 


0453D 


GJ 


11896 


0453D 


MN 


11897 


0453D 


GJ 


11897 


0453D 


MN 


10027 


0453D 


GJ 


10027 


0453D 


MN 


10254 


0453D 


GJ 


10254 


0453D 


MN 


10446 


0453D 


GJ 


10446 


0453D 


MN 


11343 


0453D 


GJ 


11343 


0453D 


MN 


11422 


0453D 


GJ 


11422 


0453D 


MN 


11985 


0453D 


GJ 


11985 


0453D 


MN 


12046 


0453D 


GJ 


12046 


0453D 


MN 


12430 


0453D 


GJ 


12430 


0453D 


MN 


12245 


0453D 


GJ 


12245 


0453D 


MN 


10452 


0513D 


GJ 


10452 


0513D 


MN 


10846 


0513D 


GJ 


10846 


0513D 


MN 


11022 


0513D 


GJ 


11022 


0513D 


MN 


11448 


0513D 


GJ 


11448 


0513D 


GM 


10212 


0742D 


GM 


10212 


0742D 


GM 


12276 


0742D 


DI 


12276 


0742D 


GM 


12277 


0755D 


DI 


12277 


0755D 


GM 


11717 


3000R 


$GM 


11717 


3000R$ 


GM 


11855 


3000R 


$GM 


11855 


3000R$ 


HE 


11975 


1505D 


MN 


11975 


1505D 


HE 


11772 


3000M$ 


FM 


11772 


3000M 


HE 


11771 


3000M$ 


FM 


11771 


3000M 


IC 


10839 


OOOOD 


CO 


10839 


OOOOD 


IC 


10556 


075 ID 


CO 


10556 


0751D 


IC 


10314 


074 ID 


DI 


10314 


074 ID 


IC 


11309 


3000R 


LC 


11309 


3000R 


CS 


10967 


3000R 


IC 


10967 


3000R 


GJ 


12308 


3000R 


IC 


12308 


3000R 


CS 


12421 


3000M 




DELETION 


CS 


11064 


3000R 




DELETION 



From 


Pet.# 


Para.# 


CS 


12209 


3000R 


CS 


12411 


007 ID 


CS 


12400 


007 ID 


CO 


10360 


3000M 


DI 


11467 


3000M 


FM 


12357 


3000R 


FM 


12346 


3000R 


FM 


12375 


3000R 


HE 


11096 


3000R 


HE 


11661 


1503D 


HE 


11975 


1505D 


HE 


10349 


3000R 


LC 


10234 


2543D 


LC 


10224 


0225D 


LC 


11173 


0225D 


LC 


11169 


0106D 


LC 


11099 


0106D 


LC 


10132 


0106D 


LC 


11099 


0106D 


LC 


11171 


0216D 


LC 


12036 


0216D 


LC 


10135 


0209D 


LC 


10136 


0216D 


LC 


11124 


0263D 


LC 


10070 


0247D 


CO 


11906 


3000R 


LC 


11578 


0221D 


LC 


11869 


0221D 


LC 


11529 


0221D 


LC 


10032 


0221D 


LC 


10034 


0223D 


LC 


10033 


0222D 


LC 


10035 


0224D 


LC 


10223 


0224D 


LC 


11172 


0224D 


LC 


12179 


0224D 


CS 


12400 


007 ID 


MN 


12250 


3000 


CO 


11810 


3000R 


CO 


11704 


3000R 


CO 


12253 


3000M 


CO 


10660 


0422 


LC 


10222 


0216 


LC 


10839 


0000 


HE 


11722 


3000R 


CC 


10997 


0647D 


CC 


10998 


0647D 


CC 


10999 


0647D 


CC 


11754 


0653D 


CC 


11956 


0653D 



To 


Pet. # 


Para.* 


FM 


12209 


3000R 




DELETION 


CO 


12400 


3000R 


FA 


10360 


3000M 




DELETION 


FM 


12357 


007 ID 


FM 


12346 


007 ID 


FM 


12375 


007 ID 




DELETION 


GJ 


11661 


1503D 


MN 


11975 


1505D 


LC 


10349 


3000R 




INVATJD 


FM 


10224 


0225D 


FM 


11173 


0225D 


FM 


11169 


0106D 


FM 


11099 


0106D 


FM 


10132 


0106D 


FM 


11099 


0106D 


FM 


11171 


0216D 


FM 


12036 


0217D 


FM 


10135 


0209D 


FM 


10136 


0216D 


LC 


11124 


3000R 


FA 


10070 


0247D 


IC 


11906 


3000R 


FM 


11578 


022 ID 


FM 


11869 


022 ID 


FM 


11529 


022 ID 


FM 


10032 


022 ID 


FM 


10034 


0223D 


FM 


10033 


0222D 


FM 


10035 


0224D 


FM 


10223 


0224D 


FM 


11172 


0224D 


FM 


12179 


0224D 


CS 


12400 


3000R 




INVALID 


CS 


11810 


3000R 


LC 


11704 


3000R 




INVALID 


GJ 


10660 


0422D 


FM 


10222 


0216D 


CO 


10839 


OOOOD 


HE 


11722 


3000R$ 


IC 


10997 


0647D 


IC 


10998 


0647D 


IC 


10999 


0647D 


IC 


11754 


0653D 


IC 


11956 


0653D 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



127 



New or Corrected Petitions 
to the 1992 General Conference 



636. 



Painion Number = 00-12444-0636-0; Oouncll al Bishop*. 



Include South Africa in the Listing of 
Africa Central Conferences. 

At the request of South Africa United Methodists, a 
district has been established in that country. We 
recommend the inclusion of South Africa in the hsting 
of countries included in the Africa Central Conference 
(11636.3(a)). 



Petition Number = CC-12445-3000-M$; Northern Europe Central 
Conference Council of Bisiiops and GBGU. 

Increase Number of Bishops in Northern 
Europe Central Conference From One to 
Two. 

In order to provide for United Methodist mission 
into the Commonwealth of Independent States through 
the full-time and continuous supervision by a bishop of 
the church, 

Be it resolved that the Northern Europe Central 
Conference be authorized to elect an additional bishop 
for one quadrennium for the sole purpose of giving 
oversight to the mission of The United Methodist 
Church in the Commonwealth of Independent States. 



Petition Number - CC-12446-3000-MS; West Africa Central Conference. 

Increase Number of Bishops From Three 
to Four to Provide for the Work of Nigeria. 

To provide supervision for the rapid growth in 
Nigeria, be it resolved that the number of bishops in the 
West Africa Central Conference be increased from 
three to four. 



Petition Number - GJ- 12443-0004-13; James G. and Dorothy O'Quinn, 
United Metliodlst Clergy Couples, Chesapeake, VA. 

Inclusiveness of the Church. 

Amend 10004: 

...Therefore, all persons, without regard to race, 
color, national origin, status, or economic condition, 
shall be eUgible.... In The United Methodist Church no 



conference or other organizational unit of the Church 
shall be structured so as to exclude any member of any 
constituent body of the Church because of race, color, 
national origin, status, or economic condition. 



PelHIon Number = HE-12436-3000; R 

Training and Recruitment of Ethnic 
Minority Persons. 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church supports 
the pubUc education system in America and realizes 
that in an ever changing society "Excellence in 
Education" can be achieved with proper nourishing. 
Church, community and federal government 
involvement is imperative if the current trend in public 
education is to be reversed; 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church believes 
that every person has a right to an education and it is 
society's responsibility to enable every person to obtain 
this right; 

Whereas, The United Methodist Church believes in 
universal pubUc education and supports public 
educational institutions; 

Whereas, individuals have the right and freedom to 
inquire, discuss, and teach regulated by self-discipline of 
scholarship and good judgment; 

Be it resolved, that the California-Nevada Annual 
Conference encourage the local churches to establish 
learning enrichment centers and tutors who can provide 
supplementary instructions for students to ensure 
academic excellence according to his/her potential; 

Be it resolved, that the California-Nevada Annual 
Conference support the training and recruitment of 
qualified ethnic minority teachers that will serve as 
positive role models for ethnic minority students; 

Be it further resolved, that the California-Nevada 
Annual Conference Board of Higher Education be 
directed to establish and recommend means of funding 
additional scholarship funds for ethnic minority persons 
to assist in funding the educational efforts of ethnic 
minority persons. 

Be it finally resolved, that the California-Nevada 
Conference petitions the General Conference to: 

1. Encourage all local churches to establish learning 
enrichment centers and tutors who can provide 
supplementary instruction for students to ensure 
academic excellence according to each one's potential; 



128 



May 7, 1992 



2. Support the training and recruitment of qualified 
ethnic minority teachers that will serve as positive role 
models for ethnic minority students; 

3. Direct the General Board of Higher Education 
and Ministry to seek additional funding for scholarships 
for ethnic minority persons. 



251 



• Pelition Number = LC- 10071 -25 1-D; NAK. 



Duties of Lay Church Leader. 

Amend 1251.1: 

c) Membership in the Charge Conference and the 
Administrative Council (or the Administrative Board 
and the Council on Ministries), the Committee on 
Finance, and the Committee on Nominations and 
Personnel, where, along with the pastor, the lay leader 
shall serve as an interpreter of the actions and programs 
of the Annual Conference and the general Church (to 
be better equipped to comply with this responsibility it 
is recommended that the lay leader also serve as the 
Lay Member of Annual Conference); 



269. 



Pelition Number - LC-1 2435-0269; G BOD. 



Membership of the Committee 
of Pastor- Parish Relations. 

Amend 11269.2: 

There shall be a Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations (Staff-Parish Relations) of not fewer than five 
nor more than nine lay persons representative of the 
total charge. One of the five to nine persons shall be a 
young adult. One of the five to nine persons may be a 
senior high youth. In addition to the five to nine persons ;- 
a lay mcmbcf of Annual CoBfc r cncc shall also be a 
member. All shall be members of the local church or 
charge except where Central Conference legislation 
provides otherwise. No staff member or immediate 
family member of a pastor or staff member may serve on 
the committee. In addition to the five to nine persons, 
a lay member of Annual Conference shall also be a 
member. If a person inehgible to serve on the committee 
is elected as lay member to Annual Conference end- 
there is no other elected lay member to the Annual 
Conference available to serve, the vacancy will be filled 
upon election by the Charge Conference foUo'i ^ ing the 
nomination of the Committoo on Nominations and 
Poroonnol then the committee shall consist of the five to 
nine persons only. 

la) The members, including the chairperson, shall be 
elected by the Charge Conference upon nomination by 
the Committee on Nominations and Personnel. In order 



to secure experience and stability, the membership (not 
including the lay member of Annual Conference) shall 
be divided into three classes, one of which shall be ^ 

elected each year for a three year term. ^ 



The Ministerial Pension Plan, 

Petition Number. FA-1 1685-3000-R; Thomas H. Griffith, CA-Pacific 
Confererxw. Advance Edition Page 1171. 

Amend Section 4.7 of the Ministerial Pension Plan 
Document (Advance Edition I, pages 409-410: 

. is less than $1,750; or with that vested former 
participant's written consent if the amount is more than 
$1,750, but less than three-fourths one - fourth of the. . . 



Petition Number MN-12193-0448-D; Thomas H. Griffith, CA-Pacific 
Conference. Advance Edition Page 1306. 

Leave of Absence of Ordained Ministers. 
Amend 11448.1: 

. . . This relationship may be initiated by the 
minister or the Cabinet, with or without the consent of 
the clergy member. . . . 

... upon the board's recommendation. The poraon in 
question has the right to a hearing before the bishop. 
Cabinet, and executive committee of the Board of 
Ordained Ministry prior to the granting of a leave of 
absence wthout the minister's consent. Between 
sessions.... 

... upon the written request of the clergy member or 
the Cabinet with o r wthout the consent of the clergy 
members. . . 



Petition Nurrben LC-12322-0269-D; Thomas H. Griffith, California-Pacific 
Conference. Advance Edition Page 1 272. 

The Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations. 

Amend 1269.2 

"There shall be a Committee on Pastor-Parish 
Relations (Staff-Parish Relations)? of not fewer than five 
nor more than nine lay persons representative of the 
total charge. In general, this committee shall have not 
fewer than five nor more than nine members. However, 
in situations where the missional needs of a particular 
Charge warrant a larger Committee, the District 
Superintendent or Designated Elder presiding may 
approve a larger membership on the Committee upon a 
two-thirds vote of the Charge Conference. One of the 
five to nine persons members may be a senior high 4 

youth. In addition to the five to nine persons a lay 
member of the Aimual Conference. . . . 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



129 



Correction In Petition Numbers 



Daily Christian Advocate 

(1) Page 209; Paragraph 614; Petition Number 
CO- 10812-614- D;GCFA,GCOM Delete "GCOM" . 
New Petition Number is CO-12447-614-D: GCFA. 

Petition Number CO-10812-614-D; GCOM. (Left 
Column, 7 lines from bottom) Subject: "The 
Membership of Jurisdictional Conferences." Correct as 
shown. 

(2) Page 910; Paragraph 514 (second column) 
Petition Number MN-10643-514-D; "GCCU: Specific 
Responsibilities of Bishops." Keep as is. Remove 
GCCU, and add Council of Bishops. 

Petition Number MN-10643-514-D; GCCU, Council 
of Bishops; Specific Responsibilities of Bishops. 
(Second Column 1/3 of the way down) Correct Petition 
Number should be: MN- 12448- 514-D; GCCU. 
Remove Council of Bishops. 

(3) Page 913; Paragraph 733; Petition Number 
MN-10171-733-D;GBOD,EPA,MNN: "Lay Observers 
of Conference Board of Ordained Ministries." Keep as 
is. 

Petition Number MN-10171-733-D; GBOD "Lay 
Observers of Conference Board of Ordained 
Ministries" (second column, 15 lines from bottom). 
Correct Petition Number: MN- 12449-733-D; GBOD. 

(4) Page 1112; Paragraph 748; Petition Number 
DI-1225-0748-D; National Association of Annual 
Conference Lay Leaders, Springfield,NE 
"Coordinating Committee on Lay Work." Correct 
Petition Number is: DI-12025-0748-D. 

(5) Page 1147; Paragraph 718; Petition Number 
FA-11367-0718-D; Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR. Keep as 
is. 

(Right Colunrn, 4 lines down) Petition Number 
FA-11367- 0718-D; Jim Beal, Little Rock, AR: "Plan 
and Method of Clergy Support." Correct Petition 
Number should be: FA-12450-0718-D. 

(6) Page 1155; Paragraph 912; Petition Number 
FA-111074- 0912-D; Administrative Board, Mount Oak 
UMC, Mitchellville, MD. Correct Petition Number is: 
FA-11074-0912-D. 

(7) Page 1272; Paragraph 2518; Petition Number 
LC-2518-D. Correct Petition Number is: 
LC-11301-2518-D. Delete title: "Fair Share of Property 
in a Realignment Charge." Add title: "Authority of the 
Board of Church Location." 

(8) Page 1274; Paragraph 2540; Petition Number 
LC-11882-2540-D; Ministry Development Committee, 
Fayetteville, NC (left column, line 24). Delete this 



petition, through line 28. Petition Number 
LC-11882-2540-D, starting on line 29 remains as is. 

(9) Page 1293; Paragraph 424; Petition Number 
MN-SIXPT = Petition Number MN-10163-0424-D 
"Question for the Order of Elder." Remove the words: 
"Petition Number MN-SIXPT = ". 

(10) Page 1083; Paragraph 12; Petition Number 
CO-12084-0012-C; 63 Members of GBGM, Women's 
Division and St. Paul, St. Andrew, New York, NY; 
"General Conference Membership." Correct Petition 
Number is CO-12083-0012-C. 




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130 



May 7, 1992 



Changes in Standing Legislative Committees 



Church and Society 

Remove: Braimon, WiUiam C. ("North Alabama) 

Add: Bahule, Andre N. (Mozambique) 
Um, Mary (The Korean Methodist Church) 
York, Billy L. (Xorth Alabama.) 

Conferences 

Remove: Bahule, Andre N. (Mozambique) 
Hearin, Gerry M. Jr. (North Alabama) 

Add: Brannon, William C. (North Alabama) 

Discipleship 

Remove: Bozard, James D. (Florida) 
Add: Hamilton, Tom W. (Florida) 
Financial Administration 

Remove: Berry. Beverley C. <FIorida) 

GeneraiyJudicial Administration 

Add: Hearin, Gerry M. Jr. (North Alabama) 

Global Ministries 

Add: Christian, Vidya G. (Methodist Church in 

India) 
Seng, Soon Jin (Methodist Church in Malaj-sia) 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

Remove: York, Billy L. (North Alabama) 

Local Church 

Add: Rodriguez, (iene (Florida) 

Additions and Changes to Listing of 
Voting and Reserve Delegates 

Florida: 

Remove: Berr>-, Beverley C. (resigned) 

Add to end of reserve list: Sweatt, Helen B., retired, 
3750 29th Ave. S., St. Petersburg, PL 33711 

Remove: Bozard, James D. (deceased) 

Add to end of reserve list: Stiles, Jennifer R., 

student. Route 6, Box 467M, Tallahassee, FL 32304 

South Dakota: 

Remove: Ward, Richard A. (resigned) 



Add to end of reserve list: Berkenpas, Darlis A., pastor, 
2708 S. 9th Ave., Sioux FaUs, SD 57105 

Sweden: 

Remove: Eliasson, Ann-Marie 

Add to end of reserve Ust: Jonsson, Christer 

Changes in Standing Administrative 
Committees 

Committee on Reference 

Add: L. Ray Branton (Louisiana) 



Nominations to the 

Interjurisdictional Committee on 

Episcopacy 

Western Jurisdiction 

Oregon-Idaho 

Remove: Carol L. Colley 

Add: Marilyn J. Outslay 

Changes in Commission Central 
Conference Affairs 

Add: Kjemald, Margareta 
Remove: Eliasson, Ann-Marie 

Non-Voting Delegates from 

Affiliated Autonomous Methodist 

and United Churches 

The Methodist Church of Hong Kong (2) 

Man, Kwok-uai i ), Hong Kong Circuit superintendent, 
IfF, Yen Mem Building, 98-108 Jafie Road, Wan Chai, 
Hong Kong 

Lin, David Huo-fu ISO ( ), immediate past vice-presi- 
dent, 1/F, Yen Mem Building, 98-108 Jaffe Road, Wan 
Chai, Hong Kong 



EvangeUcal Methodist Church of Costa 
Rica<2) 

Section B, Row 22, Seats 6-7 
Palomo, Fernando ( ), 
Herrera. Carlos ( ), 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



131 



Legislative Committee Reports 



I 



Church and Society 

Six sub-committees were organized to act upon peti- 
tions addressing the following subjects: 

1) gambling, human rights (e.g., children, persons 
with handicapping conditions, etc.), drug and alcohol 
concerns, community issues, criminal justice, discipli- 
nary paragraphs on Church and Society structure. 
Chair: Patricia Deal, North Texas. 

2) world issues (nuclear arms, eco-justice). Chair: 
FVank Gaylord, Wisconsin. 

3) Social Principles paragraphs on political and 
world communities and "Our Social Creed," gun con- 
trol, homelessness, etc. Chair: Beth Capen, New York. 

4) medical, genetics, and health-care issues. Chair: 
Bernice Johnson, North Carolina. 

5) abortion. Chair: Phillip Lawson, California/Ne- 
vada. 

6) pornography, environment (national), investment 
policies, new disciplinary paragraph related to AIDS. 
Chair: Susan Sherbrooke, Pacific Northwest. 

— Suzanne Calvin, Lee Ranch (May 6, 4:00) 

Conferences 

The committee divided into 3 sub-committees deal- 
ing with petitions fi-om: 

1) annual and district conferences. Chair: Jean Dow- 
ell, Minnesota. 

2) jurisdictional conferences. Chair: Robert T. Casey, 
South Georgia. 

3) General Conference petitions and constitutional 
matters. Chair: Margaret A. Paige, Detroit. 

— Dan Ganger, Jane Dennis, (May 6, 3:20) 

Discipleship 

The committee heard presentations from two repre- 
sentatives of the Oklahoma Indian Missionary Confer- 
ence and one representative of the Native American 
International Caucus. The three expressed concerns 
about the "Native American Service of Thanksgiving," 
and asked that it not be include in the Book of Worship. 
Reasons cited: offensive to several tribes that observe 
the "Ceremony of the Green Com," upon which the 
thanksgiving service is based. 

The committee divided into two groups to consider 
the proposed Book of Worship 

—Bettie Story, Garlinda Burton (May 6, 5:30) 

Faith and Mission 

The committee agreed to take up in full committee 
both the report of the Committee to Study Homosexual- 
ity, related petitions, the Baptism study ("By Water 



and the Sprit"), and related petitions. Eight members of 
the study committee presented an overview of its re- 
port. No action was taken on the report or petitions. 

—Lynn DeMichele, Ann Whiting (May 6, 4:45) 

Financial Administration 

The committee agreed to divide into 5 sub-commit- 
tees: 

1) (jcneral Board of Publication, and the Task Force 
on Relocation of the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries; 

2) budget; 

3) General Board of Pensions (other than health 
care); 

4) health insurance; 

5) general finance, administration, and miscellane- 
ous. 

—Jean Coffey Lylea, Willie Teague (May 6, 3:30) 

General and Judicial Administration 

The committee divided into 4 sub-committees: 

1) church programs; 

2) structure; 

3) other (Jeneral Council on Ministries concerns; 

4) Chapter 8 (of the Discipline. 

—Ralph E. Baker, Linda Green (May 6, 3:30) 

Global Ministries 

The committee heard presentations on the National 
Plan for Hispanic Ministries by Bishop Elias Galvan 
and on the Native American Comprehensive Plan by 
Cynthia Kent, GBGM staff person. 

It divided into 4 sub-committees: 

1) small membership churches/rural concerns. Chair: 
Knih Khin Jensen, Minnesota. 

2) Native American concerns. Chair: Susan Hass- 
inger, Eastern Pennsylvania. 

3) Hispanic concerns. Chair: Arturo M. Femandex, 
California-Nevada. 

4) general and conference level Global Ministries 
concerns. Chair: Frank Dorsey, Kansas East. 

—Betty Thompson (May 6, 3:30) 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

The following 4 sub-committees were formed: 

1) chaplains and related ministries. Chair: Tom L. 
Christian, North Texas. 

2) annual conferences Boards of Higher Education 
and Campus Ministries. Chair: Samuel Montgomery, 
Texas. 



132 



May 7, 1992 



3) University Senate. Chair: Paul C. Bailey, Vir- 
ginia. 

4) Division of Higher Education and Theological 
Schools. Chair: Phylemon D. Titus, Detroit. 

— Alvin J. Horton, Karen Tiainger (May 6, 5:00) 

Independent Commissions 

The committee spent its first 30 minutes in dialogue 
and reflection on the presentation on the Simi Valley 
verdict heard in the morning plenary. 

Five sub-committees were formed: 

DCOSROW; 

2) Religion and Race; 

3) Archives and History; 

4) Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns; 

5) other matters. 

—Kristin K Knudson (May 6, 5:00) 

Local Church 

Four sub-committees were formed: 

1) Paragraphs 102-106, 107-113, 201-207, 208-243. 
Chair: Shirley Parrish. 

2) Paragraphs 244-256. Chair: Sandra Hoke. 

3) Paragraphs 257-271. Chair: Bob Pierson. 

4) Paragraphs 2524-2552 and resolutions. Chair: Lu- 
ther Henry. 

—Kathy Kruger Noble, Rayford Woodrick (May 6, 3:40) 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

The committee accepted the recommendations of its 
executive committee to deal, as a full body, with the re- 
port of the Commission to Study the Ministry as its first 
item. It also voted to divide the body into 4 sub-commit- 
tees, chairs to be chosen later in the day. Membership of 
each sub-committee is to be decided May 7. 

—Nancye WUlis, Judy Smith (May 6, 3:45) 

Central Conferences 

The committee met on Monday, May 4, and con- 
cluded its business by adjournment at 5:30. It concurred 
with the petition that would permit the Council of Bish- 
ops to assign one of its members to another episcopal 
area to exercise the fiinctions of the episcopacy upon the 
request of the resident bishop . 

The committee approved the following matters re- 
ferred to it by the Council of Bishops: 

* that the South Afiican Central Conference be in- 
cluded in the Central Conference of The United Method- 
ist Church; 

* that the number of bishops in the Northern Europe 
Central Conference be increased fi-om one to two in or- 



der to provide episcopal supervision over the mission to 
the Commonwealth of Independent States; 

* that the nimiber of bishops in the West Afi-ica Central 
Conference be increased fi-om two to three in Nigeria; 

* that North Shaba be included in the Zaire Central 
Conference. 

In other action the committee voted to affirm the 
General Board of Global Ministries as well as the Afi-i- 
can Growth Initiative. 

—Billie R. Dalton 



Albany Area Urges 
Fasting for Funds 



All General Conference delegates are challenged by 
the Albany Area (Troy and Wyoming Conferences) not 
only to join in today's (May 7) fast but to contribute to a 
goal of more than $50,000 to help feed hungry people of 
the world. 

The Rev. James M. Perry, director of the Troy Con- 
ference Council on Ministries, said that fasting dele- 
gates are urged to contribute an amount equivalent to 
or more than their $62 daily expense allowance. Re- 
ceipts will be divided evenly between the Louisville food 
bank and the United Methodist Committee on Relief 
(UMCOR) Advance Special for "U.S. Civil Disturbance 
in Los Angeles" (Code No. 901735-2). 

Persons who, due to medical reasons, cannot fast are 
urged to join in prayer and financial support. Perry 
noted. 

Each delegation chairperson wiU receive today a col- 
lection envelope and a special supply of stickers reading, 
'Tm Fasting with the Albany Area," Perry explained. 
Donations will be collected through tomorrow evening. 
May 8. Sealed envelopes containing donations can be re- 
tiirned to the "Challenge" director by conference pages. 
Checks should be made out to the "Albany Area Chal- 
lenge." 

"All donations will be deposited in a local bank," 
Perry said, "and the total will be announced and dis- 
bursed before the end of General Conference." 

The fast-and-fund idea was originated by Rev. Wil- 
liam J. Barney and Dorothy M. Earl, chairpersons of the 
Troy and Wyoming delegations respectively. In its origi- 
nal form it was adopted at a late March meeting. The ef- 
fort received extra emphasis yesterday with conference 
approval of a motion calling for fasting and a service of 
reconciliation focused on the civil disturbance in Los 
Angeles. 



— Tom Potter 



Daily Edition VoL 4 Na 3 



133 



Proceedings of the 1992 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



Committee On Journal Report 

The Committee on Journal hereby certifles as accurate, with the foUowing 
corrections, the proceedings as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate for 
Tuesday, May 6, 1992. 

Daily Edition, p. 86, coL 2, Global Ministries Officers-Substitute *Raul 
Alegria" for "Paul Al^ria'. 

Daily Edition, p. 99, coL 1, par. 1-Paragraph 1 should be attributed to 
CAROLYN MARSHALL. 

Daily Edition, p. 99, coL 3, par. 2-Substitute not* for "law". 

Daily Edition, p. 101, coL 2, first two f\ill pars, should be attributed to 
CHARLES E. LUTRICK 

Daily Edition, p. 101, coL 2, third full par. should be attributed to BISHOP 
de CARVALHO. Add in parentheses at end of par. "(Approved by hand vote)" 

Daily Edition, p. 104, col. 3, par. 7-Substitute "on ordained" for "unordained". 

Daily Edition, p. 105, coL 1, par. 4-Substitute "CAROLYN MARSHALL" for 
"UNIDENTIFIED PERSON". Substitute "Brawn" for "Broad". 

Daily EdiHon, p. 105, col. 2, par. 2-Sub8titute "BISHOP TALBERT" for 
"UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER." 

Daily Edition, p. 105, coL 3, par. 2-Substitute "after" for " act oV. 

Daily Edition, p. 106, coL 2. par. 2-Sub8titute "OMBAKU LOMOTO (Central 
Zaire)" for "UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER" 

Daily Edition, p. 106, col. 2, par. 5-Delete "unintelligible". Substitute "I am 
going to translate" for "but don't wait". 

Daily Edition, p. 106, coL 2, last full par. should read, "The intent of our 
motion is that the remainder of the plenaiy tomorrow will be for this issue" 

Daily Edition, p. 107, coL 1, par. 3-Substitute "blocks" for "walks". 

Daily Edition, p. 107, col. 2, par. 4-In8ert following "is this rightr the 
sentence in parentheses "(Norris responded, "yes.")" Insert following "an- 
nouncements for us tonight?" the sentence in parentheses "(Marshall 
responded, "no".)" 

Daily Edition, p. 107, coL 2~Insert following the last par. the following: 

(song) 

BISHOP SPAIN: Our closing prayer tonight will be given by Bishop Edward 
TuUis. 



(Prayer) 



H. Sharon Howell (chair) 
Section C, row 8 



Wednesday Morning 
May 6, 1992 

Bishop WiUiam B. Lewis, presiding 
(benediction and hymns) 

BISHOP WILLIAM B. LEWIS: Let's 
find our way back to our places and be in 
order. We are already five minutes behind. 
At this rate, we'll be a month. The order 
of the day is for us to hear the Laity Ad- 
dress. And if Ken Plummer will come, 
we're ready to begin that part of our busi- 
ness. They don't listen. May we have your 
attention, please? I mean, sit down! And 
then be quiet! Scouts' honor, or some- 
thing. Ken Plummer is the conference lay 
leader of the Central Pennsylvania An- 
nual (Conference. And he has the pleasure 
of introducing for us our Laity Address 
speaker. 

KEN PLUMMER (Central Pennsyl- 
vania): Bishop Lewis, fellow delegates. 
Over two years ago, the National Associa- 
tion of Annual (Conference Lay Leaders 
started the search process for the person 
to present the Laity Address to you this 
morning. The Laity Address would be a 
speech that best captured the spirit and 
visions of United Methodist laity. It was to 
highlight the ministiy of the laity in their 
communities and their congregations. 
The theme for the address was to be, 
"Ministiy of the Laity: Serving God in Our 
World, in Our Private Lives, and in Public 
Responsibilities-Connecting Faith and 
Action." The search was open to all 
laypersons throughout the world who 
were members of The United Methodist 
Church. The search process worked; 284 
persons, including several from Central 
conferences, submitted manuscripts to be 
screened and judged. Ten volunteer 
screeners from the five jurisdictions 
selected 46 manuscripts for fmal reading 
by all screeners. This second reading gave 
us four fmalists. These four persons, three 
women and one man, came to Nashville 
and presented their addresses to the con- 
ference lay leaders at their 1992 annual 
meeting. And three judges who were not 
lay leaders had to select the address that 
they felt best expressed the theme, "Min- 
istiy of the Laity: Serving God in our 



134 



May 6, 1992 



Private Lives and Public Responsibilities- 
Connecting Faith and Action." The per- 
son selected was Ruby Galloway Parish, a 
member of Boston Avenue United 
Methodist Church of Tulsa, OK-a church 
school teacher, an active church worker, 
homemaker, chaplain with the Tulsa 
Police Department. She was honored in 
1988 as a Tulsa Volunteer of the Year. It 
is with great pleasure and pride I present 
to you Ruby Galloway Parish. (Lay address 
found on page 116) 

Singing 

BISHOP WILLIAM B. LEWIS: Thank 
you. Ruby, and God bless you, speaking so 
well for all of us. We have a technical 
problem; I'd like your patience to quietly 
give us your attention for a few moments 
so that we can work it out. We have a 
number of people with us who are receiv- 
ing translation. They have a little box in 
addition to the little voting box that all of 
us have that their earphones plug into and 
we've had some new arrivals who need 
translation and we've run out of the 
receiver boxes; got plenty of headphones. 
And each receiver box has a plug-in recep- 
tical for two sets of headphones. So that 
each of you who are receiving translation 
that is sitting by someone else who is 
receiving translation, if you were willing 
and can do it, give us your receiver boxes 
back and plug both sets of headphones, 
yours and your neighbor's that sits next to 
you, into the same box. And that way, we 
can have a few more receivers, the little 
receiver boxes for the newcomers. Hold 
your hand up (if you understand what I've 
said) for me. If you are receiving transla- 
tion and there are two of you sitting side- 
by-side, you both can use the same 
receiver box. And let ua have the receiver 
box, and if you can do that and would raise 
your hand, one of the pages will come and 
pick up your receiver box and bring it 
down to the translators. We'd appreciate 
if you help us with that All right, our 
secretary Carolyn Marshall will present 
some nominees to us for the Inteijurisdic- 
tional Committee. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: The nomi- 
nees as they have been received from the 
various annual conferences are recorded 
in the Advance DCA, Volume 1, on pp. 76 
and 77. An addendum to that report is on 
p. 35 of the DCA under a dateline of May 
5, 1992. There is one change that still 
needs to be made which has been received; 
that is in the Western Jurisdiction— 



Or^on-Idaho Annual Conference. The 
name of Carol L. Colley is to be replaced 
with Mariljm J. Outsley. These are the 
nominations for the Inteijurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, you have 
these nominations before you there on 
p. 35. 1 recognize the man to my left and 
wUl you go to microphone 12, please? 

CHARLES YRIGOYEN (Eastern Penn- 
sylvania): On p. 76 under the Northeast- 
em Jurisdiction, Eastern Pennsylvania 
Conference, the name of Charles Yrigoyen 
should be replaced with the name of 
Claude A. Edmonds. 

BISHOP LEWIS: P. 76, are you in the 
Advance DCA now with that one? 

YRIGOYEN: Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, thank you 
for that correction. I recognize the, we will 
go to microphone 8, please? 

RAY OWEN (Oklahoma): We need to 
replace the name Tal Oden on p. 77, the 
Oklahoma Del^ation. Tal Olden should 
be replaced with Tom Junk. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right, that's p. 77, 
Tal Oden. 

OWEN: Tal Oden. 

BISHOP LEWIS: In the place of Tom . .. 

OWEN: No, Tom Junk should be the 
new name. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Tom Junk in place of 
Tal Oden. 

OWEN: Yes, thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you. I'm not 
really playing Ed McMahon to your 
Johnny Carson. We have a tape running 
and it can't read; and so on some of these 
numbers we need to see that they get into 
the tape and need a little time also for the 
translators to pick up some of those details 
about places. Are there any other correc- 
tions to these nominations? Are you ready 
to elect them? All who will do so, we got 
someone else Will you go microphone 13, 
please, in the center? 

BEVERLY ABBOTT: (Maine) on p. 76 
in the Advance DCA to the Northeastern 
Jurisdiction, the names under Maine 
should read James Lee McPhee as clergy 
and Richard Gross as the lay. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right. Do you aU 
have those? Will you go to microphone 14, 
please? That's it; you're headed for it. 

L. RAY BRANTON (Louisiana): My 
name has been lefl off the Committee on 
Reference. I am L. Ray Branton. 

BISHOP LEWIS: That's the Committee 
on Reference; it's on p. 35, isn't it? 

MARSHALL: May I speak to that? 



BISHOP LEWIS: Yes, thank you. All 
right, our secretaiy has a response to that ^ 

MARSHALL: Those committees are ap- ^ 
pointments by the Coimdl of Bishops. 
That name was inadvertently omitted 
when that listing was made The correc- 
tion has been turned in to the DCA and all 
of those lists of corrections in delegations 
were to have been in today's DCA. Some- 
thing happened and th^ are not there, so 
several of you are going to have similar 
questions as far as changes in your delega- 
tion, changes for legislative committees. 
And I simply say, we've again taken it in 
this morning. Hopefully, it will be in 
tomorrow's edition. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, will you go 
to microphone 4, please? 

PHILIP CONNOLLY (West Ohio): I 
believe ours got in after the deadline, and 
I'm sure that it'U be added in the correc- 
tions that the secretaiy just talked about 

MARSHALL: It is already in on p. 35. 

CONNOLLY: OK, thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, are we ready 
to elect? If so, vote now. All right, the 
count is 859 yes, 8 no, and 7 abstentions. 
I know you all can read, but remember the 
tape recorder can't Our next item of busi- 
ness is the election of John Street Church 
trustees. Are we ready for those? There 
was some question about whether we 
would be. 

MARSHALL: Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: We are. Good. 

MARSHALL: Whereas the deed of the 
John Street United Methodist Church of 
New York City calls for the election of that 
church's board of trustees by the General 
Conference; that plan was approved in the 
General Conference session of 1868. 
General Conferences since then through 
1988 have so elected these tnistees. Now I 
present to you the nominees as they come 
from the John Street United Methodist 
Church; trustees to serve for the period 
1992-96. The resident bishop of the New 
York Annual Conference, Wilma Roberts, 
James Cardwell, Warren L. Jervy, William 
C. Kirkwood, Raynor R. Rogers, Stephen 
Rose, William T. Staubach Jr. and Connie 
Takamine. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, is there any 
question about these nominations? Are 
you ready to elect them? If so, vote now. 
The count is 870 yes, 9 no and 18 absten- 
tions. Thank you. We are ready for con- 
sideration of the order of the day that was 
put into our agenda yesterday and if Wil- 
lard Stevens will come to the microphone, 
he will lead us off in that presentation 



Daily Edition VoL 4 Na 3 



1S5 



concerning the Simi Valley verdict He's 
coming. He's tiying to figure out how I 
knew his name was Willard instead of 
Buzz. 

WnXARD STEVENS (Desert South- 
west): Bishop Lewis and members of the 
General Ck>nference, I'm Buzz Stevens 
from the Desert Southwest Annual Con- 
ference, and James Lawson and Beverly 
Shamana will be leading us through this 
process, so I call on them at this point 

JAMES LAWSON (Califomia-Padfic): 
Bishop Lewis and sisters and brothers of 
the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church, first of all, let me give 
you an overview of what we hope to try to 
da And may I say to you that a variety of 
people have been working on these mat- 
ters since we've arrived at General Con- 
ference. From across our connection, 
many, many conversations, some of which 
went on imtil 2 o'clock this morning 
tiying to shape some of this, and then 
tiying to make contact rather in the hectic 
process of the General Conference with 
the variety of people who have had input 
and who want to have input But the over- 
view is this. I wiU make an introductoiy 
statement that tries to lift up some of the 
dimensions of what we're talking about. 
Then we have asked a group of witnesses 
to have a couple of moments with a litany 
of song and prayer in between. Then 
Beverly Shamana will lead us in a period 
of dialogue and an open-mike process, 
afler which then we have prepared five 
motions to present to you. And then final- 
ly, Bishop Leontine Kelly has been asked 
to give a concluding reflection and medita- 
tion and prayer. We will have six motions 
for your consideration this morning. 
Beverly Shamana will make one of these 
and then I wiU make, at the end, the other 
fiva We appreciate very much the fact that 
you have changed the agenda sufHciently 
to let the flash points across the United 
States speak to us. Let me say very briefly 
that in the city of Los Angeles, which is in 
a sense the center point of what happened, 
that it is an experience that the United 
States has never before faced. Nothing in 
the '608 can equal the impact or the width 
or the depth of what happened in Los 
Angeles. We're talking about over 4,000 
fires. How all of these occurred it may take 
weeks and months for us to really learn. 
Some of the early assessments of the 
media I suspect are absolutely wrong. 
Twenty-five hundred injuries, 50 deaths to 
date. According to my people in Los An- 
geles last night, 11,000 arrests. Most of 



them for the first time having any kind of 
encounter with the police. Now, of course, 
I've only mentioned in a sense those kinds 
of statistics. But, of course, those statistics 
do not begin to indicate the massive dis- 
location or the dissembling of life on the 
part of literally thousands of people 
Those statistics do not describe the fact 
that it was across the metropolitan area- 
Hollywood, Beverly Hills, south central 
Los Angeles, Crenshaw, West Adams area, 
Long Beach, 25 miles away at the Harbor, 
east Los Angeles, west Los Angeles, 
downtown. It doesn't indicate the extent 
to which we're not talking about a single 
community but a vast metropolitan area 
and according to many reports and many 
the people of my own congregation, there 
were White looters, there were Black 
looters, there were Hispanic; there were 
men, there were women, there were 
children. They cut across classes. The 
stories are still unraveling as to why they 
looted. There were two different groups. 
On the one side, those who were doing the 
firing of places. There's some indication 
that some of the fires took place because 
landlords decided this was a good time to 
get rid of their property and bow out. I 
don't know what evidence will document 
that, but that is widely said across Los 
Angeles. But there was a distinctive group, 
the fires and then the looters. To see, in 
fact, mothers going into drug stores that 
were burned and taking Pampers and 
when asked, "Why are you doing it?" "be- 
cause we need them, and tomorrow they 
will not be there anyway." The deaths 
were all races. There have been many 
lineups in the press of the names and who 
they are and what they were doing, where 
they were. Some have said, "Well they 
were in the wrong place at the wrong 
time." I insist that no human being is in 
the wrong place at the wrong time if 
they're alive. That's an excuse for a society 
that still is weaned on violence and hos- 
tility towards people and categorizing 
people in such a fashion that it writes 
them out of the human race rather than 
including them in. The fires, the deaths, 
affected all our communities. The fires 
were not just with the Korean-American 
merchants. They, coming into a new cul- 
ture, already suffer cultural shock. But, of 
course, the worst of the cultural shock is 
the pathology of American racism that 
they know nothing about from their own 
society. And so they're in pain. Korean 
businesses that were burned. But Black 
businesses also were burned, probably in 



larger numbers than Korean businesses. 
Many of our congregations are counseling 
with families whose businesses have 
burned. Many of our congregations- 
Black, Hispanic, Anglo. There was Jewish 
looting. There were Jewish youngsters ap- 
parently [unintelligible]. Now I would like 
to suggest to you that we have to look 
beyond the categories that the press uses. 
For the first instance, I'd like to propose 
to us that if we are paying attention to the 
territories where we operate, that is, to the 
places to which we have been assigned 
either as lay people or clergy, if we're 
pajdng attention to the places where we 
have been assigned, we will discover 
whether it's White, Black, blue, green, yel- 
low; rich, poor, middle-class, affluent, or 
impoverished or on the edge, that there is 
great pain that cuts across all of these 
categories in the United States today. The 
suicide rates eveiywhere indicated, the 
murder rates from the FBI indicated, go 
back and look at the 1991 murder rates 
from the FBI which I saw three weeks ago 
for the first time. In 1991, 23,000 murders: 
9,700 White men, 9,400 Black men; Asian, 
Hispimic to a lesser number. White men 
killing White men. Black men kiUing 
Black men. You cannot analyze that as 
being racist; you've got to analyze that as 
all kinds of people who have a sense of 
shame about who they are, a sense that 
their lives are not worth. Our American 
society is teaching millions of our people 
all across the categories that we like to use, 
that their life is worthless. 

[Unintelligible] Eighty-seven % of those 
verdicts, according to the FBI, were White 
on White, Black on Black, with the age 
group of 15-40 in the males being the 
group at risk. We'd like to say this is only 
a disease in the Black community. No, 
sisters and brothers, it's not, any more 
than divorce and family breakup is only a 
disease in the Black community. It's a 
disease in America, and we in the church 
need to begin to address that to the press, 
and to the President, to the politicians, to 
the multinational corporations, to oursel- 
ves. 

That's why the word of the 1960s was 
never heard. For Martin King posed the 
word welL He did not speak primarily in 
terms of segregation or integration. Mar- 
tin King said, as he called many of us into 
mission and ministry, "We are about the 
business of redeeming the soul of America. 
If you translate this from the Hebrew, we 
are about the business of redeeming the 
life of America." 



136 



May 6, 1992 



That's why historically, in the Black 
American Christian tradition, Exodus, the 
third chapter, has always been a primary 
source of our understanding of how God 
moves in the world. "I have seen the suf- 
fering of my people. I have seen the op- 
pression with which they are oppressed. 
And I have come down to rescue them and 
to lead them to a good land of milk and 
honey. So, you go, Moses, and tell 
Pharaoh." 

We like to say too often in the church, 
the world shapes the agendas of the 
church. Yes, because God sees the pain 
and misery in our world and addresses the 
church, and says, "Go, and do something 
about it You go. I'd come down to rescue. 
You go and do it" At the heart of the 
problem is what Toni Morrison calls the 
"pathology of raca" 

If indeed, the law of life, as Moses and 
Jesus insisted, is simple-"Thou shalt love 
the Lord your God with heart and mind 
and soul and strength, and your neighbor 
as yourself '-then when we, from the very 
beginning, committed the genocide of the 
Native Americans, established slavery, 
refused to allow the Ck>nstitution to in- 
clude women and aU who did not own a 
piece of land, we created the basis of two 
societies. We created the seed of destruc- 
tion in our own corporate life and charac- 
ter. And we of the church must hear the 
voice of God calling us to transform it. 

We are a violent society, which is 
another form of "thingification," and we 
suggest to you this morning that that 
violence permeates every community. 
Family abuse In fact, more American 
families experience a form of violence- 
rape, family abuse, wife beating, murder, 
assault, suidde, accidents-more 

American families experience a form of 
violence than experience anjrthing to do 
with drug addiction. Yet the drug addic- 
tion is the one being fought, while the 
violence in our hearts and in the land, the 
inner violence and the outer violence, are 
being ignored. 

But the spirit of the churches in Los 
Angeles is an Easter spirit, a Resurrection 
spirit Before, in fact, almost the first fire 
began, we had begun meeting to talk about 
what happens when the verdict comes 
down. And how do we mobilize the com- 
munity to do the right things, to not forget 
the issues that are significant? In the Los 
Angeles District of The United Methodist 
Church, our district superintendent 
Robert Smith immediately called a meet- 
ing of all the pastors. And last Sunday, all 



of our churches took offerings, and began 
to collect food and clothing. We began to 
establish saving stations in 2 districts, at 
least, perhaps 3 districts. I'm not sura We 
began to move on hunger, meeting the 
immediate emergency needs of people. 
We've established legal centers for coim- 
seling, counseling centers to help deal 
with the pain, and the hurt, and the 
brokenness. The food, medicine, 
transportation programs-wherever the 
needs are, we're trying to meet them al- 
ready because so many of our congrega- 
tions in the Los Angeles community are a 
people who are committed to the notion 
that the kingdom of God is at hand; the 
time is now. The kingdom of God is at 
hand. Repent and believe the gospeL 
Repent, fmd new directions for the life of 
the congregation, and the nation, and the 
earth, because we have been enabled and 
empowered by the one who revealed him- 
self fully, classically, powerfully in Jesus of 
Nazareth of the kingdom, and telling us, 
"Lo, I am with you, even to the end of the 
earth." 

The forces of the world have no ultimate 
weight. That the dangers we face even in 
what we see in this experience are dangers 
that are short-lived, because they repre- 
sent the principalities and powers. But the 
people of Crod dare to work in the midst of 
pain and sorrow for the purpose of letting 
life emerge out of death. Nonviolence out 
of violence A new dty out of an old dty. 
And a new himianity and a new people, 
who are graced by the love of God. 

WILLARD STEVENS (Desert South- 
west): 

STEVENS: Bishop, I share with the 
body a statement prepared by the Western 
Jurisdiction delegation, entitled "A Call to 
Repentance and Action." 

"The spirit of the Lord is upon us in this 
very moment, anointing us to bring good 
news to the oppressed, to bind up the 
brokenhearted, to prodaim liberty and 
release, to comfort those who mourn, to 
give a garland instead of ashes, to raise up 
the devastations of many generations, and 
to repair the ruined dties." 

Out of the rage and destruction we have 
seen from peoples of all colors in Los An- 
geles and other dties this past week, we, 
as people called United Methodist, believe 
that God's spirit is calling us to acknow- 
ledge and confess our failures, and to 
redaim our Wesleyan heritage. 

We stand in the tradition of John Wes- 
1^, who went into the places where people 
were hdpless, wounded, and dis- 



enfranchised, to live out and preach salva- 
tion and social holiness. The Book ofDis- 
dpline calls us to authentic Christian § 
response to the perils of the present age. 
A quote from the Discipline, "that the 
healing and redeeming work of God might 
be present in our words and deeds." 

Gathered here at the global United 
Methodist church, we can no longer ig- 
nore what Walter Bruegemaim has call 
the fabric of compromises and lies which 
shape our sodety. We have tried peace, 
peace where there is no peace. Our only 
way out is to acknowledge the deep pain, 
powerlessness and hopelessness which 
surpasses all lines of color and cultures- 
setting people against one another in fear 
along lines of dass. We must speak truth- 
fully of our pain, and only then are free to 
dream new dreams. We publidy confess 
that as United Methodists we have not 
done all that we might have done, all to 
confront and transform our own insen- 
tivity, that inertia towards racism. We 
have persistently ignored the signs and 
warnings of the violence of endemic 
radsm, dassism, and ii\justice. We have 
ignored our own spiritual emptiness and 
materialism. We have ignored our own 
Sodal Prindples, our theological task, and 
the gospel of Jesus Christ Oiu- confession 
must move us now to repentance and ac- 
tion. The church must act to devdop study 
and action programs that inform and edu- 
cate United Methodists about the un- 
finished business of creating a sodety as 
Martin Luther King Jr. described-where 
persons are judged on the content of their 
character rather than the color of their 
skin or their position in life. We call on 
this body to approach each issue on its 
agenda with what we have said is "our 
theological task for the disdpline to ex- 
press the heart cries of the downtrodden 
and the aroused indignation of the com- 
passionate." We ask the church to explore 
and devdop working rdationships with 
the community's social and political 
leaders to address issues of employment 
and economic need. We urge the U.S. 
Department of Justice to move with all 
immediacy, to investigate dvil rights 
violations in Los Angeles and other dties. 
As United Methodists, we must recognize 
that there will be no peace without justice 
and that justice must be lived out in every 
life, every home, and every institution of 
our sodety. In this crisis moment, we seek 4 
conversion as change of heart, a renewed 
vision and commitment to God's new 
heaven and new earth. "For justice shall 



Daily Edition VoL 4 Na S 



137 



roll down like mighty watersi and 
A righteousness like an ever lasting stream." 
^ BERNARD KEELS (Baltimore): The 
events of Los Angeles have hit me in a 
particular way as it relates to the issues of 
media in this country. I have been a 
television reporter and talk-show radio 
host and had been appalled at what the 
public turns on and listens to, and accepts 
as the gospel. The first rule that I dis- 
covered in media va that news is nothing 
more and nothing less than what the 
reporter says it is. The second truth I 
learned was in Baltimore, MD, when I 
wanted to do a story about an enterprising 
young Afro- American young man who had 
developed an escort service for senior 
citizens in the high-rise building. The 
news director told me that was not 
newsworthy. I said, "Explain to me what 
is news worthy?" He said that if a young 
man helped an old lady across the street it 
would not be newsworthy. If that same 
yoimg man, while helping the woman 
across the street, assaulted her, then that 
would be news. A sad statement on what 
the fifth estate is aU about Moreover, as I 
look around the rainbow of this room, I'm 
incredibly impressed, what our God has 
endowed in our hearts. The hues of our 
skin, the texture of our hair, the thickness 
of our lips, the accents that we have. We 
must look very carefuUy to know that 
most of us today, probably only know 
about our neighbor only what we've seen 
and heard and read. It was in 1968 that the 
Kemer Commission wrote its veiy famous 
remarks, and it said as I quote, "If White 
Americans allow what they see on 
television, read in the newspapers, or hear 
on radio, to condition the understanding 
and expectations of Black Americans, they 
will neither understand nor accept their 
brothers and sisters." I believe one can 
translate the same phrase today to talk 
about the Korean community. What do we 
really know about the Korean com- 
munity? What do we really know about the 
Native American community? Our only 
images of the Native American com- 
munity are in the cowboy and Indian 
serials. There was always a massacre when 
the Indians won. There was alwajrs a vic- 
tory when the cowboys won. It is very, very 
important that racism and sexism and 
stereotyping in our language and media be 
A avoided at all cost. It is amazing that 
'. people in the North who hear a southern 
accent think that every White person with 
a southern accent is a member of the Klan. 
For their feeling is pervasive in a northern 



part of this country, who say that It is 
amazing when you hear someone from an 
international community speak with an 
accent The media would have you believe 
that they are not as intellectually gifled as 
others. The fact of the matter is that they 
are twice as giiled, for they can think and 
speak in two languages. It is interesting- 
the image and role of women we see on 
media. You can see a man grow old and 
graceful behind an anchor desk. But you 
can't name one female anchor over the age 
of 40 or 45. We need to become vigilant in 
our efforts to understand what the media 
does, what it causes us to do. The in- 
dusiveness behind the cameras is another 
issue that hurts me so much. We need to 
know that Black and White and red and 
brown all should work to report and tell 
the stories of this great nation. One of the 
tragedies about Los Angeles was the 
steady diet of hate being filled without 
even knowing we were receiving it. A 
primary example would be those horrible, 
horrible pictures of men and women being 
dragged out of their vehicles and beat 
upon by angry mobs. Two things struck 
me as a journalist about that One, we did 
not see anybody rescuing. We know that 
there were a lot of people who risked their 
lives to rescue-to the extent you only see 
the perpetrator; you begin to subliminaUy 
think that everybody that hue is of the 
same mind-set But the second condition 
of that camera work that was more devas- 
tating—and a lot of us never realize it— 
whenever you see someone burning or 
someone being beat or hit in the head with 
a fire extinguisher and your soul gets 
chilled down to the bone, you must ask 
yourself one quick central question. 
Where is the man or the woman who was 
pointing the camera in filming that event? 
How could they allow that to happen and 
only say, "Oh, what a shame, what a 
shame," and not put the camera down and 
help and go and rescue? 

We have some diflicult days ahead Days 
when we need to go back to the gospel of 
reconciliation, the gospel of transforma- 
tion, and ask ourselves a central question. 
If God intented for the rainbow to have 
many colors, why is it in the most powerful 
tool we have as a human family, we have 
a curious absence of ethnics and women in 
critical decision-making capacities? It is 
very, veiy sad to be able to tell one's story 
to the tongue and accent of your own 
experiences. I came from an all-ethnic 
denomination to become a United Metho- 
dist, and one of the reasons I did so was 



because I had a dream as a little boy. In 
Birmingham, AL, I realized something 
was vastly wrong with drinking water out 
of a different water fountain. I realized 
something was vastly wrong with always 
understanding that somehow my coarse 
hair and my thick lips were not an object 
of beauty. I was so happy when I made a 
trip to Africa and found out that indeed a 
gap in my teeth is considered a sex symbol 
In the media, the station offered me free 
orthodontal care if I would get my gap in 
my teeth fixed, a powerful statement 
Look at the imidimensional charac- 
teristics of those who are in the media. 
They look alike and sound alike. Those 
who are living below the Mason-Dixon 
line, why is it that your local anchorperson 
does not have an accent germaine to that 
particular geographical area? This must be 
carefully looked at VISN and UMCom 
and other great tools of the church must 
challenge America to see not through an 
eye dimly, but to see when we will be seen 
face to face— not to know in part, but to 
know fully, even as we are known. So J 
leave you this morning and ask you again 
that as you turn on the television thb 
night, don't worry about what you see and 
what you hear. Realize that every station 
and every market is accoimtable to some- 
one. There needs to be active monitoring 
on the part of local United Methodist 
Women and local United Methodist Men's 
groups. The Women's Division is to be 
applauded for having the study group 
some years ago on racism and stereotyp- 
ing in language and media. It is a powerful 
dimension. It is a powerful dimension as 
we stand and because I've seen men this 
week and women this week who are Asian 
and that first moment is tense because we 
both are thinking, "You are the bad guy 
and You are the bad guy. You are not the 
bad guy; you are not the bad woman." It is 
this uncontrollable, powerful thing that 
we call "all the news that's fit to print" 
that needs to be changed in the twinkling 
of an eye I go now and I thank you for this 
time, and God be with you. God help The 
United Methodist Church. 

BRANDON CHO (California-Pacific): 
Bishop, my fellow United Methodists, I'm 
Brandon Cho, pastor of North Long Beach 
United Methodist Church, near by the 
City of Angels. Before I begin my sharing, 
I'd like to invite all the Asian-Americans 
that are sitting in this place to stand from 
your seats. Thank you. I'd like to read for 
us from 1 Corinthians 12:26, in which the 
apostle Paul, using a metaphor of a human 



138 



May 6, 1992 



body, speaks of the unity and account- 
ability of the body of Christ. "If one mem- 
ber suffers, all suffer together with it. If 
one member is honored, all rejoice 
together with it." My dear brothers and 
sisters in Christ, we are the body of our 
Lord. One of the marks of the body of 
Christ is God's mandate and our ability to 
bear each other's burden. And this morn- 
ing, I come to you with a veiy heavy bur- 
den in my soul. I share it with you as your 
Asian-American brother and particularly 
as your Korean-American brother. Last 
week, we witnessed probably the worst 
kind of urban violence in the histoiy of our 
nation. My fellow Korean-Americans suf- 
fered greatly as a consequence of it. 
Hundreds of their shops and businesses 
have been looted, destroyed, and burned 
down, leaving behind only the traces of 
ashes. The smoldering shells of their 
shops and businesses shocked them 
literally with the reality that their 
American dream for the land of oppor- 
tunity fiUed with milk and honey has been 
shattered. It took them many, many years 
of hard work- without a vacation, without 
a weekend break-to establish their life in 
this newfound homeland, only to be 
destroyed within minutes by fire and 
violent hands. Many who had gone 
through this terrible ordeal said, in one 
voice, that the City of Angels has turned 
into a battleground, a war zona And to my 
fellow Korean-Americans, it was another 
Korean War, and they have to tremble 
once again with fear between life and 
death. It was, in a literal sense of the word, 
a hell. Lamenting what has transpired 
after the verdict, Rodney King said, 
"Those police officers beat me, and now 
Los Angeles is beating me again." AU of 
my fellow Korean-American victims of 
this violence feel that they, too, were 
beaten and violated mercilessly. No one, 
no ethnic group, no race, should go 
through this terrible hell anymore. 
Enough is enough. Rodney King's shaky 
voice still lingers on in my ears, in my 
heart, when he raised this very simple, 
down-to-earth question: "Can we get 
along? Can we get along?" I invite you, my 
brothers and sisters in Christ, to identify 
with my fellow Korean-Americans' hurt 
and brokenness today. We want to be 
wounded healers. Join us, therefore, in 
transforming this violent nation of ours, 
which we love, into a nation of peace, 
reconciliation, harmony, a mutual hope 
for all peoples, regardless of their back- 
grounds and ethnicity and stations of life. 



After all, the love of Christ bears all 
things, believes all things, hopes all 
things, and endures all things. Just a few 
days ago, more than 30,000 Korean- 
Americans marched on the streets of Los 
Angeles, calling in one accord for peace, 
peace, peace. The image of this little child 
also marching on this will help us. This 
little boy was holding his grandma's hand 
with his right hand, and with his left hand 
he held with his little hand a sign that said, 
in English, "Peace," while his grandma 
was shouting in Korean, "Pyong-ha! 
Pyong-haJ Pyong-ha!" Let this be the song 
of our faith today. 

BEVERLY J. SHAMANA (California- 
Pacific): As you remain seated, shall we 
now sing verse 2 of #428? And you might 
have figured out now that it would probab- 
ly be wise just to keep that page marked 
for a little while longer. 

(hymn) 

MARVIN B. ABRAMS (California- 
Pacific): Good morning, friends. My name 
is Marv Abrams. I'm pastor of a Native 
American United Methodist church in 
southern California. I'm also Seneca. 
Many people would say, with a name like 
that, he should be a rabbL But again, it was 
the government that insisted at one point 
in our histoty that we all have last names, 
and some of them they couldn't spell, and 
some of them they couldn't pronoimca I 
would like to ask that ... I know there are 
many Native Americans in our . . . this 
census of 1990 there was an increase of 
39% in terms of Native Americans within 
the United States. In another section in 
the census it says that there are at least 6. 7 
million Native Americans, persons rather, 
who say they have as a ptirent one who is 
a Native Americfin. I would like to ask 
those who have Native American heritage 
to stand. Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: This is . . . Marvin and 
I have an understanding about this, but it 
goes back a ways. 

ABRAMS: A long ways. Right. Last 
night I heard with some deep emotion a 
bishop sharing in one paragraph saying, 
"Let us use the occasion of the 500th an- 
niversary of European expansion into the 
Americas for confession and reparation 
for the brutal exploitation and genocide of 
indigenous peoples." May this anniver- 
sary be a time of, as he said, "new begin- 
nings." Indigenous people in many lands 
need our support, as he said, in the strug- 
gle for justice. So often in the ... in all the 



reports in Los Angeles, there was no men- 
tion of Native Americans. And let, yet, let ^ 
me tell you a story of one, one woman 
whose plant was closed, who was riding a 
bus to work and didn't hear about that, 
and who was stranded on the other side of 
Los Angeles, the western side of Los An- 
geles. She lives in downtown Los Angeles, 
and she called our home. She's one of our 
members. She asked if someone would be 
able to go and get her, and my daughter 
and her boyfriend, they offered to go and 
get her. They came back from that ex- 
perience, from taking her home, and my 
daughter said, "Dad," she says, "you can 
see it on television, but," she says, "you 
don't know what it's like until you've been 
there." You don't know what it's like until 
you've been where we are. When we have 
people. Native American people, who are 
a problem to somebody-we've always 
been a problem to somebody-and have 
tried to deal with that problem in so many 
different ways. As Carol was saying, over 
half of the Indians today live in m^or 
metropolitan areas. There was a policy in 
the '50s and '60s to tiy to get Native 
Americans off reservations and into "the 
mainstream." We would say that today. 
We in the church are asking you to stand 
beside us. We have young people in one of 
our ministries in downtown Los Angeles. 
We took him home and I said, "Where do 
you live?" and he says, "Well, near Elysian 
Park." 

We got to the area and said, "Where is 
it? He said, "that second bush over thera" 
And that's where many of our people lived. 
We imderstand what economic ii^justice is 
about. We do not have businesses that will 
bum. But we have cardboard boxes that 
were burned. We are asking that you stand 
beside us as we address these economic 
problems of iryustice. We are asking that 
you stand beside us as we try to correct 
some of the false history that you find 
today, the stereofypes of romanticizing 
that we see on television and in the 
movies. When you ask young people, little 
ones, you ask them, what does an Indian 
look like? They say, "Well, he has feathers 
growing out of his head." Now you know 
that is not true. That is not the Indian of 
today. The Indian of today is living in 
economic poverty and on reservations 
across our country. The Indians of today 
are dealing with the stereotypes that hap- A 
pened. The Indian of today is trying to ^ 
raise up the issue of sovereignty, of na- 
tions within this nation. And people don't 
hear. And people don't listen. And people 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



139 



don't understand. We're asking that you 
^ stand beside us as we deal with that. 
" Within this General Conference there are 
a number of different petitions that are 
coming to us that deal with a comprehen- 
sive plan for Native Americans, and ena- 
bling the church to look at the total Native 
American population and address some of 
these issues that we are facing, not only in 
the urban centers where we have over half 
of the Indians, but on the reservations and 
rural areas where the same economic 
problems exist, where the same injustices 
exist. We are asking that you stand beside 
us as we deal with all that Today, yester- 
day rather, we asked that there be service 
of reconciliation and healing. We came to 
the church before the General Ckinference 
and we sat in recognition of the 500th 
anniversary of this "discoveiy" of 
; America. That there be a service of recon- 
ciliation, that the church repent, and that 
the church look at itself and review the 
history and deal with that. We said that we 
would like to have a service of reconcilia- 
tion and healing. And the church said no, 
until yesterday. We ask that you stand 
beside us. We need you, who are our rela- 
tives. We are all related. Among the Iro- 
quois, I am a Seneca and the Senecas are 
one of the Iroquois Confederacy. Among 
the Iroquois as they came together, there 
was a man who was called the Gunwada. 
He came and said, you Indian folks can 
work together. He bought 5 tribes 
together. And as a symbol of their willing- 
ness to work together, they buried their 
weapons at the base of a pine tree. For us, 
that is a great tree of peace. The roots of 
that tree, as seen by our people, are not 
just for Senecas or Iroquois people, but 
there for all people. We are all related. And 
that we ask that you stand beside us as we 
work together within the church. Thank 
you. 

(recess) 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you, Rosa. Let 
us tdl be seated and be in order. And we're 
ready for our next speaker. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: Bishop 
Lewis and sisters and brothers of this 
great conference. 
BISHOP LEWIS: Will you give your at- 
^ tention, please? 

P ARTURO FERNANDEZ (Califomia- 
f Nevada) : Just a couple of days before com- 
ing to Louisville those of us in Fresno, 
CA-I am Arturo Fernandez, serving a 
Methodist church in the inner dty of Fres- 



no, CA. A few days before we came, we 
were all, as the rest of the country and 
many parts of the world, shocked by the 
events in Los Angeles, and those of us who 
work with the poor in Fresno have been 
meeting and trying to avoid any problems 
that might occur in our conununities 
there. And it was during this time that a 
group of youth went and looted some of 
the stores and in the process came across 
a man who was sitting in his pickup truck, 
an Hispanic by the name of Rodriguez, 
who was there to sell his medicinal herbs 
to those who were celebrating El Cinco de 
Mayo, and sitting in his truck, he was shot 
and killed by this group without any 
reason whatsoever. We entered into that 
grief with that family, with the pain that 
was felt, not just in that family but 
throughout the Hispanic and a lot of the 
White community. I came with some of 
that grief, wondering how things are going 
with that family. And I also came to Louis- 
ville with the thoughts that were ex- 
pressed to me by my daughter Maria, who 
is ISyears old. As we discussed the terrible 
things that had happened in L.A. and were 
still happening, she looked at me, and she 
said, "Daddy, how can I now have con- 
fidence and trust In our judicial process?" 
That was a very difficult question for me. 
I didn't want to just answer right away 
because I know what her background is 
and I admire her in the first place for being 
able to raise that kind of question. I am 
concerned for the kind of answers that we 
are going to give to our children across the 
land. And what answers we are going to 
give as a church across the land, to those 
that ciy out for justice. As we watched on 
TV the violence and then with hope that 
our President would bring a good word 
and address the roots of our problems, we 
Hispanics were shocked to hear him give 
us his best word, apparently, which was to 
promise us that he was sending the INS to 
L.A. to apparently take care of the prob- 
lem, to weed out from among us those, 
perhaps, who are the cause of the problem. 
We are indeed confused in this country. 
We are indeed confused when we think 
that that kind of solution that resorts 
again to the indirect militarism that our 
bishop spoke about last night will be the 
answer to the problems of our com- 
munities. We who work with the poor 
Hispanic and Latino communities recog- 
nize the increased numbers of poor in our 
communities that are despairing. They're 
despairing because they've tried to get jobs 
that are meaningful and that can add dig- 



nity to their lives and to their families and 
they cannot get them. They are driven to 
other means. The increase in drugs I hap- 
pen to be part of a drug treatment program 
we are seeing a tremendous increase in 
both the selling, those that are becoming 
part of the selling sales force, as well as the 
users out of despair. The poor indeed keep 
getting poorer. This is true not only in the 
barrios and ghettos of our communities in 
America but also in the Third World-in 
Central, in South America, and in many 
places across the entire world. The root of 
our poverty, the root of our hopelessness 
is not just in the barrios and in the ghettos, 
it comes out of the oppression against the 
Third World, and our brothers and sisters 
are driven to come, hopefully finding some 
justice, finding some relief here, only to 
encoimter not only the racism from the 
Whites but racism from those of us, from 
many of us who are native-bom ethnics, 
who look at them sometimes as outsiders. 
We need to go beyond simply noting and 
analyzing and providing the rhetoric that 
makes us feel bad about the situation. 
Most of us were shocked indeed with the 
L.A. verdict in the light of the overwhelm- 
ing evidence. I would like to submit that 
we, the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church, are the jury who will 
decide our priorities for ministry and mis- 
sion as a church of Jesus Christ The 
evidence of human need and challenge for 
mission is before us in the documents, in 
the proposals and the resolutions and in 
the testimonies and sharing that we will 
give to one another. What will be the ver- 
dict? Good words and charity will not be 
sufficient because that will not feed the 
himgry or bring sight to the blind or free 
the oppressed. Only the full commitment 
of the church will do. What we decide at 
this General Conference will determine 
what our local churches will do. Let us do 
the right thing. 

SHARON RHODES-WICKETT 

(Califomia-Padfic): Sisters and brothers, 
hi, I'm Sharon Rhodes-Wickett, member 
of the Califomia-Padfic Annual Con- 
ference, superintending a district of 
which part has burned down, I want to tell 
you one of the Easter stories that has come 
out of the violence in our land. Friday, I 
got a call from one of our pastors who 
serves a church in Compton, and Com- 
pton was one of the areas hard hit And 
she said, "Pastor, I want your permission." 
Bishop May, she said, "I want your permis- 
sion to dedare oursdves as a saving sta- 
tion." I said, "Go on ahead, let's go." And 



140 



May 6, 1992 



Saturday they leafleted the community, 
thQT made lota of phone calls, and thqr set 
eveiything up. I joined them Sunday 
morning at 9 o'clock for the opening of the 
saving station. And what a wonderfiil 
event that was! But my journey, my 9-mile 
joum^ from my house to that church, was 
a valley that I drove through before arriv- 
ing at the church. My heart sank more into 
despair as I drove down the street and saw 
the barricades and saw the soldiers with 
their fatigues on and the camouflage 
makeup on their faces, and their guns 
weren't in any kind of holder. They were 
held like this as I drove down the street 
and I thought, "Oh, my Lord, what's hap- 
pened to our community?" And I pulled up 
to Compton Enterprise Church. And out 
on the front lawn there were tables set up 
with flowers and fresh paper on the tables 
to welcome the visitors and the members 
of the community. They had 8 stations set 
up for social service, involving the people 
in the church who are social workers and 
nurses and other kinds of professions. 
And they brought people in. There was a 
station for hot meals that they needed 
food to eat right then, another station to 
take home a bag of groceries, and lots of 
things for babies. There was a medical 
services station for blood pressvu-e check 
and blood sugar. There was a clothing area 
where they could go and pick out some 
clothes to wear. There was an Upper 
Room prayer ministry where they could go 
and receive the comfort that members of 
the congregation were giving. There was a 
station for shut-ins, so that if someone 
couldn't come th^ would go to them. And 
there was a place for child care so that the 
children of the workers and those who 
came could be cared for as they were 
having their needs met. After a couple of 
hotirs of workingthe stations-and I would 
add that each person who came was es- 
corted from station to station by those of 
us who worked there-then we had wor- 
ship. Oh, did we have worship! And my 
heart was lifted. My heart was lifted 
higher than it had been in quite awhile. 
Because we were reminded of the 
promises of God on which we stand and 
which we have our being. And nothing, 
and nothing would shake us from those 
promises. And as I began to leave that 
afternoon more food, and more clothing, 
and money was coming in from surround- 
ing churches to help this saving station. 
And as I left, yes, I drove past more bar- 
ricades, and I drove past more guns and 
more fatigues. But this time my heart 



didn't sink quite as low, because I was 
reminded that we are a people of God and 
that we stand on the rock-solid promise of 
God's covenant to be our people no matter 
what. And as I left I thought of the sign 
that you read as you leave Compton 
Enterprise which is, "Without a doubt 
well know that we have been revived 
when we shall leave this place." 

(song) 

BORIS K TRAJKOVSKI (Yugoslavia 
Provisional): I want to say it's a great 
pleasiu-e for me, dear bishops, dear 
delegates, to say my stoiy and to say my 
witness. I want to introduce myself. I am 
coming from Yugoslav Annual Conference 
and my name is Boris Tr^ovski, Boris 
TngkovskL When I prepare myself for my 
coming here, I was so glad to have come in 
your state, where everything is already 
done. But first days of my coming my 
heart was broken and I'm too sorrowing, 
I'm too unhappy about all these things 
what are going here. I want to point out a 
few things. All this work is going to discuss 
very familiar words, "For then, what is this 
freedom and democraqr?" I can give you 
my point of view. What is democraqr? 
Democracy. There is not democracy 
without freedom. Progress. There is not 
progress without democracy. Creativity. 
There is not creativity without freedom. 
Security. There is not security without 
negotiation and solidarity. Dependence. 
The progress, the secnirity, and the 
creativity can only be achieved by depend- 
ence. All human beings, I think, depend 
from this motto, what we can take from 
the Bible. "Do to the others what you ex- 
pect thqr should be doing to you." Do you 
want to learn our history, what is going on 
in Yugoslavia? Do you want to repeat your 
history from your past, to return yourself 
in very well-known Civil War from yoxu" 
past. My country is now in this time in 
misunderstanding. Everywhere is imrest. 
People are unhappy. Everyone ia looking 
for freedom. In every human being is very 
common discord. What is freedom? 
Human rights, and everything. The 
children are not able to er\joy their 
childhoocL All people are not able to spend 
the rest of their lives. Many dangers. Many 
people must leave their homes, their 
residence You know that there are 
thousands and thousands deaths. Many 
people are unhappy. What is the main 
problem in our country? Everybo^ is 
going to end it by himself. I belong to the 



Croation, I am from the Serbian nation, I 
am from the Macedonian natioru 
Everybocfy in his own way, but nobo^'s 
ready to come together and to negotiate. I 
know that this story is not from now, it's 
from our past I know that our regime has 
done many things about this, because th^ 
didn't make a right choice, to teach the 
people through negotiation [unintel- 
ligible] to give them a right direction in 
their life. Now, here in this state we have 
many pcjssibilities to give to the people a 
right way. Through negotiation, to teach 
the people, to invite the people to come 
together and to sit at the same table and 
to find the same solutiorL 

TRAJKOVSKI: I know that everybody 
from this state as in my country as well, 
have their own view about all things for 
their creativity of ec^onomic justice and 
political justice. But, we must brush out 
everything and throw out everything in 
front of the gospel and to come together. 
I want to encourage you and to advise you 
that you must be as a picture in this world. 
Because I'm coming from this side of the 
world, and all people are turning their face 
in United States. And now what is going 
on, many people are disappointed with 
this; the great teacher lost his mind. We 
must come together and to teach each 
other and to share our witnesses. May God 
help us to come together and to find a good 
solution. Thank you. 

ROBERT SMITH (California-Pacific): 
Bishop and members of the Conference, 
I'm Robert Smith, California-Pacific An- 
nual Conference. I serve as the superin- 
tendent of the Los Angeles District of the 
California-Pacific Annual Conference. I 
really feel a little bit uneasy about being at 
the city of General Conference today, be- 
cause I feel as though I need to be in Los 
Angeles with my people. I serve a district 
that has 48 churches. I have 20 White 
churches; 14 African-American churches. 
I have 11 Korean churches, ministries, 
missions. I have a First German church. I 
have a Chinese church. I have two 
Japanese-American churches. I have a 
Samoan church, and I have several 
Hispanic congregations, some primarily 
Mexican-American, some Cuban, and 
other varieties of Spanish-speaking 
peoples. And I have a Native American 
ministry in the Los Angeles district Ours 
is a most unique and peculiar and special 
district in the whole connection. A 
microcosm, I believe, of what God is trying 
to make of all humankind. God is at work 
in the world. God is at work in the world. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 3 



141 



God, God ifl at work in the world seeking 
to make of all humankind members of 
God's one family, and we're a microcosm 
of that Wednesday evening, we were 
going about routine district business seek- 
ing to hire a program associate, and got 
the news that the verdict came down not 
guilty, not guilty, not guilty, not guilty. We 
Could not believe what we heard. We has- 
tened to end our business and to get the 
people home, because already we began to 
hear the sirens of police cars and fire 
trucks. And we know that the stage had 
been set because oiu- blessed police chief 
Danyl Gates, had already beefed up his 
forces to be ready for the outbreak, in case, 
in case the verdict would be not guilty. 
And so, aU of our people went home. I went 
home and began to call all of my people to 
make sure that they had gotten home all 
right, and then to call all of my pastors in 
the affected areas as the news was coming 
through, to fmd out what the conditions 
were. We received the reports, we talked 
up until midnight, trying to make sure; in 
some areas we could not get through. We 
were watching television and the like, and 
the focus on the first evening-aside from 
the Florence and Normandy site, one 
block away from where my secretary lives 
where the driver was pulled out of the 
truck and beaten in the streets, and where 
the first service station was torched-aside 
from that scene, the focus primarily was 
in downtown Los Angeles, around City 
Hall, around police headquarters, around 
the Federal Building. What we saw on 
television were young Blacks, young 
Latinos, young Whites, young Asians in 
the downtown area. And so we listened to 
this all night long, and the next day in a 
2-hour period, we were on the phone call- 
ing all of our pastors to come together in 
downtown Los Angeles, 1010 South 
Florence Street, in the heart of the whole 
thing. We must talk about this. We must 
dialogue about this. We must share our 
feelings. We must plan a strategy as to how 
we are going to respond to the need which 
we now fmd in front of us. Thirty-six of my 
pastors came. One of my pastors at USC, 
Trisha Ferris said, "I cannot come. I have 
to stay here with the students. I have to be 
a pastor on this campus." My campus pas- 
tor at UCLA said, "I cannot come. I must 
be here with the students." The pastor 
from Ocean Park in Santa Monica said, "I 
I cannot come. I will be in South Central 
L.A. looking around." As the pastors sat 
and talked we shared our feelings; we 
shared our hurt; we shared our anger; we 



shared our despair. We shared why it was 
that people were being destructive, and 
why it was that people were committing, 
people were committing death. And we 
felt that if we were going to be the church 
of Jesus Christ in that setting, we had to 
do certain things. We had to offer a state- 
ment And that statement is entitled, "Out 
of Anger, Despair, Destruction, and 
Death, We Are Issuing a Call to Hope and 
to Resurrection." And that statement indi- 
cates we the clergy of the L.A. District of 
The UMC join our United Methodist 
Council of Bishops whose statement we 
had received by that time to express our 
outrage at the failure of the jury to find any 
of the defendants guilty in the beating of 
Rodney King. The endorsing of the police 
misconduct in this matter is unacceptable. 
In a subtle and insidious, as wdl as in 
direct and blatant ways, the not guilty 
verdicts are expressions of racism. The 
change of venue of the trail and the 
defense strategy-a defense strategy which 
successMly sought to create in the minds 
of the jury identification with police fear- 
-produced a gross miscarriage of justice 
We share the rage from which the violence 
in our streets has sprung. Though we 
deeply regret its consequences, and we 
commit ourselves to be in ministry with 
those who have suffered further because 
of that, the response of violence in our city 
is not to the verdict, but is triggered by the 
verdict and is fed by the continued and 
historic inequity of the distribution of 
wealth of power and justice in our nation. 
ROBERT SMITH: In response to these 
events and to the God whom we know in 
Jesus Christ, we the pastors of the Los 
Angeles district commit ourselves to 
transform our outrage into courage 
through a whole series of actions which we 
propose, which we committed ourselves 
to, which we drew up and distributed to all 
of our churches in the Los Angeles district 
for use on Sunday morning. And then 
leaving the confmes of my office, I drove 
into south central L.A., and I saw the fires 
and I saw the looting and I saw the burn- 
ing in the heart of south central There I 
was in my old 1972 Buick Electra, identify- 
ing Mdth the community in their pain and 
their hurt and to my surprise, I did not see 
just Black youths looting, but I saw all 
kinds of people looting. Many of them, our 
new neighbors in the downtown. We have 
in the downtown area, Little Central 
America. We now have Koreatown to join 
with Little Tolqro and Chinatown. We 
have more than 400,000 Salvadorans, 



100,000 Guatemalans, many of whom are 
undocumented, cannot access the system, 
cannot get social services, do not have 
decent housing, do not have legal protec- 
tion, many of them who set up street ven- 
dors and the police drive them off the 
streets and the dty ordinances say they 
cannot be there. So that when once the 
violence broke out, it seemed triggered by 
the verdict, then eveiybody it seems who 
had a cause joined in and the looting 
began. And the fires began and my friends, 
I am concerned that while it was all over 
Los Angeles, south central, downtown, 
and as Jim Lawson had said, in Hol- 
lywood, in the West Side, and the like, our 
news media has been very careful, very 
careful to portray young Blacks and the 
burned-out Korean merchants so as to 
exacerbate the already veiy high level of 
tension between Koreans and African- 
Americans in the dty of Los Angdes. And 
I think, I think it's unfair, it is ungodly, it 
is unconsdonable, it is unjust This is not, 
this is not what it is all about We share 
the hurt and the pain of so many of our 
Korean merchants who were burned out, 
but many other merchants were burned 
out and, my friends, many of the Korean 
merchants who were burned are in chur- 
ches on our Los Angeles district, and we 
must do something about it I did a second 
visit into the heart of south central L.A. 
and saw power out, water in the streets, 
devastation everywhere. In the residential 
areas, no destruction, primarily commer- 
dal and business. My pastor said to me, we 
have to be present in the community now 
in the midst of the storm. If you are not 
present now, don't come when the storm 
is all over. You can't get into the com- 
munity as a part of the aflermath, you 
have to be there in the midst of the storm; 
otherwise, I hate to think of what could 
happen. And so my pastor planned the 
response, and we said that Holman 
Church would be designated as an area 
where food might be collected, and so 
hundreds of pounds of food have been 
brought into Holman. Pampers and all 
kinds of artides to meet human need has 
been brought into Holman. We estab- 
lished four sanduary churches: Faith 
Church at 108th and Western; Hamilton 
Church in the heart of south central; Ver- 
mont Square in the very heart of south 
central; and Korean Central, which is on 
the near east side near downtown in front 
of which all the businesses were burned 
and looted, not by Blacks. And so I did a 
third visit into the area on Saturday mom- 



142 



May 6, 1992 



ing and this time I went into Koreatown 
80 1 could see what was going on. And I was 
just ahead of the march in Koreatown, but 
I was there because one of my churches, 
Wilshire Church-multi-cultural, multi-eth- 
nic, multi-radal, Black, Hispanic, Filipino, 
Korean, with a pastor for each ministry: 
(an En^ish person clergy for the senior 
pastor, English person American) 
English-American person, a senior pastor; 
a Black woman associate pastor for the 
English ministiy; and then a Korean pas- 
tor and a Filipino pastor and a Hispanic 
pastor. They had organized themselves to 
go into Koreatown and join with the clean- 
up movement and so they engaged in 
dean-up in Koreatown and for the first 
time, my English-American senior pastor 
said that he and his spouse, who is also 
clergy in our district, said, we felt like we 
were in the minority, like my wife and I 
when we were in Ireland. We were march- 
ing in a peace march and we said we would 
slip into the crowd inconspicuously. An 
update on the food situation. I talked with, 
we did create a strategy group and that 
group is implementing our plan right now. 
That is why I can feel safe in leaving and 
coming to the General Conference and so 
I talked with the coordinator and he said 
the food at Holman is exhausted. We don't 
have any more, we need more food. He 
said that Faith Church was the recipient 
of aU the contributions of food from the 
office of Senator Diane Watson. He said 
that Vermont Square had received a truck 
load of food from Ralph's Supermarket 
and that all of it had been given away, and 
he said that Hamilton is getting up to 
speed and the Korean Central Church is 
seeking to coimsel persons about getting 
loans for small businesses in order to re- 
store the businesses in Koreatown. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Take our proper 
places and return our attention to the 
microphone and our leader Beverly. Are 
you out there listening? Let's return to our 
places and give our attention to Beverly. 

SHAMANA: I'm sure that your time of 
sharing with each other has been en- 
lightening and a rich tima I do have to 
apologize, however, that we will not be 
able to have individuals come to the 
microphone due to the press of time. We 
had very much looked forward to this and 
I'm sure that some of you have things that 
are on your heart that you want to share 
with the entire body. Perhaps we can fmd 
some way to do that in corgunction with 
some of our legislative time. I do apologize 
for that because we had hoped that we 



would be able to do it. But at this time I do 
need to provide for the time when Bishop 
Kelly will come and bring us closing mo- 
ments, and so in order to do that I move 
to suspend the rules to permit her to come 
before us. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Is that right now or is 
that at the close? 

SHAMANA: That will be at the con- 
clusion of the resolutions. 

BISHOP LEWIS: You aU understand 
that this is a motion to suspend the rules 
so that Bishop Leontine Kelly may make 
a concluding speech when we're ready for 
that. It takes a 2/3 vote and it's not 
debatable. If you would sustain that you 
may vote now. You got a green light? 
When the light's green vote yes or no to 
suspend the rules. Yes 692, no 181, absten- 
tion 4, so it's clearly suspended. 

LAWSON: Bishop Lewis, we have 5 
brief motions and I would like to begin 
moving the fu^t one. That the legislative 
committees be asked to locate and mark 
specific issues already in their agendas 
that impact upon this matter, that they 
highlight them and lift them up and report 
them back to the General Conference in 
their reports. That's my first motion. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right Do you aU 
understand this motion? Are you ready to 
vote? Please vote when the light appears. 
Well, the vote is 714 yes, 169 no and 29 
abstentions. 

LAWSON: The second motion, Bishop, 
is that the Council of Bishops address an 
urgent pastoral letter for aU congregations 
of the denomination asking that Pen- 
tecost be a weekend of prayer and fasting 
for the entire church. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right. You hear 
this motion. Are you ready to vote on it? 
Please vote when the light appears; 770 
yes, 147 no, with 14 abstentions. 

LAWSON: The third motion, that the 
General Conference issue a message to the 
nation and that we select now a General 
Conference Task Force to write that mes- 
sage. And we have created a list of names 
that we would suggest might be on that 
message committee. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right, do you hear 
this motion? Are you ready to vote on it? 
Please vote when the light appears: 681 
yes, 237 no, with 17 abstentions. 

LAWSON: No. 4, that we fast, this mo- 
tion was passed on yesterday but we want 
to repeat it to remind us, we fast Thursday 
evening before supper and then for 24 
hours; we give our savings to UMCOR or 
as directed by the Council of Bishops. 



BISHOP LEWIS: Ready to vote? Please 
vote when the light appears. The count is 
638 yes, 252 no, with 44 abstentions. 

LAWSON: No. 5, that the Council of 
Bishops caU The United Methodist 
Church to the Pentecost Weekend of fast- 
ing and prayer, a motion alrea^ passed, 
and that they ask for an offering from 
every congregation; 50% of which would 
remain in the annual conference; 50% to 
UMCOR or as directed by the Council of 
Bishops. And Bishop, I would move that if 
this is sustained then that we refer this to 
GCF&A for ite perusal. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Because that is stand- 
ard procedure for us and it wiU be a part 
of your motion. Alright Are you ready to 
vote? I have someone at my lefl. Go to 
microphone 11; weU, or 6, that's aU right 

GEORGE CARUSO (North Indiana): 
Bishop, I'm bothered; this is a sort of point 
of order, and I'm not sure if I'm in order 
or not. When this was proposed as an 
agenda item, the implication was, as I un- 
derstood it, there would be time to 
respond. And I appreciate the exceUent 
presentation that's been given to us, but 
we've been denied the opportunity of 
responding. WiU that be provided? Is that 
a point of order? Do we have to move it for 
the Agenda Committee, or what can be 
done? I feel disenfranchised as a member 
of this General Conference; I was not al- 
lowed to respond. (Applause) 

LAWSON: Bishop, I think our group 
agrees, but we were trying to do it within 
the time limit and we overran the time, 
and so we were trying to compress it so 
that we could finish by the 12:30 hour. Of 
course, it's 12:00 now, so as far as I'm 
concerned there can be responses if we 
want to do it We did not want to come 
back with motions at another session. 

BISHOP LEWIS: It's been suggested 
that if we vote on the motions, we may 
have a little time for some response. But 
we opted to go with the motions so they 
wouldn't be lefl out, and if they go as weU 
as the other 4 have, we've got about 10 
minutes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Are you ready to vote? 

SMITH: My friends, what we had on the 
shelves is exhausted and we need more 
resources, and therefore we caU upon this 
Greneral Conference to make some kind of 
response. I am sure that everyone of you 
here wants to write a check for $10, for 
$15, for $25, but I need more $100 gifts. I 
need $1,000 gifts to go to Los Angeles to 
meet human need. And then my friends, 
as this General Conference is seeking to 



( 



Daily Edition VoL 4 No. 3 



143 



respond to this whole matter, let me say 

»to you, you as a church, we as a church, 
very often act like we have flnished deal- 
ing with the urban ministries agenda. I say 
to you we have not yet finished with the 
urban ministries agenda. We must devote 
connectional resources to address the 
mass human needs in the urban scene. In 
our annual conference we are getting 
ready to mount a nugor f\md drive. We're 
hoping to raise $25 million. We're devot- 
ing 30% of that to the School of Theology 
at Cliu^mont. The rest is to go for con- 
gregational development strategy across 
the whole conference. Much of that is to 
go into bricks and mortar and land, but 
the L.A. district said no, that is not where 
the concerns are. We must develop a con- 
gregational development strategy in the 
dty of Los Angeles that will address 5 
m^or program areas: immigration and 
refugee concerns to meet the needs of the 
new neighbors that we have in the dty; 
homelessness and affordable housing; 
families at risk in south central L.A., in 
east L.A. and all over the dty; churches 
covenanting together to address the whole 
question of drugs and substance abuse; 
and multiple ministries for regional chur- 
ches through reconfigurations in the 
south central Los Angeles area. My 
friends, we have not yet completed the 
urban agenda. I call you, let us get back to 
the urban agenda. 

RHODES-WICKETT: I invite you now 
to join with us on verse 4 of our h)rmn, and 
I suspect we might like to stand as we sing 
this 4th verse 

(hymn) 

BEVERLY SHAMANA (California- 
Pacific): My name is Beverly Shamana, 
and I am the Assodate Council Director in 
the Calif omia-Pacific Annual Conference. 
Bishop, members of the General Con- 
ference, we have heard many diverse and 
passionate and moving testimonies to 
what has happened this past week and it 
calls to mind a phrase that has been echo- 
ing in my head and in my heart from 
yesterday's most powerful worship, the 
phrase being "to fill the needs of others as 
acutely as your own," and from your 
response to these various witnesses, you 
have done that You have fdt the needs of 

Xthers as acutely as your own. This gather- 
ig of General Conference offers us a uni- 
que opportunity, one which we may not 
find oursdves in for a long time, and that 
is an opportunity to talk with other people 



fVom other conferences, from other parts 
of the world, from other parts of the 
country, from other cultures, from other 
races, about what is on our heart, what has 
been motivated, what has been inspired, 
what these witnesses have engendered in 
UB. By this day of General Conference we 
know the persons in front of us very well 
by the shape of their neck. I would like to 
offer us an opportunity to get to know the 
shape of their soul. And so I want to ask 
you to do 3 things. Number 1 is to form a 
small group of 4, 5, 8, 7 people, whereby 
you can share what this has meant to you. 
That is to say, how have you experienced 
the human condition of violence, of 
despair, of looting in your own setting, in 
your own church, in your own community, 
in your own family, in your jobs, in your 
cherished relationships. What shape has 
that taken in your setting? This is the 
common thread that we all share. The 
second thing I'd like you to do is to build 
a bridge for each other and with each 
other from your discussion to the various 
resolutions that you are aware of that we 
can impact by what has happened and 
what wiU impact us in the dajrs ahead. And 
then the third thing after about 10 
minutes that we are going to ask you to do 
is to share, at an open microphone, 
whatever insights, whatever learnings, 
whatever leanings come out of yoiir dis- 
cussion together that you would like the 
whole conference to hear. We will open 
the microphones for a brief time And 
finally I would say to let the Spirit do the 
translating. I urge you to speak candidly 
out of your own heart, guided by the grace 
and the Spirit that can transform our 
hearing and our speaking. So I would ask 
you now to talk to each other across 
delegations. We don't want Georgia talk- 
ing to Georgia and California to Califor- 
nia, but if you can even move around a 
little bit so that you can talk across geog- 
raphy, so that there can be the kind of 
cross fertilization that informs us all. I 
would invite the side sections, those areas 
beyond the bar of the conference, to form 
some groups to talk so that we can bind 
and link up to each other in this way, as 
we are bound to Christ and to the church. 
I think we can do it Let's tiy it, let's try it 
Let's just move around a little bit and talk 
to each other and share. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Hold, hold your seats 
a moment. We have someone at 
microphone 14, and I'm going to recognize 
you and then we're gonna do this, depend- 
ing on what happens here, but you're sup- 



posed to be recognized from your seat and 
then come to the microphone. Well, I said 
I'm going to now, but I'm telling you that 
for the benefit of everyone. Okay, go 
ahead. 

CHESTER JONES (Little Rock): Mr. 
Chairperson and ddegates of the con- 
ference, 

BISHOP LEWIS: Tell us who you are 

JONES: I'm Chester Jones from Little 
Rock, Arkansas. And I would just like to 
add another thing to this because all of the 
information has been very good and very 
insightful, and if most of you are like I am: 
you have watched tdevision and you have 
pretty well picked up on most of the infor- 
mation and that's good because all of us 
are paralyzed with it. 

BILL CROUCH (North Texas): Ques- 
tion as to the motion that we take an 
offering, can you be more specific about 
that? To what would it be intended? 
What's the point? 

LAWSON: The offering would be direct 
50% remaining in the Annual Conference 
for ministries related to this matter in 
their own area, 50% to UMCOR as 
directed by the Council of Bishops. We 
hesitate about this because, while the im- 
mediate needs we must meet-that is, food, 
dothing, shelter, and so forth and so on- 
that there's also the whole business of 
rebuilding, of work for change, so that we 
don't want to make it inflexible (the offer- 
ing), so that it goes only to emergency 
relief, but to make it also possible to be 
used for other kinds of ministries and mis- 
sion. 

GEORGE CARUSO: I simply wanted to 
give you the opportunity to tell us what we 
are giving our money for. Thank you. 

LAWSON: Thank you. I recognize at 
Microphone 3. Yes, go ahead, Joe. 

C. JOSEPH SPRAGUE (West Ohio): I 
move to amend by addition, if that's in 
order. 

LAWSON: It is. 

SPRAGUE: That in solidarity and con- 
sultation with indigenous persons and 
local chiut:hes in a sdected neighborhood. 
The United Methodist Church commit it- 
self to the creation in Los Angeles of a 
"shalom zone." A shalom zone would be 
one strategically-located dty block or its 
equivalent rebuilt with the necessary 
buildings, businesses, and sodal services 
needed for life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
meaning. To create this shalom zone. The 
United Methodist Church, working 
through the national division, would issue 
a call posthaste for staff and volunteers. 



144 



May 6, 1992 



money such as that just mentioned, and 
the material, love, and labor to rebuild 
both physical structures and human lives 
broken by the cycle of poverty and 
deprivation. The response to this call in 
money and people would be coordinated 
through the Los Angeles Planning and 
Strategy Conmiittee. Let the call go forth 
for workers with children and youth, com- 
munity organizers, M.D.'s, nurses, den- 
tists, counselors, lawyers, business people, 
architects, contractors, plumbers, 
electricians, and all who are willing to 
help. To this army of shalom would be 
added an intentional remnant of persons 
small in number, but large in the love of 
Jesus, who would commit themselves to 
live as neighbors and iirban missioners in 
the shalom zone for an extended period of 
time so as to claim the shalom zone for 
Christ. Once this model is in the process 
of being developed. The United Methodist 
Church would invite the ecumenical and 
interfaith communities of this nation to 
duplicate our effort by creating similar 
zones of hope. This proposal, to be 
referred to the Legislative Section on 
Global Ministries for the development of 
implementing strategies, attendant 
budgets, and reported to GCNFA and to 
the plenary as soon as possible 

BISHOP LEWIS: If there is a second? 

SPRAGUE: I don't think I need to speak 
any further. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, it has a 
second. Does the committee wish to 
respond? 

LAWSON: Well, we heard the spirit, 
Joe, of that. Bishop, we heard the spirit 
from Joe Pennel's amendment and we are 
prepared to accept it and incorporate it to 
the best of our ability. 

BISHOP LEWIS: The committee says 
they will accept that amendment. Is that 
right? 

LAWSON: Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Are you ready to vote? 
All who will . . . Well, please vote when the 
light appears. I've got a big sign right here 
in front of me if I were smart enough to 
read it. And the vote is 631 yes, 265 no, 31 
abstentions. 

LAWSON: We have the main motion 
before us now. Bishop. That was an 
amendment. 

BISHOP LEWIS: No. 

LAWSON: No? 

BISHOP LEWIS: That was a main mo- 
tion. 

LAWSON: OK We accepted it. 



BISHOP LEWIS: You accepted it and 
that's it. 

LAWSON: We have been asked to an- 
nounce that we want to emphasize the fact 
that already many, many ... for many, 
many agencies of the church, we have 
received resources and offers of solidarity 
and a willingness to be able to plan and 
work with our Los Angeles Area. But we 
want to remember that there are other 
areas also in great need, San Francisco as 
an example. UMCOR has already sent the 
first $50,000 first grant to the Cal-Pac 
Conference. They have already estab- 
lished an advance number and that nimi- 
ber is 901735-2. 901735-2 is the advance 
number. It should also be said that Church 
World Service has been in conversations 
with many of our people, with our con- 
gregations, our leadership in the area, and 
that a variety of other kinds of Protestant, 
primarily church organizations and con- 
cerned groups have been in conversation. 
We appreciate that very much. And now, 
I think, to bring the concluding reflection 
is Bishop Leontine KeUy. 

BISHOP LEONTINE KELLY: I think 
we have heard the word. Tonight, remem- 
ber the words of Henri Nouwen, "When a 
little boy asked the prophet, 'Dear 
prophet, why do you keep prophesying 
when nobody listens to your words and 
when nobody changes their life?' And the 
answer that question was and always will 
be, 'I prophesy not simply to change the 
world, but to prevent the world from 
changing me.' " It seems to me, that as we 
in this General Conference come together 
that what we are about all week is not only 
the awareness of what has happened in a 
particular place, in Los Angeles, and in 
San Francisco, and ripples in other areas, 
but to imderstand that we as a country sit 
on a powder keg, the chickens have come 
home to roost, we look not only historical- 
ly, but biblically and theologically, in 
temjs of what our task is, what our man- 
date is, as disciples of Jesus Christ, and 
that is to love one another and we have not 
done it. And yet we have the opportimity, 
and what a witness of diversity we are as 
we sit together here! What a democratic 
opportunity this is! What a democratic 
instrument this is as the General Con- 
ference of The United Methodist Church! 
One of the most democratic institutions in 
the world. And we need to go home and 
help people understand what it meiins to 
be United Methodist. It is not to affirm 
their fears, it is to disturb their comfort so 
that they might live out their fidth. Just a 



few things. If we do not prioritize educa- 
tion in this country, for all children and 
for all people, we wiU never come to an 
understanding. We have 1^ ... we have . 
. . You don't have to applaud me, just let 
me finish a minute. We have left . . . dare 
to leave the educational funding of our 
country to the lottery, because they 
promised it. As Methodists, we have never 
sustained gambling, but if you are going to 
have lotteries, I want to put defense on 
lotteries and put money in our budgets to 
educate people. We are a democracy. We 
cannot be a democracy if we do not know 
that fundamental to any democratic 
freedom-justice process is an under- 
standing of what we are about, and we 
should be about the business of that 
When a young man said to me, and many 
of you heard me say it, ayoung commimity 
director said to me, "Bishop Kelly, don't 
you understand that the gang system in 
this country is to the crime syndicate as 
the Junior Achievement Program is to 
corporate America?" It is not that our 
children cannot learn what it means to be 
moral, spiritual people, it is that we have 
tolerated who will teach them. As I stood 
in Jones United Methodist Church and 
preached a funeral of a 23-year-old Black 
man, shot down by drive-by shooting. I 
counted 45 young Black males between 
the ages 17 and 24 as they came into the 
church to the funeral of their brother. 
There they were in full dress, burgundy 
bow ties, burgundy boutonnieres, burgim- 
dy cummerbimds. I thought to myself, "It 
looks like a prom scene, but I know it is 
the Godfather." And that is the symbol of 
our country, and that is the model of 
violence that we have sustained in our 
public arena and in our militarism and 
with our thinking this week contextual- 
ized by the Bishops' statement, the 
Bishops' vision, the Bishops' commitment 
to the total picture, we have an agenda to 
work on. Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. Lord, have 
mercy upon us. We cannot afford to be the 
church that in the 18th centuiy was ac- 
cused of being seditious, because it dared 
to stand in 18th century England for mar- 
ginalized people. We umnot claim that 
history and continue to be such a comfort- 
able, pure church. We cannot be ministers 
of the gospel if we are not willing to hit the 
streets where the people ara 

(Continued next issue) 



f 



(I 



Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Friday, May 8th, 1992 



Vol.4 No. 4 



Delegates Continue to Work Diligently 



In 1988 the General Conference heard about 1,500 
acres of land in Zimbabwe and a dream. Thursday, the 
story was different. 

"We now have a staff, faculty, teaching building, 
and students," the Rev. Roger Ireson, general secretary 
of the General Board of Higher Education and Minis- 
try, said in a report on Africa University, the first 
higher education facility sponsored on that continent 
by United Methodists. 

The approximately 40 students are pursuing careers 
in agriculture. Additional studies are expected to be in 
place by the time the 1996 General Conference con- 
venes in Denver, and construction of dormitories and 
classroom buildings will have been completed, Ireson 
said. Curriculum is in an African context. 

The education executive paid tribute to other gen- 
eral agencies of the church for their cooperation in tell- 
ing the story of Africa University and to annual 
conferences and local churches for their financial sup- 
port. Other speakers included Bishop Emilio de Car- 
valho of Angola, recently elected first chancellor of the 
university; the Rev. Yemba Kekumba of Zaire, dean of 
the theology faculty; Angella Current, head of the Gen- 
eral Board of Higher Education and Ministry's scholar- 
ship department; and Bishop Roy C. Nichols who is 
assisting in a scholarship endowment drive. 







Agenda 






Friday, May 8 


8:30 


a.m. 


Worship 


9:00 


a.m. 


Committee on Agenda 
Nominations 
Committee on Courtesies 
Committee on Presiding Officers 
Announcements 


9:30 


a.m. 


Plenary Adjournment 


9:45 


a.m. 


Legislative Committees 


2:30 


p.m. 


Legislative Committees 


7:30 


p.m. 


Legislative Conunittees 




JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 

James M. Lawson, Jr. (Califomia-Paoifio) stands to sp«ak the 
opening days of the 1992 General Conference. 



Delegates applauded frequently as the story of the 
university unfolded, and they rose in appreciation as 
their colleagues from Afiica moved down the center 
aisle of the plenary hall singing. 

As the rejoicing concluded, the Rev. Don Ott of Wis- 
consin, who chairs the Agenda Committee, told the 998 
lay and clergy delegates that it was "time to do a real- 
ity check" and "work diligently" on the thousands of pe- 



(continued on page 147) 



146 



May 8, 1992 



Northwest 
Texas Youth 

Choir To 
Lead Worship 




The Spirit Wind Youth Choir of the Northwest Texas Annual Conference will lead in both 
w^orship services today. 



Daily Christian 
Advocate 



Editorial Offices - Room 116 

Commonwealth Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 

near Publishing House Display 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Sheila McGee Associate Editor 

Mike Cunningham Con^uter Manager/Calendar Editor 

and Coordinator of Legislative Section Secretaries 

Rebecca Bxirgoyne Assistant Coordinator of Legislative 

Section Secretaries 
Gay! Hinton ... Compoeition Manager for Calendar and Proceedings 

Richard Street Composition Manager for News and Features 

Mochell Hughes Office Manager 

Bob Lowdermilk Coordinator of Verbatim 

Transcribers & Checkers 

Brad Motta Features Editor 

Keith Kendall Roundup Editor 

Keith Pohl Coordinator of News Reports from Legislative 

Sections & News Editor 

George Dunn Manager of Audio Transcription 

Gilbert Elam Engineer 

Glenn Hinton Xywrite Trainer 

Thelma Boeder Index Editor 

Marvin Cropsey Chief Copy Editor 

Sally Sharpe Copy Editor 

Mary Catherine Dean Copy Editor 

Vern Bigler Copy Editor 

Janet C. Lowdermilk Copy Editor 

Vern Denney Copy Editor 

Gwen Colvin Copy Editor 

Angela Butler Copy Editor 

Rochelle Blake Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap Berg Features Editor and Copy Editor 

Bob Lear News Writer 

Canulla Jones Rroduction Manager 

Juanita Belleniant Sales Manaager 

Marge Poteete Sales Representative 

Barbara Acuff Sales Representative 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

TomTozer News Writer 

Tom Potter News Writer 



The Spirit Wind Youth Choir of the Northwest 
Texas Annual Conference wiU sing in both General 
Conference worship services today at 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 
p.m. They also will present a concert at 2 p.m. in the 
sanctuary of Trinity United Methodist Church. 

The choir was established in the late 1970s as an 
outreach ministry of the conference council on youth 
ministries to enable youth to participate in a mu- 
sic/drama experience not offered by their congregations 
and to minister to area local churches through a sum- 
mer tour. Each year they sing in 12 or 13 chvirches cov- 
ering 1,500 to 2,000 miles across the conference. 

The choir is directed by Bert W. Bostic, minister of 
program music for St. Luke United Methodist Church 
in Midland, Texas, and Jon Johnson, chair of the fine 
arts department of South Plains College and director of 
music for the First United Methodist Church, Level- 
land, Texas. Debby Vester, organist/music assistant for 
St. Luke Church is accompanist for the choir and serves 
as the organist for today's worship services. 

Preacher in the 8:30 a.m. service is Bishop Ernest A. 
Fitzgerald of the Atlanta Area. Liturgist is D. Randall 
Williamson, Atlanta director of ministerial services, 
North Georgia Conference. 

Dr. Peter Weaver, senior pastor of First United 
Methodist Church, Pittsburgh, Pa., will preach at the 
2:30 p.m. service. Liturgist for this afternoon's service 
will be Shirley Parris of Brooklyn, N.Y., lay leader for 
the New York Conference. 



/f 



'^ 



"Catch the Spirit" on IISS 



J 



< 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



147 



Area United Methodist Churches 



The following congregations, located within a three-mile radius of the convention center, welcome General Con- 
ference delegates and others to join them for Sunday worship: 



Fourth Avenue United Methodist Church 

318 W. St. Catherine 

585-2176 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 10:45 a.m. 

Genesis United Methodist Church 

300 N. 42nd St. 

772-3551 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 11 a.m. 

St. Paul United Methodist Church 
10525 Old Taylorsville Road 
Jeffersontown, KY 40299 
267-4465 
Worship, noon 

Marcus Lindsey United Methodist Church 

801 E. Main St. 

584-8709 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 10:45 a.m. 

New Coke United Methodist Church 

428 E. Breckinridge 

587-0437 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 11 a.m. 



New Hope United Methodist Church 

1228 S. Jackson St. 

634-5707 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 10:45 a.m. 

R.E. Jones United Methodist Church 

2330 Algonquin Parkway 

772-3773 

Sunday school, 9:30 a.m. 

Worship, 11 a.m. 

St. Paul United Methodist Church 

2000 Douglass Blvd. 

459-1595 

Sunday school, 9:45 a.m. 

Worship, 8:25 and 10:55 a.m. 

Trinity Temple United Methodist Church 

537 S. Third St. 

585-2905 

Sunday school, 9:45 a.m. 

Worship, 10:45 a.m. 

Zion United Methodist Church 

980 Edward Ave. 

585-3857 

Sunday school, 9:15 

Worship, 10:30 a.m. 



(continued from frontpage) 

titions stored in legislative committee computers. All 
those petitions wUl have to be tvimed into calendar 
items and dealt with in plenary before the conference 
can be adjourned May 15. 

In a brief business session before convening in com- 
mittees, delegates declined to set an order of the day for 
Monday to consider all petitions related to homosexual- 
ity and abortion. When the delegates had completed 
their electronic voting, the big screen at the front of the 
hall showed the motion had received 521 "no" votes 
against 427 "yes." The issues now will come to the floor 
at a time to be determined later. 

Two other motions from the floor were approved. 
One called on general agency heads to report cost re- 
ductions achieved during the past four years, and an- 
ticipated reductions for the 1993-96 quadrennium. The 
other asked for a report on general agency stafif present 
in the conference, and related expenses. 

An estimated 500 persons attended the quadrennial 
luncheon sponsored by the North American Section of 
the World Methodist Council. The council presented its 
"Seat of Honor" accolade to Daniel D. Hankey, an At- 
lanta physician; the Rev. Norman E. Dewire, president 



of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio; and the 
Rev. Maxie D. Dunnam, pastor of Christ United Meth- 
odist Church in Memphis, Tenn. 

The battery of computers clicked throughout the 
Commonwealth Convention Center Thursday afternoon 
and night as delegates worked on the petitions. Most of 
the legislative committees divided into smaller units to 
expedite the process. 

In late afternoon the Judicial Council released two 
decisions carried from earlier dockets. In one, the 
church's highest court said that a plan governing com- 
pensation for general agency staff personnel applied to 
the General Board of Pensions and the General Board 
of Publication, as well as the 11 other agencies. The 
other decision dealt with the salary of the president of 
an annual conference foundation. 

The nine-member Judicial Council is in session 
throughout General Conference to adjudicate questions 
relating to constitutionality of pending legislation. Tom 
Matheny, Hammond, La., attorney, is council president. 

— Robert Lear 



148 



May 8, 1992 




JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 

J. Walter Ellisor (Alabama-West Florida) inquires about Disciple: 
Into the Word Into the World at the Disciple booth in the 
Cokesbury Resource Center. Celinda J. Hughes, Cokesbury staff 
member, responds. Disciple celebrates its fifth anniversary this 
year. 




Radio Stars United Methodists 

The General Conference radio news staff continues 
to receive requests from stations for persons to be inter- 
viewed for news stories and talk shows. 

That's only one of the radio services being offered for 
General Conference. The basic radio news source is a 
toll-free number that was mailed last month to 1,000 
stations across the United States. Other stations were 
contacted by annual conferences who have arranged for 
customized interviews to be "fed" by telephone at pre- 
arranged times. 

This is the first General Conference where a con- 
certed effort is being made to provide news to Hispanic 
radio stations. Almost 300 Spanish-language stations 
in the United States and Puerto Rico were mailed pre- 
conference stories in Spanish. They were invited to fol- 
low General Conference activities by calling InfoServ's 
Spanish-language lines: during business hours, dial 
(800) 251-8140 and request the Spanish-language tape; 
24-hours-a-day, dial (615) 742-5425 (toll call). 

At the conclusion of General Conference, those sta- 
tions will be priority-mailed an audio-tape with several 
stories in Spanish which address general issues of the 
conference as well as decisions specifically affecting the 
Hispanic constituency. 

— Bill Richards 



i 



JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 

The Rev. Kate Bell, a pastor in the Iowa Conference and a visitor 
to this General Conference, keepe track of both the discussion 
and her needlepoint. 



Today's Book Autographing 
Sessions 

Visit the Cokesbury booth in the convention cen- 
ter, buy a book, and have it signed by the author 
during today's autographing sessions. Authors, book 
titles, and "signing" times are listed below: 

H. Eddie Fox (co-authored with George E. Morris), 
11-11:30 a.m. 
Faith Sharing 
Faith Sharing Video Kit 
Let the Redeemed of the Lord SA Y So! 

Kenneth C. Kinghom, 11-11:30 a.m. 
Gifts of the Spirit 
Gospel of Grace 

George G. Hunter III, 11-11:30 a.m. 

Church Growth 
How to Reach Secular People 
The Contagious Congregation 
To Spread the Power 

Artemio R. Guillermo, 3-3:30 p.m. 
Churches Aflame 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



149 



May 8 TV Programs Focus 
on Changing Communities, Gulfside 

Remember to tune in your hotel TV at 7-8 a.m. and 
9-10 p.m. today for United Methodist programming. 

"Why We Care," which highlights United Methodist 
response to major issues of the day, is a new weekly se- 
ries produced by United Methodist Communications 
(UMCom) for the Vision Interfaith Television Network 
(VISN). The first six programs were produced with the 
General Board of Global Ministries, while future pro- 
grams will be undertaken in cooperation with other 
agencies. 

Today "Why We Care About Changing Communi- 
ties" focuses on the efforts of congregations embracing 
the gifts of their multicultural communities. In Texas, 
churches decimated by "White flight" find new hope in 
serving their changing communities, while in Arizona, 
a church community intertwines Christian faith with 
cultural traditions, reaching people who once felt alien 
in their own land. 

"Catch the Spirit" co-hosts Anisa Mehdi and Hilly 
Hicks visit with staff members at Gulfside Assembly, a 
140-acre retreat' center located near Waveland, Miss., 
along the Gulf of Mexico. 

Founded in 1923 by Bishop Robert E. Jones, the first 
Black bishop elected as a general superintendent of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Gulfside continues to 
serve the needs of Black United Methodists as "an in- 
stitution designed for and committed to the commemo- 
ration of the contributions and heritage of Blacks in the 
historic Wesleyan tradition" and as a center for Chris- 
tian education, culture, and recreation. Gulfside has 
been a United Methodist Advance Special since 1980. 

These programs, which also include a one-minute 
General Conference news summary (repeated twice dur- 
ing the hour), can be seen on the following channels: 
Brown Hotel, Channel 8; Gait House/Gait House East, 
Channel 16; Holiday Inn Downtown, Channel 6; Hyatt, 
Channel 4; Seelbach, Channel 14; other hotels, check 
your Visitel channel. 

— Jackie Vaughan 




Bits 'n Pieces 

These items are in the "Did you know?" department. 
If you have interesting tidbits to share about General 
Conference delegates or doings, please jot them down 
and bripg them to Barbara Dunlap-Berg at the DCA 
office on the lower level of the convention center. 

* The Rev. Charles Rex Bevins, Nebraska, is chair- 
ing his fourth consecutive General Conference legisla- 
tive committee — this time as chair of the Discipleship 
Committee. He chaired Discipleship in 1988 and Global 
Ministries in 1980 and 1984. 

* The Memphis Declaration contained 171,169 sig- 
natures as of May 7. Writers of the document affirm 
that "God revealed himself in Jesus Christ, the only 
way of divine salvation; holy living is the way for 
Christians to live out the mandate of discipleship given 
by Jesus Christ; and the local congregation is the cen- 
ter for mission and ministry to the world." 

* Sisters Dora S. Washington and Rosa Washington 
are lay delegates to General Conference. Dora, a uni- 
versity administrator, hails fi-om Mississippi, while 
Rosa, an educator, represents the California-Nevada 
Conference. 

* Blisters and sore throats are the most common 
health problems plaguing General Conference partici- 
pants. (That's not surprising when you consider the 
amount of walking and talking that goes on around 
here!) An average of 30 patients per day visit the first 
aid station at the conference center, according to Dr. 
Donald Mosley, a member of St. Matthew United Meth- 
odist Church, Louisville, and one of eight volunteer 
physicians stafiing the infirmary. Also volunteering 
their medical expertise are nine Louisville-area nurses. 
The first aid station is open 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 

* If you think it's deja vu, you're partly correct. No, 
it's not 1950. And yes, the popular Endless Line of 
Splendor — last updated in 1975 — is newly revised and 
available for $6.95 fi-om the Cokesbury booth. For the 
latest version, Webb Garrison — author of the first edi- 
tion — wrote 20 new vignettes, illustrated by artist Dani 
Aguila. The 1992 version contains all of the original 
stories and art work as well as the new material. 

* Three candidates for the episcopacy chaired legis- 
lative committees during first-week sessions of General 
Conference (C. Rex Bevins and Janice Riggle Huie, 
South Central Jurisdiction, and Walter L. Kimbrough, 
Southeastern Jurisdiction); two more served as vice 
chairs (Vance Summers Jr., North Central Jurisdiction, 
and Fritz Mutti, South Central Jurisdiction); and one 
was a committee secretary (Sharon Z. Rader, North 
Central Jurisdiction). 



JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 
How many meaaages can you find in this local hotel'a sign? 



150 



May 8, 1992 



Committee Serves Generous Doses 
of Louisville Hospitality 



♦ 



With the 1992 General Conference under way, mem- 
bers of the committee responsible for serving up a gen- 
erous dose of Kentucky hospitality during the event are 
feeling "real excitement, a sense of achievement, and 
relief" 

That's the assessment of Rhoda Peters of Louisville, 
co-chair of the program division of the Local Arrange- 
ments Committee. 

"A number of people on the committee have slept, 
eaten, and breathed General Conference almost con- 
stantly for the last three months," Peters said. The 
committee has been hard at work more than two years. 

"We had a marvelous response from the delegates to 
the opening reception Monday night," Peters said, "and 
we're looking forward to this Sunday." That's when the 
host committtee will present a musical celebration cen- 
tered around the new United Methodist Hynmal. Per- 
formances, which will feature the renowned Junaluska 
Singers, are planned for 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. at downtown 
Louisville's Macauley Theater. 

"The cooperation of everyone has made our task es- 
pecially pleasant," she added. 

Volunteer power seems to be the driving force be- 
hind many of the host committee's achievements. Pe- 
ters estimated that 25 to 35 volunteers work daily as 
van drivers, first aid assistants, information desk per- 
sonnel, and hospitality room hosts. "They help to make 
the wheels go 'rovmd and keep things going day to day," 
she noted. 




Visitors to the first aid station are greeted by volunteer nurses 
and physicians such as Kay and Dick Groff. 



The volunteer force included more than 70 ministers 
who assisted with Monday night's service of Holy Com- 
munion, and the ranks will swell even more for this 
weekend's celebration. 

Volunteers have pitched in and helped in mjiny 
ways. Recruits from local churches in every district in 
the Louisville Conference assisted in baking 240,000 
cookies served in hospitality rooms this week and of- 
fered at plenary breaks next week. In response to cost- 
cutting measures, generous donors contributed all the 
ham, cheese, and biscuits for Monday evening's recep- 
tion. 

"In many cases, we simply asked and received," Pe- 
ters said. "That kind of cooperation has made this job 
exciting." 

The first days of the conference found the local ar- 
rangements staff working to insure delegates had satis- 
factory housing and were f amil iar with transportation 
options. 

"People have been surprised at the trolley service," 
Peters said. Unbeknownst to some, the trolley shuttle is 
part of the city transportation system. "But we've had 
some people comment that we sure must have gone to a 
lot of trouble to arrange to have those troUeys for the 
conference," Peters said with a laugh. 

The second week of the 1992 legislative assembly 
wiU be "a lot more routine" for the local arrangements 
staff, she predicted. Volunteers will continue to be shut- 
tled from the LouisviUe Conference offices to Common- 
wealth Convention Center, about 1 1 blocks away. Their 
main jobs wiU be staffing the information desk, dele- 
gates' lounges, and post office. 

The General Conference first aid station has been a 
busy place. It was visited by 21 persons on opening day 
of the conference. Ailments included allergic reactions, 
injiu-ies resulting from falls, and upset stomachs. 

This is the first time the first aid room has been 
staffed by both a nurse and a doctor, Peters explained. 
"We have found it to be a very helpful service," she 
said, adding that the committee plans to recommend it 
be similarly staffed at future General Conferences. 

"When you get 5,000 people together, there are a 
host of things that can happen that require medical at- 
tention," Peters said. The services provided at the first 
aid station often save on costly trips to clinics and hos- 
pital emergency rooms, she pointed out. 

A serendipitous aspect of all the preparatory work 
and hours is "the excitement of meeting aU the people 
— the bishops, foreign delegates, and so many others 
who've been just names on long lists," Peters said. "It's 
fun now to meet these people. 

"Working closely with the Commission on the Gen- 
eral Conference, the Local Arrangements Committee is 
responsible for "the on-site legwork and hospitality," 
Peters said. "Our job is doing things that make people 
feel good and have a positive experience." 



— Jane Dennis 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



151 



UMCOR Advance Special Addresses 
the Urban Crisis in Los Angeles 



Los Angeles Area relief efforts continue. At one re- 
lief center alone, by May 6, demand for filled grocery 
bags had risen to a level of 90 bags daily — at about $20 
per bag. 

Typical items needed include food staples, baby food, 
infant formula, and diapers. 

According to the L.A. Times May 5, an equal num- 
ber of bags are being distributed to those who have lost 
their jobs or their homes. 

Your gifts through UMCOR Advance #901735-2 will 
be forwarded to the California Pacific Annual Confer- 
ence and allocated to relief centers at a variety of 
churches including: Vermont Square, Holman, Korean, 
Wilshire (Pico Union Center), and Faith United Meth- 
odist churches in Los Angeles, and Enterprise Church 
in Compton. 



In addition, the following volunteers are needed in 
the area: social workers; community health workers; 
translators, especially Spanish/Korean/English; attor- 
neys familiar with California property insurance or im- 
migration law; full-time temporary office help. 

These responses address only a part of the short- 
term dimensions of the crisis. Longer-term responses 
must be explored and developed. 

For more information, contact the Los Angeles Dis- 
trict Office, the Rev. Robert Smith, superintendent; 
Gaunnie Dixon, associate; (213)-749-6310. 

— From United Methodist Ministries, Los Angeles District 



Delegates from the Baltimore and 
Southern Dlinois Conferences join 
other small groups in disoussions on 
Tuesday morning. Small-group work 
has not been used in a plenary 
session in recent memory. 




JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 




May Chun (California-Pacific) and 
Donald Ott (Wisconsin) share a 
lighter moment in the hall. 



JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 



152 



May 8, 1992 



Translators Tackle 14 Languages 



Left: Translators ^ork behind the scenes during a plenary 
session. 



Below: Wandja AFumba and Lunge Djundu (both from the 
Central Zaire Conference) listen to the proceedings using the 
translation service. 




"When we went through the Episcopal Address, 
we all said, 'What is this new word?'" Marguerite 
Wieser grinned. 

"We did not know this word connectional. We 
guessed it must be something like a network. ..a con- 
nectional church,'" she said in the Swiss accent of 
her native Geneva. 

"That is what we are trying to do here: make a 
connection," explained the coordinator of 14 transla- 
tors for all conference plenary sessions. "We want to 
be a vital part of this conference, connecting people 
who may be separated by different languages." 

Wieser and her team of translators, still undaunted 
by United Methodist jargon, are part of a group of 31 
expert Unguists interpreting the English-language dia- 
logue of the conference into six different languages for 
about 110 persons from a variety of Central Confer- 
ences and affiliated autonomous churches. The lan- 
guages include French, German, Korean, Mandarin 
Chinese, Portuguese, and Spanish. French is the 
mother tongue of delegates from Belgium, Burundi, and 
Zaire. German is native to delegates from Germany and 
Austria as well as a second language elsewhere in 
Europe. Mandarin Chinese is spoken by Taiwanese; 
Portuguese by delegates from Angola and Mozambique, 
and Spanish by representatives from Argentina, Bo- 
livia, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, and Mexico. 

How does an interpreter manage to think in two lan- 
guages, listen, and talk simultaneously? Barbel Simons 
of Deventer, Netherlands, whose professional career as 
a translator spans 26 years and service with the United 
Nations, European community, and World Council of 
Churches, believes this ability is "a gift of the Lord." It 
also requires special education and "a little practice," 
she added. Simons studied languages and economics at 



the University of Leipzig and law at King's College, 
London. Like other interpreters at plenary sessions, Si- 
mons works in 30-minute shifts due to the strain of lis- 
tening to one language and simultaneously interpreting 
in another. 

Delegates requiring the translator service in plenary 
sessions may register for it in the office of the Local 
Committee near the North Lobby entrance to the con- 
vention center. Equipment includes a receiver and ear- 
phones. The receiver — a small, metal box that will fit in 
the palm — has two earphone outlets and a dial. The out- 
lets permit two listeners to use the same receiver at the 
same time. Listeners can dial their preferred language 
channel. 

Translators serving in the legislative committees are 
coordinated by Joyce Hill of the staff of the General 
Board of Global Ministries. This personal interpretive 
service may be requested in the committee sessions. 

Operator of the six-channel transmitter is Glenn 
Carlson of Asbury United Methodist Church, Indian- 
apolis. 

— Tom Potter 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



153 



Sayre Is Longest-Serving Clergy Delegate 



Meet the Rev. Dr. Charles Sayre, here for his eighth 
consecutive General Conference. Sayre heads the dele- 
gation from the Southern New Jersey Conference. He 
was surprised to be honored by his fu-st ballot election 
by his colleagues — since he retired two years ago. As 
former minister of the largest church in the conference, 
he believes people know where he stands: with a solid 
Wesleyan theology. 

His twenty-five years of service as senior minister of 
Haddonfield United Methodist Church, Haddonfield, 
New Jersey was the springboard for his current minis- 
try. While serving Haddonfield UMC, he started Re- 
spond, an outreach program connecting the suburban 
church with urban ministries. He is passionate about 
the church's work in the inner city and says there is no 
difference between the urban and subiu-ban church: 
they are both in ministry together. Sayre now networks 
with Respond, 250 mainline suburban, storefront, and 
Pentecostal churches and county agencies to provide 
ministries in Camden, New Jersey. 

Camden recently was named the poorest, most dev- 
astated city in the United States by Time magazine, 
Sayre said. Of its 90,000 residents, 23,000 families are 
on welfare. Sayre focuses on children ages five to thir- 
teen, whom he says "need safe houses, not crack 
houses." 

His three-pronged urban strategy provides a strong 
program for these young people and their families. 
That strategy includes 1) a house church, which centers 
around a Black, Christian grandmother who opens her 
heart and her home; 2) support groups — Sunday school 
classes, small groups, and so forth; and 3) one-on-one 
mentoring for boys and girls. Through these three, 
Sayre said that the Respond Center is recreating the 
New Testament church. 

When asked about special memories of past General 
Conferences, Sayre provided a brief history. He noted 
that the 1964 and 1968 conferences were involved in 
the merger. He recalled an Evangelical United Breth- 
ren bishop saying that the merger was like a big fish 
swallowing a minnow. 

Sayre was shocked to see the loss of one million 
members in the next ten years. 1972 was the re-struc- 
turing conference, when three "super boards" replaced 
several smaller boards. He believes this was a big mis- 




The Rev. Dr. Charles Sayre takes a break from his eighth 
consecutive General Conference. 

take because the boards became directing rather than 
serving agencies and that we still deal with the issue 
today. 

Sayre calls the period after 1976 the time of inclu- 
siveness. By inclusiveness, he means the inclusion of ra- 
cial/ethnic persons, women, and the global church. He 
pointed to the call in Wednesday morning's session for 
more headsets as an example of the church's growing 
inclusiveness. He thinks this is important. He sees par- 
allels between growth and mission and between in- 
grown concerns and membership loss, both in local 
churches and in the denomination. 

The Rev. Sayre encourages first-time delegates to do 
their homework for their legislative committee. He said 
that it's nearly impossible to read everything that 
comes before the General Conference. He says the real 
work is done in the legislative committees and urges 
delegates to be engaged with the issues. "The issues are 
vital and dynamic. ..marvelous." 

Married nearly fifty years, he also eiyoys gardening 
and reading mysteries when not working. 

— Patricia Ann Meyers 



Cokesbury's Autographing Booth 

Come by to greet and give support to these United Methodist authors! 
Check dally postings throughout the Cokesbury display and the Daily Chnstian Advocate for scheduled appearances. 

Signing! by: 

Grant S. Shockley • Anne Broyles • Art Guillermo • Tom Tozer • Maxie Dunnam • James Thomas • Homer Noley • Donald E. Messer 

J. Ellsworth Kalas • William Hinson • Kenneth Carder • George Hunter. Ill • Robert C Morgan • Earl G. Hunt. Jr. • James A. Harnish 

Charles Yngoyen • Bruce Hilton • Robert Spam • Zan Holmes • Eddie Fox • Kenneth Kinghorn • Mariorie Kimbrough 

Michael Ripski • James Moore 



154 



May 8, 1992 



Announcements 



The doors to Plenary Hall will be locked at 8:30 a.m. 
each morning during worship. This is done in 
deference to those persons who have arrived on time 
and to those who have prepared the worship. 
*** 

United Methodist television programming continues in 
area hotels for the duration of General Conference. 
The hour program, brought to you by UMCom, airs at 
7:00 am. and 9:00 p.m. each day except Simday and 
includes a General Conference update and a variety of 
UM programming, including "Catch the Spirit" and 
"Why We Care." This service is available on the 
following channels: Brown Hotel, Channel 8; Gait 
House/Gait House East, Channel 6; Holiday Inn 
Downtown, Channel 6; Hyatt Regency, Channel 4; 
Seelbach, Channel 14. 

*** 

Albany Area challenge checks will be accepted through 
Monday's plenary session. Deliver checks to BUI J. 
Barnqr, Sec. B-7-1 or Dorothy M. Earl, Sec B-3-L 

Positions avEulable this July: registrar/assistant to 
dean and director of development for annual fund with 
Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Contact 
Norman E. DeWire, president. Gait House, room 1035. 

MAYS 

Time change: Committee on References 
will meet in room 114 at 12:30 p.m. on 
Friday, May 8. 



^.0?. 



Food Service, Hall C, will be closed Friday, May 8. 
Food will be available in the lobby for those who 
cannot fast. 

*** 

"Jim Lawson Live," a call-in issues show broadcast 
every Friday night on the VISN Interfaith Satellite 
Network, will originate from the General Conference 
stage Friday, May 8 from 10:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. 
Friday's show will ask the question: "Is it possible to 
be pro-choice and pro-life?" This UMCom sponsored 
show can be seen Friday in Louisville on the Faith 
Channel (Storer Cable Channel 19). 
*** 

The Institute on Religion and Democracy will sponsor 
an issues forum on "New Mission and Ministry in the 
Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe," Friday, 
May 8, 12:45 p.m., Sampson Room, 1st floor. Gait 



House East. Speakers: Bishop Ruediger Minor and 
Mark Elliott. 

*** 

MARCHA will offer a banquet on Friday, May 8, 5:30 
p.m. at the Seelback Hotel, 500 Fourth Avenue. 
Donation $24. 

*** 

Meet Alex Awad, Palestinian-American missionary 
commissioned by GBGM to serve in Arab E^st 
Jerusalem. (Editor's note: two times reported:) Friday, 
May 8, 1:15 p.m and 12:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. ~ Quality 
Hotel (100 E. Jefferson), room 401. (Coffee, tea, juices, 
and broth provided); 5:00 p.m. - press conference, 
convention center, room 203 (event co-sponsored by 
UM Communications). 

*** 

Affirmation and the Reconciling Congregation 
Program will sponsor a worship service, which will 
include the commemoration of persons who have lived 
with AIDS, on Friday, May 8, 12:45 p.m., in the 
Regency South Room of the Hyatt Regency. 

MAYO 

The Montana Logging and Ballet Company will 
perform in a benefit concert for the Methodist 
Federation for Social Action on Saturday, May 9 at 
8:00 p.m. in the Macauley Theater. Tickets are $20, 
available in the lobby of the convention center. Also 
available from MFSA are stoles from Palestine, Ghana, 
and Guatemala 

MAY 10 

National Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc., 
dinner will be held Sunday, May 10, 4:00 p.m. at R.E. 
Jones United Methodist Church. Donation $10, 
contact Joseph Roberson or Betty Henderson for 
reservations and transportation. 
*** 

Worship service ~ "Discernment in Action," Sunday, 
May 10, 10:00 am.. Gait House, Archibald Room, 
hosted by the General Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women. 

*** 

Western Pennsylvania celebration limcheon: Sunday, 
May 10, 2:00 p.m. Masterson's Restavirant, 1830 S. 
Third Street (636-2511), carpool or group taxi, 
(approximately twelve blocks from convention center). 



< 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



155 



The Presbyterian Center, 100 Witherspoon Street, 
invites you to see and tour the National Offices of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), on Sunday, May 10 
from 4:00 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. and 6^0 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. 

MAY 11 

Bishop Emilio J.M. deCarvalho will appear on 
WAVE-TV Monday, May 11 at 6:00 am. on "Sunrise 
Today," local Channel 3. He will discuss Africa 
University and upcoming October elections in Angola. 

*** 

Minnesota folks and friends will gather Monday, May 
11 at 6:00 p.m. at the Gait House East. For 
reservations call L. Grage, Gait House - 1830. 

*** 

The National Association of Annual Conference Lay 
Leaders invites all present and former conference lay 
leaders to lunch on Monday, May 11 from 12:45 p.m. 
to 1:45 p.m. in the cafeteria behind Cokesbury. 
••• 

The New Jersey Area luncheon will be held Monday, 



May 11, at 12:45 p.m. in the Governor's Room of the 
Gait House East. 

••• 

Louisiana delegation and friends will have a breakfast 
May 11, 7:00 am. in the Gait House East, Governor's 
Room. Guests: Bishop and Mrs. Oden and bishops 
elected from Louisiana and their spouses. 
**• 

Northern Illinois Conference dinner will be held, 
Monday, May 11, 6:00 p.nx. Brown Hotel. Tickets may 
be purchased for $10.50 from Kay Dillard. 

MAY 12 

The Indiana Area is sponsoring a luncheon on 
Tuesday, May 12 in the Hyatt Regency, Park Room. 

MAY 13 

Albany Area dinner will be held Wednesday, May 13, 
5:45 p.m.. Days Inn, 101 Jefferson St., $15. 
Reservations needed by Friday, May 8, to Dorothy 
Earl, Sec B-3-1 or Bill Barney, Sec B-7-1. 
Entertciinment by Sister Spirit. 



Classic Christian Works 



C* V V V V V V 



^r— 7 

ESTTANLEY 

JONES 






so WE 

BELIEVE 

SO WE 

PRAY 



George .4. Buttrick 




♦> ♦> ♦> ♦:■• 





Christian Maturity, 6v £, Smn/cy Jones. In this guide to higlily effective living, 
one of the best selhng religious writers of all lime reveals the characteristics of a 
truly mature Christian character. Jones teaches that you "become mature when 
you related yourself to God. respond to His grace, and work it out in life," 
AOl-076625. Paper. $5.95 

So We Believe, So We Pray, h\ George A. Bullnck. This brilliant and penetrating 
illumination of our fundamental Chnstian beliefs and prayers reveals what it 
should really mean to be Christian in our daily thoughts and actions, Buttrick also 
clearly explains, phrase bv phrase, the deepest implications of The Lord's Prayer. 
AOl-390494. Paper, $5.95 

Conversion, by E. Stanley Jones. A world-famous author and missionary sheds 
light on the joy, peace, and satisfaction that come with conversion. E. Stanley 
Jones offers penetrating insights into what conversion is, how it comes about, and 
its lasting effects for the convert, 
AOl-083966, Paper. $5.95 



Mastery; The Art of Mastering Life, by E. Stanley Jones. Offers 365 
spirit-building devotions that show how to master your own life by humbly 
submitting to the Mastery of Jesus Christ. 
AOl-237343. Paper, $5.95 

The Divine Yes, by E. Stanley Jones. Written in the 14-month period between i 
cnppling stroke and his death. The Dnine Yes is E. Stanley Jones's spiritual 
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triumphant spiritual victory available t« all who say "YesI" to God and to life. 
AOl-109906. Paper, $4.95 



[m) Cokesbury 



Visit the Cokesbury Display 
at General Conference! 



OA.0275-2 



156 



May 8, 1992 



Legislative Committee Reports 



Church and Society 

The committee voted to concur with petitions that: 

* revise a resolution that reaffirms Peace with Jus- 
tice as a Special Program assigned to GBCS and funded 
by the Peace with Justice offering; 

* take a stand against gun violence by expanding 
education programs, communicating with the Congress 
and President, and developing model legislation on ef- 
fective gim control; 

* work for available and affordable housing by local 
churches enlisting volunteers, funding projects, pooling 
resources, urging community organization/advocacy, 
and undertaking the building and renovating of houses; 

* decry homelessness as a "scourge upon the nation's 
conscience" and recommend actions for change by all 
levels of the church; 

* highlight new developments in genetic science; ex- 
amine medical, agricultural, and environmental impli- 
cations; and call for broad church actions on genetics. 

— Suzanne Calvin, Lee Ranch (May 7, 12:30 p.m.) 



Conferences 

The committee concurred with petitions that: 

* would permit reserve clergy and lay delegates to 
jurisdictional and Central conferences to serve as re- 
serve delegates to General Conference; 

* wovdd include all clergy members in the election of 
delegates to General Conference including associate 
members, probationary members, and local pastors. 

— Dan Gangler, Jane Dennis (May 7, 2:30 p. m.) 



Faith and Mission 

The committee concurred with report of the Commit- 
tee to Study Homosexuality as amended. Vote: yes 89, 
no 0, abstention 0. 

The amendments include: 

* adding annotated bibliography to study; 

* developing study resources "consistent with the So- 
cial Principles of the UMC which support ministry to 
homosexual persons by individuals, groups, local 
churches, annual conferences, and the general church; 

* requesting the UMPH to develop resources in con- 
sultation with advisory committee appointed by the 
Council of Bishops and funded by UMPH; "If a practic- 
ing homosexual is named to the committee, the commit- 
tee shall also include a person who has abandoned that 
lifestyle."; 

* retaining present language of par. 7 IF; 

* adding par. 71G supporting human rights and civil 
liberties for homosexual persons, but deleting words "in 
same sex relationships." 



There will be a minority report on language of 71F. 
— Lynne DeMichele, Ann Whiting (May 7, 5:30 p.m.) 

Financial Administration 

The conunittee called for adoption of a 1993-96 gen- 
eral church budget of $448,928,000. The action would 
put a cap on general chxu-ch apportionments for the 
quandrennium, limiting them to no more than four 
times the amount apportioned to the annual confer- 
ences for 1992. Any new programs approved by General 
Conference would have to be contained within the cap. 
The vote was 68-17 with one abstention. 

The committee rejected 61-24, with one abstention, a 
motion to accept the General Council on Finance and 
Administration budget figure of $495,652,000 as a cap. 

The committee asked the GCFA to prepare, for com- 
mittee use, a budget based on the coromittee's recom- 
mended figure. 

The committee also concvured with petitions that: 
* would allow annual conferences to elect either a 
treasurer or a treasurer/director of administrative serv- 
ices, who would be present at cabinet meetings when 
administrative matters were considered; 

* permit the director of the conference or area UM 
Foundation to have voice without vote on the Confer- 
ence Council on Ministries; 

* bar CCFA members from voting on matters in 
which they have a conflict of interest; 

* make inclusiveness a consideration in the selection 
of CCFA officers and the audit review committee; 

* give the CCFA responsibility for helping local 
churches to make facilities and programs accessible to 
the disabled. 

* add "a housing allowance in lieu of parsonage" to 
pastors' expenses that must be reported in the annual 
conference journal. 

The committee voted nonconcurrence on 35 petitions 
(including at least a dozen relating to standardizing 
pastoral salary schedules). 

— Jean Caffey Lyles, Willie Teague (May 7, 6:00p.m.) 



General and Judicial Administration 



The committee concurred with: 

* a report from the General Conference explaining 
the progress of 3 programs: Rural Crisis; Focus on Chil- 
dren, Youth, and Families; and Peace with Justice; 

* the definition that a special program is a quadren- 
nial emphasis approved by the General Conference and 
assigned to a general program agency; 

* an amended recommendation to add a budget in 
the establishing of study committees, commissions, and 
task groups; 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



157 



* the observance of Golden Cross Sunday on a date 
set by each annual conference rather than the General 
Conference; 

* the preference that Laity Sunday be observed on 
the third Sunday in October; 

* a proposed budget for the National Committee on 
Deaf Ministries of $104,500 for the 1993-96 quadren- 
nium; 

* the GCOM and GCFA that all general agency 
headquarters be retained in their present locations 
through the next quadrennium. 

— Linda Green (May 7, 4:45 p. m.) 



Global Ministries 

The committee conciured with the following peti- 
tions with amendments: 

* calling the General Board of Global Ministries' Na- 
tional Division to establish a study committee for 
Asian-American Language Ministries; 

* allowing each annual conference to set up a Com- 
mission on the Small Membership Church. 

The committee voted nonconcurrence with petitions: 

* regarding composition and election of directors of 
Women's Division and the use of its undesignated 
funds; 

* requesting funds for a Study of Rural Community 
with a suggested budget of $100,000. 

— Linda Bloom (May 7, 2:40p.m.) 



Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

The committee concurred with petitions: 
■* affirming rural chaplaincy as a specialized ministry 
for both laity and clergy. (A minority report was sub- 
mitted, which concurs with the petition but that re- 
places all references to "rural chaplains" or "rural 
chaplaincy" with "persons working in rural ministries" 
and deletes all references to certification.);* editing, for 
clarity and consistency, various parts of par. 732 re- 
garding responsibilities of an annual conference Board 
of Higher Education and Campus Ministry;* amending 
par. 1511 to clarify the role of the Division of Chaplains 
and Related Ministries regarding chaplain endorsement 
authority, the establishment of standards for such en- 
dorsement,, and the advocacy and encouragement of 
those serving under the World Division of the General 
Board of Global Ministries;* clarifying that United 
Methodist schools of theology are established and main- 
tained for the education of diaconal ministers as well as 
ordained ministers;* calling for the adoption of the con- 
tinuing resolution for $20 million in apportioned funds 
and special gifts in support of the Afi-ica University;* 
changing the name of The National Methodist Founda- 
tion for Christian Higher Education to The United 
Methodist Foundation for Christian Higher Education;* 
defining the University Senate as an elected body of 



higher education officials created by General Confer- 
ence to determine which schools can be listed as affili- 
ated with The United Methodist Church;* describing 
the purpose of the University Senate as that of estab- 
lishing the criteria required of schools, colleges, univer- 
sities, and theological schools to be listed as United 
Methodist-affiliated institutions; and assvu-ing through 
an effective review process that such schools have insti- 
tutional integrity, well-structured programs, sound 
management, and clearly defined church relation- 
ships;* directing the GBHEM and the Division of 
Higher Education to see that at least 10% of the $100 
million scholarship Endowment Fund be allotted to 
United Methodist students at non-United Methodist 
schools (provided sufficient unrestricted funds are avail- 
able); amending the original petition to include require- 
ments that local church pastors certify that applicants 
have been active members of The United Methodist 
Church for at least one year and that funds be allotted 
only to full-time undergraduate students of accredited 
institutions;* supporting the development of campus 
ministry programs by: 1) focusing campus ministry as a 
mission of the church; 2) strengthening ethnic minority 
programs; 3) fostering a recognition of the world as our 
parish in campus ministries; 4) supporting the role of 
campus ministry in ministerial enlistment and lay 
leadership development;* urging adoption of "Campus 
Ministry: Mission at the Center" as a Special Program 
for the 1993-96 quadrennium, funded at $1 million and 
assigned to the GBHEM for implementation;* adding 
an assistant general secretary for the Black College 
Fund to the Division of Higher Education. — Al Horton, 
Karen Tisinger (May 7, 5:00 p.m.) 



Independent Commissions 

The committee concurred with petitions: 

* adding jurisdictional networks of communicators 
and making UMCOM the publisher of the official Pro- 
gram Calendar of the denomination; 

* endorsing commimications access for persons with 
hearing and sight impairments; 

* supporting VISN - Vision Interfaith Satellite Net- 
work; 

* allowing for the addition of sexual harassment 
policies and procedvu-es to the priorities of the Confer- 
ence Commission on the Status and Role of Women; 

* granting change in the make-up of additional at- 
large membership on the Conference COSROW; 

* enhancing the membership of the Conference Com- 
mittee on Religion and Race; 

* redefining the purpose of the Commission on Ar- 
chives and History; 

* reconfiguring the membership of the Commission 
on Archives and History, plus amending to include Cen- 
tral Conference representatives; 

* reorganizing the paragraphs related to historic so- 
cieties; 

* developing definition and description of historic 
sites, historic shrines, and historic landmarks; 



158 



May 8, 1992 



* darifying the responsibilities of the General Com- 
mission on Religion and Race with regard to constituen- 
cies served by annual conferences and local churches; 

* reaffirming United Methodist membership in the 
National Council of Churches; 

* reaffirming United Methodist membership in the 
World Council of Churches (WCC). 

The committee voted non-concurrence on: 

* adding a permissive "may" to the creation of the 
annual conference COSROW; 

* changing the responsibilities of the conference 
COSROW; 

* providing "Catch the Spirit" during "prime time" 
in all areas of the U.S.; 

* redirecting funds from "Catch the Spirit" to a na- 
tional radio and T.V. ad campaign; 

* changing from "shall" to "may" relative to annual 
conferences creating a Conference Commission on 
Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. 



— James H. Steele, Kristin Knudson (May 7, 5:15 p. m.) 



Local Church 

The committee concurred with petitions to: 

* include the chairperson of the Council on Minis- 
tries in the council's basic membership and to include a 
coordinator of scouting ministry as an optional member; 

* add providing "interpreters" to the list of duties of 
the coordinator of communications; 

* require that, when a merger is proposed, the local 
church conference of each church in a multi-church 
charge approve the merger; 

* require district superintendent to secure legal 
counsel concerning reversion clauses or other restric- 
tions before approving the sale of abandoned property; 

* require local church trustees to act as socially re- 
sponsible investors; 

* require relocating local churches to offer their 
property to a United Methodist congregation or agency 
at a price not to exceed fair market value. 

The committee concurred with amendments with pe- 
titions to: 

* list a "Chairperson of Community Volunteers" as 
an optional member of the Council on Ministries and to 
include a job description for the chairperson; 

* list a new description of the duties of the chairper- 
son of the worship work area; 

* add the word "interpreters" to the list of services 
the coordinator of communications provides and to add 
production of video resources for ministry and outreach 
to the duties of the coordinator; 

* delete language specifying the Administrative 
Board of Council as the administration organization of 
the church; 

* specify the local church trustees annually review 
property, liability, malpractice, and crime insurance 
coverage; 



* state a chiu*ch leaving a church that joined the cir- 
cuit after the parsonage is acquired has no claim on the 
value of the parsonage; 

* encourage a formal covenantal relationship for 
congregations and groups with shared facilities and de- 
velopment of mutual ministries; 

* require plans for new church buildings and parson- 
ages conform to accessibility codes and be reasonably 
accessible. 

— Kathy Kruger Noble, Rayford Woodrick CMay 7, 
5:00 p.m.) 



Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

The committee took the following action on Wed. 
evening (May 6): 

* voted non-concurrence with the resolution from the 
Council of Bishops, which called for a continued study 
during the next quadrennium, regarding the report of 
the Commission for the Study of Ministry; 

* voted to receive the report of the Commisssion for 
the Study of Ministry, commend the commission for its 
work, and use the study as a background to guide the 
committee's decisons on petitions assigned for its con- 
sideration; 

* voted to send all petitions, including those from 
the commission, to six sub-committees; 

* confirmed the appointment of the sub-committee 
chairs — BUI Crouch, Linda Marshall, Jerome DelPino, 
Joy Carr, Ted Walter, and Doris Rudy. 

—Judy Smith (May 7, 11:30 a.m.) 




Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



159 



Judicial Decisions 

(Received 05-07-92) 



DECISION NO. 671 

IN RE: Whether 1988 General Conference Resolu- 
tion Entitled "Pay Equity in the USA" Applies to All 
General Agencies. 

DIGEST: 

The 1988 General Conference Resolution entitled 
"Pay Equity in the USA" applies to all General Agen- 
cies including the General Board of Pensions and the 
General Board of Publication. 

STATEMENT OF FACTS: 

At the 1991 Annual Meeting of the General Council 
on Finance and Administration, its committee on Audit 
and Review was directed to seek clarification from the 
Judicial Council on the intent of the General Confer- 
ence with regard to the 1988 General Conference Reso- 
lution entitled "Pay Equity in the USA." 

The Council on Finance and Administration has at- 
tempted to carry out its responsibilities by requesting 
information from all the agencies of the church. The 
General Board of Pensions and the General Board of 
Publication have refused to supply the requested infor- 
mation on the grounds that they are not specifically in- 
cluded in the resolution. 

At a hearing on May 6, 1992, in Loviisville, Ken- 
tucky, oral presentations were made by Craig Hoskins, 
representing the General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration, and James M. Walton-Myers, repre- 
senting the General Board of Pensions and the General 
Board of Publication. 

Jurisdictioii: 

The Judicial Council has jurisdiction under Para- 
graph 2615 of the 1988 Discipline. 

Analysis: 

The resolution in question, "Pay Equity in the 
USA", states; 

1. We call upon the General Council on Finance and 
Administration to evaluate internal wage structures 
and practices of general agencies in light of the princi- 
ple of pay equity and to include this assessment in its 
regular monitoring of equal employment opportunity 
compliance [The Book of Discipline, Paragraph 
907.7(b).]. 

The General Board of Pensions and General Board of 
Publication have joined in a brief in which they argue 
that they are not included in those required to comply 
with the resolution because of the reference to Para- 
graph 907.7(b). Both agencies state that they are in 
compliance with the resolution's aims but do not have 
to report to the General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration because they are not included in Para- 
graph 907.7(b). 



We find that Paragraph 907.7(b) is a process para- 
graph and do not determine it as limiting the duty of 
GCFA to monitor all general agencies. The parentheti- 
cal reference is an explanatory comment by definition 
and is not a part of the legislation. (See 1988 Book of 
Resolutions, p. 361, entitled "Pay Equity in the USA.") 

Had it so desired, the General Conference could eas- 
ily have excluded the two agencies which are asking to 
be excepted. It would have taken only a reference to 
general agencies receiving general church fxmds or to 
the agencies by name. Neither of these occurred in the 
original resolution nor the minor changes made in the 
final presentation. 

Decision: 

The 1988 General Conference Resolution entitled 
"Pay Equity in the USA" applies to all (Jeneral Agen- 
cies including the General Board of Pensions and the 
General Board of Publication. 

May 7, 1992 

Tom Matheny, President 

Wayne Coffin, Secretary 

671-2 



DECISION NO. 672 

IN RE: Interpretation of FVovision in the 1988 Disci- 
pline Paragraph 710.3(c) that "[t]he Term Conference 
Benevolences Shall Not Include Allocations and Expen- 
ditiu-es for Other Conference Agencies and Officers 
Whose Work Is Primarily Administrative." 

DIGEST: 

An Annual Conference may provide for the salary of 
the president of the conference United Methodist Foun- 
dation from conference benevolences so long as the 
work of the president is not primarily- administrative, 
but includes other duties such as stewardship, promo- 
tion, and development. 

STATEMENT OF FACTS: 

By action of the 1991 session of the Virginia Annual 
Conference, the funding for the office of the president of 
the United Methodist Foundation was included in the 
Conference Benevolences Budget. Par. 710.3(c) of the 
1988 Discipline states: "...conference benevolences shall 
not include those conference allocations and expendi- 
tures for other conference agencies and officers whose 
work is primarily administrative." An episcopal deci- 
sion was made by Bishop Thomas B. Stockton on the 
question of whether this allocation was legal. The 
Bishop answered in the affirmative, stating: 



160 



May 8, 1992 



"The President of the Foundation is a staff member 
of the Conference Council on Ministries with duties in 
the office of Ordained and Diaconal Ministries as well 
as the executive of the Foundation. The purpose of the 
Foundation is to solicit, receive, and administer funds 
for the ministry of the church. The past President of the 
Foundation has been involved in various stewardship 
training sessions, as well as assisting local churches in 
stewardship emphases. The new President and consult- 
ants, will expand this ministry. Therefore, it is my opin- 
ion that the President of the Virginia Conference 
Foundation is engaged in ministry beyond merely ad- 
ministrative and that the budget of the Virginia Con- 
ference is in harmony with Paragraph 710.3(c) of The 
Discipline." 

In his opinion, the bishop stated, the allocation of 
conference benevolences to pay the salary of the presi- 
dent of the Virginia Conference Foundation did not vio- 
late the Discipline. We did not, however, at ovir October 

1991 session have any information as to the actual job 
description of the president of the Foundation or the al- 
locations of the president's time. 

Thus, we reserved our decision of the review of the 
bishop's ruling and retained jurisdiction until our May 

1992 meeting. This was to allow us to receive further 
information as to the actual work of the president of the 
Foundation and to determine whether, in the words of 
the Discipline Paragraph 710.3(c), the work of the presi- 
dent "....is primarily administrative." 

Jurisdiction: 

The Judicial Council has jurisdiction under Para- 
graph 2612 of the 1988 Discipline. 

Analj'sis: 

Since our October 1991 meeting we have received 
considerable information relative to the duties of the 
president of the Foundation. In by-laws adopted June 
26, 1990, the job description of the president was 
spelled out in some detail. Contained in the job descrip- 



tion are the duties which require the president to pro- 
mote stewardship throughout the Annuad Conference; 
to engage in marketing, public relations and promo- 
tions on behalf of the Foundation; and to assist in the 
management of Foundation assets. 

It is apparent the work of the president of the Foun- 
dation is not "primarily administrative." Thus, the 
bishop is correct in his ruling; the support of the presi- 
dent of the United Methodist Foundation is properly in- 
cluded in conference benevolences; and there is no 
violation of 1988 Discipline Paragraph 710.3(c). 

We feel compelled to observe, however, that while 
the method chosen by the Virginia Conference to fiind 
the president of the Foundation is not a technical viola- 
tion of the 1988 Discipline, we question the use of con- 
ference benevolences for this purpose. Great care needs 
to be used by Annual Conferences Ln designating alloca- 
tions and expenditures as conference benevolences. It 
may well be that another soiu-ce of conference funding 
would be more appropriate for the chief executive offi- 
cer of a United Methodist Foundation. 

Great care also needs to be used Ln the language of 
foundation charters; e.g., the Virginia Foundation 
might wish to review the language of its charter to 
make certain it is broad enough to authorize the job de- 
scription of the president. 

Decision: 

An Ann ual Conference may provide for the salary of 
the president of the conference United Methodist Foun- 
dation from conference benevolences so long as the 
work of the president is not primarily administrative, 
but includes other duties such as stewardship, promo- 
tion, and development. 

May 7, 1992 

Tom Matheny, President 

Wayne Coffin, Secretary 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



161 



Petitions Referred 



FROM PET. # PARA.# 



TO PET.# PARA. # 



FROM PET. # PARA.# 



TO PET.# PARA. # 



CO 


10360 


3000M 


FA 


10360 


3000M 


IC 


11662 


1904D 


GJ 


11662 


1904D 


CO 


10361 


3000M$ 




INVALID 


IC 


11663 


1907D 


GJ 


11663 


1907D 


CO 


11640 


061 ID 


GJ 


11640 


061 ID 


IC 


11664 


1908D 


GJ 


11664 


1908D 


CO 


11641 


0705D 


GJ 


11641 


0705D 


IC 


11665 


2003D 


GJ 


11665 


2003D 


cs 


10282 


3000R 


CS 


10282 


0074D 


IC 


11666 


2004D 


GJ 


11666 


2004D 


cs 


10285 


3000R 


FM 


10285 


3000R 


IC 


11667 


2208D 


GJ 


11667 


2208D 


cs 


10967 


3000R$ 


IC 


10967 


3000R 


IC 


11754 


0653D 


CO 


11754 


0653D 


cs 


11063 


3000M$ 


GM 


11063 


3000R 


MN 


10956 


0448D 


GJ 


10956 


0448D 


cs 


11064 


3000R 




DELETE 


MN 


11668 


0527.4D 


GJ 


11668 


0527.4D 


cs 


12209 


3000R 


FM 


12209 


3000R$ 


MN 


11975 


1505DI 


HE 


11975 


1505D 


cs 


12421 


3000M 




INVALID 


LC 


11704 


3000R 




INVALID 


cs 


12411 


007 ID 




INVALID 


LC 


12436 


3000R 




INVALID 


DI 


10695 


0000D$ 


GJ 


10695 


0000D$ 














DI 


10761 


OOOOD 


GJ 


10761 


OOOOD 














DI 


10818 


OOOOD 


GJ 


10818 


OOOOD 














DI 


11299 


0000D$ 


GJ 


11299 


0000D$ 














DI 


11467 


3000M 




DELETE 














DI 


11468 


3000M$ 


GJ 


11468 


3000M$ 














DI 


11642 


0632D 


GJ 


11642 


0632D 














DI 


11643 


1307D 


GJ 


11643 


1307D 














DI 


11910 


3000D 


GJ 


11910 


3000R 














FA 


10970 


3000M$ 




INVALID 














FA 


11644 


0904D 


GJ 


11644 


0904D 














FA 


11645 


0905D 


GJ 


11645 


0905D 














FA 


11646 


0906D 


GJ 


11646 


0906D 














FA 


11647 


0907D 


GJ 


11647 


0906D 














FA 


11648 


091 ID 


GJ 


11648 


091 ID 














FA 


11649 


0912D 


GJ 


11649 


0912D 














FA 


11650 


09130D 


GJ 


11650 


0913D 














FA 


12318 


3000R$ 


FA 


12318 


3000R 














FM 


10312 


3000R 


FM 


10312 


OOOOD 














FM 


10341 


3000R$ 




INVALID 














FM 


10597 


3000R 


FM 


10597 


0072D 














FM 


11379 


3000M 




INVALID 














FM 


11380 


3000M 




INVALID 














FM 


11434 


0068D 




INVALID 














FM 


11436 


3000R 




INVALID 














FM 


11437 


3000D 




INVALID 














FM 


11519 


0066D 




INVALID 














FM 


11962 


0068D 




INVALID 














FM 


12217 


0068D 




INVALID 














FM 


12347 


3000R 


FM 


12347 


3000R$ 












• 


FM 


12373 


3000R 


FM 


12373 


007 ID 














FM 


12387 


3000R 


FM 


12387 


0906D 














GJ 


10867 


3000A$ 


GM 


10867 


3000A$ 














GJ 


11163 


3000R 


FM 


11163 


3000R 














GJ 


11848 


3000R 




INVALID 














GM 


12150 


3000R 


FA 


12150 


3000R 














GM 


12151 


3000R 


IC 


12151 


3000R 














GM 


12152 


3000R 


IC 


12152 


3000R 














GM 


12153 


3000R 


IC 


121.')3 


3000R 














HE 


11279 


0516D 


HE 


11279 


1516D 














HE 


11661 


1503D 


GJ 


11661 


1503D 














HE 


12436 


3000R 


LC 


12436 


3000R 















162 



May 8, 1992 



New or Corrected Petitions 



1151 4 MN-12448-514-D; The Council of Bishops (new) 

Specific Responsiblities of Bishops 

Add a new 514.3 

3. To teach the Holy Scriptiires; to teach and 
uphold the Doctrinal Standards of The United 
Methodist Church; and to lead the chiirch in its 
teaching ministry. 



4. Responsiveness to the radically changed and 
changing world culture in which we are called to do 
ministry in Christ's name. 

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the General 
Conference authorize the Coxmcil of Bishops, in 
cooperation with the General Council on Ministries, the 
General Council on Finance and Administration, and the 
Commission on Central Conference Affairs, to continue 
to develop this proposal on the Global Nature of The 
United Methodist Church and to report to the General 
Conference, 1996. 



(Petition Number: CJ 11007-3000R; Council ofBishops) 
(corrects copy found on Page 667) 

The Global Nature 
of The United Methodist Church 



WHEREAS there must be developed a truly global church 
which has an integrity which affords dignity for all parts 
of The United Methodist Church. Our church must be an 
expression of the global nature of our church 
membership. "A member of a local United Methodist 
church is a member of the total United Methodist 
connection." (par. 210); and 

WHEREAS there must be equity (parity) between what 
are now called Central Conferences and Jurisdictional 
Conferences; and 

WHEREAS we must provide for connectional unity with 
the flexibility and freedom for meeting regional needs; and 
WHEREAS we must redefine some General Conference 
responsibilities as regional ones. Much of the current 
General Conference agenda is focused exclusively on . 
United States issues and needs. At least some of this 
agenda could be handled in a North American Regional 
Conference just as similar regional agenda could be 
addressed in other Regional Conferences; and 
WHEREAS we must be sensitive to how God seeks to 
manifest the Gospel in each unique culture and nation. 
We must also maintain a vital global connection in order 
to prevent both narrow parochialism and detrimental 
regionalism; and 

WHEREAS our global vision for The United Methodist 
Church includes, but is not limited to, the following: 

1. Provision of a means by which the United Methodist 
family can live and serve together in a common dignity 
and respect as we together respond to the mission of 
Jesus Christ. 

2. A serious responsiveness to the unique needs and 
expressions of faith in each of the regions of the world 
and provision for freedom for creative response to unique 
characteristics. 

3. Connection of our global United Methodist 
membership at essential points and through conunon 
global mission. 



IC-124S2-3000-R; Council ofBishops (New) 

Act of Covenant Between the United 
Methodist Churchand other churches. 

Bishop Forest C. Stith, Chairperson 
Affiliated Autonomous Committee, Council ofBishops 
PREAMBLE 

Covenants have been an integral part in the history of 
God's relationships with the People of God. Indeed, as the 
General Conference of 1968 stated ("On the Ecumenical 
Road", A Statement on the Cause of Christian 
Unity):".. .the profoundest imperative to Christian unity 
springs from God's own design and providence for his 
covenant People." In the Preamble to the Constitution of 
The United Methodist Church we are alerted to the 
dangers of all dividedness: 'The Church of Jesus Christ 
exists in and for the World, and its very dividedness is a 
hindrance to its mission in that World." In recent decades 
we have received clearer understanding of the 
relationship between Christian unity and our covenant 
with God. At the same time we have new insight into the 
nature of the Christian Church and a new sense of 
common global mission. Geographical and political 
boundaries do not limit the Body of Christ. 
The United Methodist Church has a stake in the faithful 
discipleship of other communions. Other communions 
have a stake in the faithful discipleship of The United 
Methodist Church. Thus, The United Methodist Church 
now seeks a new form of acceptance of God's gift of unity. 
We seek to engage in covenant with other Christian 
churches wherever more visible Christian unity can 
increase effective mission in the modern world. This 
covenant is a symbol of the search for deeper 
relationships with churches that are a part of the whole 
Covenant People of God. 

In this Act of Covenanting, the emphasis is on our roots 
in the Apostolic Faith and in our contemporary 
experience of God's love and will. It is aimed at 
encouraging a new sense of global common cause, mutual 
support, mutual spiritual growth, common study of 
scripture and culture, creative interaction as ministers in 
the mission of God's Church, cross-fertilization of ideas 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



163 



about ways to be in that mission, sharing the resources, 

and exploring new forms of service directed at old and 

emerging needs. 

In this Covenant, the 2 and he United Methodist Church 

acknowledge The centrality of the Sovereignty of Jesus 

Christ, as basic to all relationships. Our links with the 

Apostolic Faith through Scripture, Tradition, Experience, 

and Reason lead us now solemnly to affirm to each other 

that "all who are baptized into Christ are members of 

Christ's ministry through the people of the one God, 

Father, Son and Holy Spirit." (Commission on Christian 

Unity Digest, 1974, p. 335; Official Record, XII, 1974) 

WHEREAS the 1988 General Conference adopted an Act 

of Covenant document to be offered to communion 

churches around the world, 

and WHEREAS the following churches have signed this 

document, after consultation with the Council of Bishops 

The Methodist Church in the Republic of China 

The Methodist Church of Indonesia, Gereja Methodist 

Indonesia 

The Basel Christian Church of Malaysia 

Iglesia Evangelica National Methodista Primtiva De 

Guatemala 

Puerto Rico Iglesia Metodista Unida 

Methodist Church Nigeria 

The Methodist Church-Kenya 

The Methodist Church-Ghana 

The General Conference of 1992 agrees to join with these 

churches in the Act of Covenant as found in the Book of 

Discipline (para. #650) and Book of Resolutions. 

Bishop Forrest C. Stith 

Chairperson 

Affiliated Autonomous Committee CouncU of Bishops 

COVENANT: 

(a) We, therefore, recognize our respective baptisms as 
different facets of the one baptism and mutually 
recognize the members of the F3 and of the United 
Methodist Church are members one of the other; 

(b) We, therefore, recognize each other as authentic 
expressions of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic 
Church of Jesus Christ. 

(c) We, therefore, recognize the ordained ministries of our 
churches and pledge our mutual efforts at effecting forms 
of reconciliation of those ministries, including the 
exchange or transfer of ordained ministers between 
properly constituted bodies where the approval and 
consent of the appropriate authorities involved is given. 
The assumption of pastoral care of members visiting or 
residing in each other's countries is another instance of 
this aspect of the Act of Covenanting. 

(d) We are committed to a systematic participation in full 
Eucharistic fellowship as a symbol of transcendence over 
manifestations of human divisions. 

(e) We expect that the various agencies of our two 
churches will function in new ways of partnership in 
mission and evangelism, in education and 
implementation of the Gospel. Mutual sharing of 
principles and methods can improve our functioning in 
our separate contexts and especially in continuance or 



new development of joint projects in mission between the 
F4 and The United Methodist Church. 

(f) We expect that an expanded and focused international 
linkage of visitations and partnerships will take place. 
The bishops or presidents of the churches will arrange for 
mutually agreeable visitations and exchanges that will 
provide contact with and some knowledge of the social, 
political, economic, moral, and religious context in which 
the people of the world struggle for existence, meaning, 
and purpose. Mutual visitations may include occasional 
presence at each other's appropriate assemblies. . 

(g) Extended partnerships might be possible between, for 
example, a covenanting church or its parts and a 
particular congregation. Annual Conference or Episcopal 
Area of The United Methodist Church. Such participation 
in this covenant would be by special action subsequent to 
adoption of the Covenant. Such an extended partnership, 
perhaps in consultation with specific United Methodist 
agencies as well, might be for a defined period to enable a 
mutual flow of persons, interest, and commitment. The 
partnership can be extended or ended by mutual 
agreement. Such extended partnerships would make 
palpable the global stake we have in each other in various 
parts of the world. These focused partnerships would be 
integrated with visitations by leaders, and the sharing by 
agencies of time, ability, and funding resources. 

(h) Our covenant assumes the continuing independence 
and autonomy of the covenanting churches in their 
structures, traditions, styles of implementation of 
ministry, existing partnerships, agreements and 
explorations, forms of worship, and program. But we look 
forward to knowing each other in love, to losing our fear 
of difference and our fear of differences for the same, of 
more effective participation in the mission of God's 
Church. We make bold to anticipate that out of our 
experience we will be led by the Spirit to new forms of 
covenant and to new relationships for the global 
Christian community. 

(i) A brief liturgical celebration of the Act of Covenant 
shall be prepared by representatives of the two Churches 
and shall be celebrated at the chief legislative bodies of 
both covenanting Churches. 
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the 
undersigned do hereby covenant and agree to the ACT 
OF COVENANT as heretofore set forth, and hereunto set 
their hands and seals for and on behalf of their respective 
Churches the day and year of our Lord set after their 



The United Methodist Church 
By: 



(Names Printed) Date: 

Secretary, General Conference 



(Name Printed) 



Date 



164 



May 8, 1992 



Central Conferences 



Committee Items 




Calendar Items 



Voted by GC 



Unassigned 



Conferences 



Church and Society 



Committee Items 
107' 




Calendar Items 
15 
Voted by GC 



Unassigned 

114 Committee Items 




Unassigned 
126 
'oted by GC 



Calendar Items 



Discipleship Financial Administration 

Committee Items Committee Items ,_^ 

^^^^^^^^ Calendar Items 
VO Voted by 60 




Calendar Items 




Faith and Mission 

Committee Items 



Voted by GC 133 

Unassigned 




Voted by GC 



\l Calendar Items 



Unassigned .c7 



General/Judicial Administration 



Global Ministries 



Committee Items 
^^^^^^^k /20 Calendar lt€ 

( ^^V'° 

I J Voted by GC 

Unassigned X^^ y^ 

23?~ ^ C 



Higher Education and Chaplaincy 



Unassigned 

^ ^"^^^ 

Items ^^ \ ;0 Voted by GC 

^^^^^^^^^^^1 Calendar 

Committee Items ^^^^^^^ 



Calendar Items 
25 

Unassigned 



^— <- 25 

GC ^^k \ ,t Unassigned 

^^^B^^^p Voted by GC 
Committee Items^^^^^^^^^ 



Independent Commissions 



Unassigned >- ~-^ Calendar Items 

L /r 

^^^I^H^^O Voted by GC 
Committee Items^^^^ 



Local Church 

Committee Items 1121 



Ordained and DIaconal Ministry 



Unassigned 




Calendar Items 



yo Voted by GC 



Committee Items 

^ :206 

/^^^^^^^ /O by 

i ^^^^^° 

I j Calendar Hems 

Unassigned ^ -"""^ 



These charts picture the work done by each legislative committee. No petitions have been voted on by the Gen- 
eral Conference plenary. "Calendar Items" indicates the number of petitions voted on and released by the commit- 
tee. "Committee Items" records the nimaber of petitions being worked on somewhere in the committee. 
"Unassigned" shows the number of petitions that the committee has not yet addressed. 




Cokesbury 

Books •*■ Bibles + Church Supplies 



INVITES YOU TO MEET: 
Eddie Fox 

Author of: 

Let The Redeemed of the Lord Say So! 

and 

Faith Sharing 

Autographing books 

Friday, May 8 

11:00-11:30 

Kenneth C. Kinghom 

Author of: 

Gospel of Grace 

Co-Author of: 

United Methodism In America 

Autographing books 

Friday, May 8 

11:00 • 11:30 




*< .•** 



George Hunter 

Author of: 

How to Reach Secular People 

and 

To Spread the Power 

Autographing books 
Friday, May 8 
11:00-11:30 



All signings held in the 
Cokesbury Display 



^♦*h «^o, 




f'ts^ny 



166 



May 8, 1992 



Calendar Items 



Consent Calendar No. 1 
Rule 27.3-4 

Advance DCA, page 98 

1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 6, 7, 8, 9. 10, 11, 14, 15, 
16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 
28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 35, 37, 41, 42, 
43, 44, 46, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 
53, 55, 56, 57, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 
67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 
78, 79, 80, 86, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 
94, 95, 96. 

Calendar items printed with an • 
after the calendar number will auto- 
matically be placed on the Consent 
Calendar. If any five delegates wish 
to remove an item from the Consent 
Calendar for plenary consideration, 
the delegates shall complete the ap- 
proved form in Room 102 by 3 p.m. 
on the day the calendar item first 
appears in the DCA. Calendar items 
which contain a minority report will 
be indicated by the initials "MR" in 
parentheses. 



1 CCOOl 

Subject: The accredited 

representative of the Council of 

Bishops. 

Petition: CC-10996-0527-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 925 
Membership: 39; Present: 30; 
For 30; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/4 

Conunittee recommends concur- 
rence 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



£i CC002 

Subject: Central Conference 

Episcopal Appointment. 

Petition: CC-10096-0638-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 925 
Membership: 39; Present: 23; 
For 21; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/4 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurreiice ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



O CC003 

Subject: Central Conference 
Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women. 



Petition: CC-10540-2301-D 
Page in Advance DCA 925 
Membership: 39; Present: 24; 
For 19; Against: 2; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 5/4 

Conunittee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( K^ncurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



*± CC004 

Subject: Organize the Present 

Four Grerman Annual 

Conferences into one Central 

Conference. 

Petition: CC-10342-3000-R 

Page in Advance DCA: 926 

Membership: 39; Present: 24; 

For 24; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 

Date: 5/4 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as foUows: 

Amend Par.4, line 4: replace iet 
with led 

Amend Par.5, line 2: replace 1993 
with 1991 

Amend Par. 7, line 5: replace Ckir 
man with Germany 

( )ConctuTence ( )NonconcuiTence Date / 



D CC006 
Subject: Creation of a 
Shaba-Tanzania Annual 
Conference. 

Petition: CC-11057-30O0-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 927 
Membership: 39; Present: 24; 
For 24; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/4 

Committee recommends nonconmr- 
rence. 

Judicial Coimcil ruling in 1984 
determined that Central Conferences 
can determine the number of their An- 
nual Conferences. 

( )Coiicurrence { )NoDconcurrence Date / 



6 CC007 
Subject: Episcopal 
Administration in Central 
Conferences. 

Petition: CC-10995-0030-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 924 
Membership: 39; Present: 30; 
For 30; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/4 



Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Coiicurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



7* 



CC008 

Subject: Changing "Ministerial' 
to "Clergy". 

Petition: CC-11179-0027-C 
Page in Advance DCA 1019 
Membership: 39; Present: 29; 
For 25; Against: 4; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/4 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurreiice Date / 



8* 



CO012 

Subject: Changing the 'wording 
"Ministerial" to "Clergy". 

Petition: CO-11180-0012-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 1083 
Membership: 79; Present: 71; 
For: 67; Against: 3; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



9 CO013 

Subject: General Conference 

Membership. 

Petitions: CO-11504-0012-C, CO- 

12083-00 12-C. 

Pages in Advance DCA: 1083, 1019 . 

Membership: 79; Present: 73; 

For: 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 6; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



10* 



CO014 
Subject: Annual Conference. 

Petition: CO-11424-0010-C 
Page in Advance DCA 1083 
Membership: 79; Present: 73; 
For 63; Against: 0; Not Voting: 10; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrehce Date / 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



167 



11* CO016 

Subject: Update language of the 

Constitution. 

Petition: CO-11181-0014-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 1083 
Membership: 79; Present: 72; 
For: 69; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



12 



CO018 

Subject: Clergy Delegates to 
General Conference. 

Petition: CO-11281-0038-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 1086 
Membership: 79; Present: 71; 
For: 43; Against: 22; Not Voting: 6; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )NonconcuiTence Date / 



13 



CO019 
Subject: Lay delegates to 
General, Jurisdictional or 
Central Conferences. 

Petitions: CO-10015-0038-C, CO- 
10177-0038-C, CO-10961-0038-C, CO- 
11061-0038-C, CO-11187-0038-C. 
Pages in Advance DCA: 1086, 205, 
205, 1086, 1086. 
Membership: 79; Present: 71; 
For: 38; Against: 23; Not Voting: 10; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee reconunends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrenee Date / 



14* 



CO036 

Subject: Update the language of 
the Constitution. 

Petition: CO-11186-0037-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 1086 
Membership: 79; Present: 72; 
For 69; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Conunittee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

"Add to par. 37, Article m the fol- 
lowing sentence. These reserve clergy 
and lay delegates to the Jurisdiction or 
Central Conferences may act as 
reserve delegates to the General Conf." 

( )Concurrcnce ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



15 CO037 

Subject: Provision for Annual 

Conference reporting of 

delegates. 

Petitions: CO-11060-0037-C, CO- 

11670-0037-C. 

Pages in Advance DCA: 1085, 1086. 

Membership: 79; Present: 72; 

Fon 68; Against: 1; Not Voting: 3; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonooncurrenoe Date / 



16 CO041 

Subject: Annual Conference. 

Petition: CO-11669-0010-C 
Page in Advance DCA: 1083 
Membership: 79; Present: 73; 
For: 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 6; ' 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrenoe Date / 



17* 



FA044 
Subject: Basic Salary Plan. 

Petition: FA-10339-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 489 
Membership: 93; Present: 86; 
For: 79; Against: 5; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( X^ncurrence ( )Noncoiicuneiice Date / 



18 



FA061 
Subject: World Service 
Apportionments. 

Petition: FA-10055-0710-D 
Page m Advance DCA: 1 146 
Membership: 93; Present: 90; 
For: 66; Against: 22; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



19 FA053 
Subject: Budget of the 
Conference Council on Finance 
and Administration. 

Petition: FA- 1 1823-07 10-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1 146 
Membership: 93; Present: 90; 
For: 82; Against: 7; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 



Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrencc Date / 



20^ 



FA068 
Subject: Ministerial Support. 

Petitions: FA-10610-3000-R, FA- 

11077-3000-R, FA-12032-3000-R. 

Pages in Advance DCA: 488, 1164, 

1165. 

Membership: 93; Present: 86; 

For: 79; Against: 5; Not Voting: 2; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



21* GJOOl 
Subject: Report on 
Implementation of 1989-92 
Special Programs. 

Petition: GJ-10881-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 592 
Membership: 80; Present: 75; 
For 75; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



22' 



GJ002 

Subject: Defining a Special 
Program. 

Petition: GJ-10829-0803-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 652 
Membership: 80; Present: 78; 
For: 76; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



23 GJ0C3 

Subject: Report on the Process 

for Development for a 

Quadrennial Theme and Special 

Program. 

Petition: GJ-10880-3000-A 

Page in Advance DCA: 591 

Membership: 80; Present: 79; 

For: 75; Against: 1; Not Voting: 3; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



168 



May 8, 1992 



24* 



GJ004 
Subject: Report on the 
Information of the 1989-92 
Quadrennial Theme. 

Petition: GJ-10875-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 584 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConciuTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



25 



* 



GJ005 

Subject: Report on the Advance 
for Christ and His Church. 

Petition: GJ-10877-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 587 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



26* 



GJ006 

Subject: Policies Regarding 
Special Study Committees, Task 
Groups, Commissions, Etc., by 
General Conference. 
Petition: GJ-10869-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 569 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For: 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Amended to: Add budget to all 
proposals for studies. 

( )Caneurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



27* 



GJ007 
Subject: Church Founding Date. 

Petition: GJ-10836-0824-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 658 
Membership: 80; Present: 78; 
For: 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Noiiconcurrence Date / 



28* GJ008 

Subject: Church Funding Dates. 

Petition: GJ-10209-0824-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 658 
Membership: 80; Present: 78; 
For: 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 



Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

"..., while remaining sensitive to the 
recording of the entirety of the 
church's history, including all informa- 
tion regarding the younger unit". 

( )Coiicurrence ( )NonconcuTTence Date / 



29 



* 



GJ009 

Subject: Report on Strengthening 
Small Membership Churches. 

Petition: GJ-10891-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 612 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
Fon 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTeiice ( )NonconcurrenGe Date / 



30* 



GJOIO 

Subject: Report on Referral 
Regarding Council of Bishop's 
Initiative. 

Petition: GJ-10883-3000-A 
Page in Advance DCA: 596 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



31 



* 



GJOll 
Subject: Golden Cross Sunday. 

Petition: GJ-10208-0276-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 652 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For: 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Noncoiicurrence Date / 



32 



* 



GJ012 
Subject: Laity Sunday. 

Petition: GJ-12068-0275-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1 180 
Membership: 80; Present: 79; 
For: 78; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



33 GJ013 

Subject: Report on Developing 

Congregations for Deaf 

Ministries. 

Petition: GJ-10863-3000-A$ 
Page in Advance DCA: 556 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For 74; Agidnst: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee reconunends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )NonconctuTence Date / 



34* 



GJ014 

Subject: Discontinuance from 
Probationary Membership. 

Petition: GJ-10659-0418-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 619 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For: 74; Against: 1; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConciuTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 

35* GJ015 

Subject: Eligibility and Rights of 

Probationary Membership. 

Petition: GJ-10658-0413-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 619 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For: 75; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



36 



GJ016 
Subject: The Meaning of 
Membership. 

Petition: GJ-10657-0215-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 619 
Membership: 80; Present: 76; 
For: 69; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Delete words "In Matthew 18:15-17" 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



37* 



GJ017 

Subject: Quadrennial Emphasis 
on Ministries with Persons with 
Disabilities. 

Petition: GJ-10973-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 670 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
Fon 75; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 



i" 



Daily Edition VoL 4 No. 4 



160 



Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTenee ( )NonconcuiTenee Date / 



42' 



38 



GJ018 

Subject: Special Sundays without 
Church-wide Offerings. Access 
Sunday. 

Petition: GJ-10120-0275-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 651 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For. 70; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



39 



GJ019 

Subject: Special Sundays • Access 
Sunday. 

Petition: GJ-12102-0275-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1180 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For 69; Against: 7; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee reconunends nonconcur- 
renca 

( )Concurrence { )Nonconcurrencc Date / 



40 



GJ020 

Subject: The Observance of 
Heritage Sunday. 

Petition: GJ-11138-0275-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1 179 
Membership: 80; Present: 77; 
For 66; Against: 9; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrenee Date / 



41* HEOOl 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
Division of Chaplains and 
Related Ministries. 

Petition: HE-10387-1511-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 92 1 
Membership: 78; Present: 74; 
For 73; Against: 0; Not Voting. 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Coneurrence ( )NonconeurTenee Date / 



HE002 

Subject: Policy forbidding the 
bearing of arms. 

Petition: HE-11093-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1234 
Membership: 78; Present: 74; 
For 73; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



43' 



HE003 

Subject: Responsibilities of an 
Annual Conference Board of 
Higher Education and Campus 
Ministry. 

Petition: HE- 10386-0732-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 745 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For: 70; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Cancurrence ( )Noncoiicurrenoe Date / 



44* 



HE016 

Subject: Task Force to study 
merging prayer and medicine at 
United Methodist hospitals. 

Petition: HE-11094-3000-M$ 
Page in Advance DCA: 1229 
Membership: 78; Present: 74; 
For 74; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 
Committee recommends nonconcur- 



( )Coneurrence ( )Nonconcurrenee Date / 



45''' HE017 

Subject: College of Medicine 

within the Africa University. 

Petition: HE-10976-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 752 
Membership: 78; Present: 73; 
For: 73; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



46"^ 



HE019 
Subject: Schools of Theology. 

Petition: HE-10397-1530-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 750 
Membership: 78; Present: 65; 
For 65; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 



Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrenoe ( )Noiieoiicurr«nc« Date / 



47'* 



HE021 
Subject: Africa University. 

Petition: HE-11918-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1236 
Membership: 78; Present: 73; 
For 73; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date; 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConeutTence ( )Noneoncurreiice Date / 



48'* 



HE022 
Subject: Feminist Theology. 

Petition: HE-11858.3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1235 
Membership: 78; Present: 72; 
For 68; Against: 1; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 5/7 

Conmiittee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



49 



* 



HE023 

Subject: Cease giving Bachelor's 
Degrees. 

Petition: HE-11573-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1235 
Membership: 78; Present: 72; 
For 70; Against: 2; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 
( )Conciurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



50'* 



HE024 

Subject: Study guidelines on the 
use of D.D. degrees for clergy. 

Petition: HE-11095-3000-M$ 
Page in Advance DCA: 1234 
Membership: 78; Present: 72; 
For 72; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 
( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



51'* H£025 

Subject: Change the name of 

Wesley Foundation. 

Petition: HE-11572-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1235 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For 71; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 



170 



May 8, 1992 



Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



56' 



52' 



HE026 

Subject: The National Methodist 
Foundation for Christian Higher 
Education. 

Petition: HE- 10396- 1522-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 750 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For: 71; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( X^nciurence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



53' 



HE028 
Subject: Consultative 
Relationship with UM Schools of 
Theology. 

Petition: HE- 102 15- 152 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 749 
Membership: 78; Present: 64; 
For: 58; Against: 5; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



54 



HE029 

Subject: Purpose and objectives 
of the Board of Higher Education 
and Ministry. 

Petition: HE-11272-1518-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1232 
Membership: 78; Present: 64; 
Fon 58; Against: 6; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



55^ 



HE030 
Subject: Membership and 
Organizations. 

Petition: HE-10394-1517-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 749 
Membership: 78; Present: 63; 
For: 63; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurreiice Date / 



HE033 

Subject: Membership of the 
University Senate. 

Petitions: HE-10129-1517-D, HE- 

11618-1517-D, HE-12278-1517-D, HE- 

12279-1517-D. 

Pages in Advance DCA: 1230, 1230, 

1231, 1231. 

Membership: 78; Present: 65; 

For: 65; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Noiiconcurrence Date / 



57'^ 



HE034 
Subject: Board of Higher 
Education and Campus Ministry. 
Amend para. 732.1. 

Petition: HE- 10009-0732-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 745 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For: 64; Against: 4; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )NonconcuiTence Date / 



58 HE038 

Subject: Campus Ministry 

Special Program 1993-96. 

Petition: HE-11770-3000-R$ 
Page in Advance DCA: 1234 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For 70; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee reconunends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurreiice Date / 



59 HE039 

Subject: Conference Board of 

Higher Education and Campus 

Ministry. 

Petitions: HE-1 1217-0732-D, HE- 

11218-0732-D. 

Pages in Advance DCA: 1229, 1229. 

Membership: 78; Present: 71; 

For: 55; Against: 15; Not Voting: 1; 

Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



60 



* 



HE040 

Subject: Selection placement of 
pastors to the Wesley Foundation. 

Petition: HE-11570-0000-D 



Page in Advance DCA: 1229 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
Fon 69; Against; 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



c 



61' 



HE041 

Subject: Higher Education 
apportionments. 

Petition: HE-11279-1516-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 13 16 
Membership: 78; Present: 71; 
For: 68; Against: 0; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



62' 



ICOOl 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
General Commission on 
Communications. 

Petition: IC-10634-1906-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 814 
Membership: 68; Present: 54; 
For: 53; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 

63 IC002 

Subject: Communications Access 
for Persons Who Have Hearing 
and Sight Impairments. 

Petition: IC-10637-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 823 
Membership: 68; Present: 52; 
Fon 52; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



64* IC003 

Subject: Vision Interfaith 

Satellite Network. 

Petition: IC-10636-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 827 
Membership: 68; Present: 53; 
For: 53; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



171 



65' 



IC004 

Subject: Respoiuibilities of a 
Conference Commisfiion on the 
Statiu and Role of Women. 

Petition: IC- 10555-074 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 810 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
Fon 64; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
renca 

( )Concurrence ( )Noneoncurrence Date / 



66 



IC005 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on the Status and Role of Women. 

Petition: IC- 11224-074 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1238 
Membership: 68; Present: 65; 
Fon 55; Against: 9; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



67* 



IC006 
Subject: Eliminate COSROW. 

Petition: IC- 1162 1-074 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1238 
Membership: 68; Present: 65; 
For: 60; Against: 4; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



68* 



IC007 

Subject: New Historic Shrines 
and Landmarks. 

Petition: IC-10633-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 824 
Membership: 68; Present: 62; 
For: 62; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Conunittee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

WilliBmottnWillamette 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



69' 



IC008 

Subject: Historic Shrines, 
Historic Landmarks, and Historic 

Sites. 

Petition: IC-10631-1812-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 814 
Membership: 68; Present: 67; 
For: 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 



Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrenc8 Date / 



70* 



IC009 
Subject: The Historical Society. 

Petition: IC-10630-1810-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 8 12 
Membership: 68; Present: 67; 
For: 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Conmiittee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



71 



icon 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
Commission on Communication. 

Petition: IC- 12009- 1906-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1238 
Membership: 68; Present: 68; 
Fon 38; Against: 27; Not Voting: 3; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurreiice ( )Nonconcurrenee Date / 



72' 



IC012 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
Commission on Archives and 
History. 

Petition: IC-10627-0738-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 809 
Membership: 68; Present: 67; 
For: 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurreiice Date / 



73 IC013 

Subject: 'Catch the Spirit' 

Funding. 

Petition: IC-11867-3000-R$ 
Page in Advance DCA: 1249 
Membership: 68; Present: 68; 
Fon 68; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



74 



* 



IC014 

Subject: Purpose of the 
Commission on Archives and 
History. 

Petition: IC- 10628- 1803-D 



Page in Advance DCA: 811 
Membership: 68; Present: 67; 
Fon 67; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



75* IC015 

Subject: Television and radio 

advertisement campaign. 

Petition: IC-10977-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 826 
Membership: 68; Present: 68; 
Fon 68; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



76* 



IC016 

Subject: Responsibilities of the 
General Commission on Religion 
and Race. 

Petition: IC- 10557-2 108-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 815 
Membership: 68; Present: 68; 
Fon 66; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurreiicc Date / 



77* 



IC022 

Subject: Continuing Membership 
in the National Council of 
Churches. 

Petition: IC-10649-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 824 
Membership: 68; Present: 62; 
Fon 60; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Data / 



y 



78* 



IC023 

Subject: Continuing Membership 
in the World Council of Churches. 

Petition: IC-10648-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 824 
Membership: 68; Present: 62; 
Fon 60; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrenoe Date / 



172 



May 8, 1992 



79 



* 



IC024 

Subject: Conference Commission 
on Christian Unity and 
InterreligiouB Concerns. 

Petition: IC-11222-0739-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1237 
Membership: 68; Present: 63; 
For: 59; Agjdnst: 4; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



80* 



IC026 

Subject: The National Council of 
the Church of Christ in the USA 
and the World Council of 
Churches. 

Petition: IC- 11308-2402-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1243 
Membership: 68; Present: 63; 
For 61; Against: 1; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcurTence ( )Nonconcurreiice Date / 



81 



IC043 

Subject: Elimination of the 
Commission on Status and Role 
of Women. 

Petition: IC-12306-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1248 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
For 57; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( X^ncurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



82 



IC044 

Subject: Delete the Organization 
and Responsibility of the 
Commission on the Status and 
Role of Women. 
Petition: IC-10064-2201-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 124 1 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
Fon 57; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )NonconcuiTence Date / 



83 IC045 

Subject: Eliminate General 
Commission on Status and Role 
of Women. 



Petition: IC-11625-2201-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 124 1 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
Fon 57; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Coneurrence ( )Noncoiicurrence Date / 



88* 



84 



IC046 
Subject: Transfer Duties to CS. 

Petition: IC-1 1626-220 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1242 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
For 57; Against: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrcnce ( )NonconcuiTencc Date / 



85 



IC047 

Subject: Dissolve COSROW by 
1996. 

Petition: IC-11866-3000-R 
Page in Advance DCA: 1248 
Membership: 68; Present: 64; 
Fon 57; Agtiinst: 6; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )CoiicurTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



86* 



LCOOl 

Subject: The Ministry of All 
Christians. 

Petition: LC- 10840-0 102-D 
Page in Advance DCA; 828 
Membership: 89; Present: 81; 
For. 81; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuTTence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



87 



LC003 

Subject: Expression of love of 
God and neighbor in our 
churches. 

Petition: LC-11100-0107-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1250 
Membership: 89; Present: 82; 
For: 74; Against: 8; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



LC008 

Subject: Membership of the 
Council on Ministries. 

Petition: LC-11174-0258-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1266 
Membership: 89; Present: 82; 
For 81; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



c 



'11 



89 



* 



LC019 

Subject: The Chairperson of 
Worship. 

Petition: LC- 11878-026 1-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1267 
Membership: 89; Present: 82; 
For 80; Against: 2; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Conciirrence ( )Noiiconcurrence Date / 



90* 



LC037 

Subject: The Administrative 
Council or Administrative Board. 

Petition: LC-11274-0244-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1259 
Membership: 89; Present: 82; 
For: 77; Against: 3; Not Votmg: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconeurrence Date / 



91* LC040 

Subject: The Coordination of 

Communications. 

Petition: LC-12016-0262-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1267 
Membership: 89; Present: 81; 
Fon 81; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

delete: To provide other rocouroofi , 
the Coordinator of C o m m unicatiop B 
m a y d t n't il np n Cn rnm u n iir n tinnn T ank 
Forco of talontod and intoro e tod por - 
s on s approved by the Churoh 
Chargo/Council/Board to portray in 
Vidoo tho horitago of tbo congroga 
tion , it' s worship and education an d 
fellowohip activitieO ) it' s witnoea to 
childron and youth and adult s and 
familie s, and it' s miB s ion s to local and 
n a tional and world projoct Si 

( )Concurrence ( )Nonconcurrence Date / 



I- 



Daily Edition Vol 4 No. 4 



173 



92* LC041 
Subject: Coordinator of 
Communications. 

Petition: LC- 12 113-0262-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1267 
Membership: 89; Present: 80; 
For 80; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as foUows: 

Amend petition 12113: Delete 
period following the word "inter- 
preters". 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Noncancun«iice Date / 

93* LC042 

Subject: Organization and 

Administration of the Local 

Church. 

Petition: LC-10800-0244-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 834 
Membership: 89; Present: 80; 
For 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends concur- 
rence as amended as follows: 

Amend by deletion the part of the 
petition reading: Amend para.244: 



! ■ Loc a l ohMTch may ost a bliwh an A d 
mini g trativo Council , — Nurturo — Out- 
Meeh — Witnooo Miniotrio e modol 
whi a h a b a ll b« , „" 

( X^ncumncc ( )NonGoncurrence Date / 



94* 



LC043 

Subject: The Administrative 
Council - Basic Administrative 
Structure. 

Petition: LC-11727-0244-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1259 
Membership: 89; Present: 79; 
Fon 77; Against: 0; Not Voting: 2; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )Concurreiice ( )Noiicoiicurrenee Date / 



95' 



LC044 

Subject: Organization of the local 
church. 

Petition: LC-11226-0244-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1259 
Membership: 89; Present: 79; 
For 79; Against: 0; Not Voting: 0; 
Date: 5/7 



Committee recommends nonconcur- 
renca 

( )ConcuiTence ( )Nonconcurrenoe Date / 



96* 



LC045 
Subject: Local Churches 
Administrative Councils. 

Petition: LC-10226-0244-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 834 
Membership: 89; Present: 80; 
For. 77; Against: 2; Not Voting: 1; 
Date: 5/7 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( JConcurrence ( )Nonconcurrenoe Date / 



97 



LC046 
Subject: The Work Area 
Chairperson. 

Petition: LC-12015-0260-D 
Page in Advance DCA: 1266 
Membership: 89; Present: 82; 
For: 49; Against: 27; Not Voting: 6; 
Date: 5/6 

Committee recommends nonconcur- 
rence. 

( )ConcuiTence ( )NonconcuiTence Date / 





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174 



May 8, 1992 



Proceedings of the 1992 General Conference 
of The United Methodist Church 



( 



Committee On 
Journal Report 

The Committee on Journal hereby 
certifies as accurate, with the following 
corrections, the proceedings as printed 
in the Daily Christian Advocate for 
Wednesday, May 6, 1992. 

Daily Edition, p. 120, col. 1, picture 
caption-Substitute "Bellenfant" for 
"Bennenfant". 

Daily Edition, p. 136, col. 2, thu-d full 
par.--Delete "STEVENS" (second con- 
secutive reference to Stevens). 

Daily Edition, p. 137, col. 3, 11 lines 
from bottom (prior to Brandon Cho 
speech)— Insert the following: 

RHODES-WICKETT: While you're 
up, just stay up and turn to number 428 
in your hymnal, number 428, and we are 
going to sing verse 1 only for the healing 
of the nations. Verse 1, 428. 

(hymn) 

CAROL COLLEY (Oregon-Idaho): 
Brothers and sisters in Christ, although 
you might not have seen very many Na- 
tive Americans on your television 
during the aftermath of the trial, our 
hearts were there, too. Probably we 
were there, too in many of the cities. 
More than half of us do live in cities, you 
know, not just reservations, and this 
issue affects us deeply. We do under- 
stand police brutality, we do understand 
economic injustice, and we certainly un- 
derstand disregard for human rights. 
We are over-represented in the prisons, 
and as our international brothers and 
sisters know, and we should know as 
well, we also form part of the population 
of political prisoners within the United 
States. We do feel rage at the racial and 
economic injustice, not just in the cities 
but in all of the land. Native Americans 
may approach this, however, from a 
slightly different aspect than the other 
immigrant populations. For us, the issue 
is part of five hundred years of injustice, 
and we're wondering when justice will 
come. For us, the issues may be the 
issues in all of your local communities, 
actually, even maybe where all of you 
live. For us, we're wondering when 
people will understand upon whose land 



your church and your home sits; to be 
thankful for the people that made it 
possible for you to live where you live. 
We're wondering when we will not be 
seen as objects of mission and concern, 
but when the rest of our brothers and 
sisters will treat us with equality and 
respect and wish to do things in consult- 
ation with us. We're wondering when all 
of you will fully understand the neces- 
sity for the American Indian Religious 
Freedom Act, that you will know what 
that is; it's part of some of the legislation 
that's coming before you this time, and 
you will know that this is an issue that 
you should join us in supporting. We're 
wondering when all of us will under- 
stand more of each other, that you will 
understand more about the hundreds of 
tribal nations that live in the United 
States, and that those of us who are not 
from the United States will understand 
more about the indigenous peoples 
across the world whose land rights, 
human rights, religious rights are often 
the same. For five hundred years it has 
been like this for us, this is just another 
trial. When will justice come? What kind 
of world are we as Christians working 
on together? Justice has not come, ob- 
viously, for you and me, but what about 
our children? What about our 
grandchildren? What about our great- 
grandchildren? What about our great- 
great-grandchildren? 

Daily Edition, p. 138, col. 2, first full 
par.-"SHARON RHODES-WICKETT" 
for "BEVERLY J. SHAMANA". 

Daily Edition, p. 139, col. 1, immedi- 
ately prior to the word "recess"-Insert 
the following: 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you, Marvin. 
Let's try to hold the mood in force of this 
time. But let's take a 10 minute recess. 

Daily Edition, p. 139, col. 1, immedi- 
ately following the word "recess"-In- 
sert the following: 

(hymn) 

Daily Edition, p. 139, col. 1, second 
full par. -Substitute "ARTURO 
FERNANDEZ" for "UNIDENTIFIED 
SPEAKER". 

Daily Edition, p. 139, col. 2, line 25- 
Substitute "Marisa" for "Maria". 



Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 2, immedi- 
ately preceeding the word "son^"-In- 
sert the following new par.: 

Will you now sing together with me 
vs. no. 3 of 428? 

Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 2, fifth line 
from bottom-Substitute "settlements" 
for "residence". 

Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 2, last line- 
-Substitute "identify" for "end it by". 

Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 3, line 9- 
Substitute "the gospel" for 
"negotiation". Delete "unintelligible". 

Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 3, line 13- 
Substitute "the gospel" for 
"negotiation". 

Daily Edition, p. 140, col. 3, first full 
par. -Delete "TRAJKOVSKI". 

Daily Edition, pp. 142-144 are out of 
sequence. See immediately below: 

and this time I went into Koreatown 
so I could see what was going on and I 
was just ahead of the march in 
Koreatown but I was there because one 
of my churches, Wilshire Church- 
multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, multi-ra- 
cial, Black, Hispanic, Filipino, Korean, 
with a pastor for each ministry: an 
English person clergy for the senior pas- 
tor, English person American, English 
American person, a senior pastor; a 
Black woman associate pastor for the 
English ministry; and then a Korean 
pastor and a Filipino pastor and a 
Hispanic pastor. They had organized 
themselves to go into Koreatown and 
join with the clean-up movement and so 
they engaged in clean up in Koreatown 
and for the first time, my English- 
American senior pastor said that he and 
his spouse, who is also clergy in our 
district, said, we felt like we were in the 
minority, like my wife and I when we 
were in Ireland, we were marching in a 
peace march and we said we would slip 
into the crowd inconspicuously. An up- 
date on the food situation, I talked with, 
we did create a strategy group and that 
group is implementing our plan right 
now that why I can feel safe in leaving 
and coming to the General Conference 
and so I talked with the coordinator and 
he said the food at Holman is exhausted. 
We don't have any more, we need more 
food. He said that Faith Church was the 
recipient of all the contributions of food 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



175 



from the office of Senator Diane Wat- 
son. He said that Vermont Square had 
received a truck load of food from 
Ralph's Supermarket and that all of it 
had been given away, and he said that 
Hamilton is getting up to speed and the 
Korean Central Church is seeking to 
counsel persons about getting loans for 
small businesses in order to restore the 
businesses in Koreatown. 

. My friends, what we had on the shel- 
ves is exhausted and we need more 
resources, and therefore we call upon 
this General Conference to make some 
kind of response. I am sure that 
everyone of you here wants to write a 
check for $ 10, for $ 15, for $25, but I need 
more $100 gifts. I need $1,000 gifts to go 
to Los Angeles to meet human need. 
And then my friends, as this General 
Conference is seeking to respond to this 
whole matter, let me say to you, you as 
a church, we as a church, very often act 
like we have finished dealing with the 
urban ministries agenda. I say to you we 
have not yet finished with the urban 
ministries agenda. We must devote con- 
nectional resources to address the mass 
human needs in the urban scene. In our 
annual conference we are getting ready 
to mount a major fund drive. We're 
hoping to raise $25 million. We're devot- 
ing 30% of that to the School of Theol- 
ogy at Claremont. The rest is to go for 
congregational development strategy 
across the whole conference. Much of 
that is to go into bricks and mortar and 
land, but the L.A. district said no, that 
is not where the concerns are. We must 
develop a congregational development 
strategy in the city of Los Angeles that 
will address 5 major program areas: im- 
migration and refugee concerns to meet 
the needs of the new neighbors that we 
have in the city; homelessness and affor- 
dable housing; families at risk in south 
central L.A., in east L.A. and all over the 
city; churches covenanting together to 
address the whole question of drugs and 
substance abuse; and multiple mini- 
stries for regional churches through 
reconfigurations in the south central 
Los Angeles area My friends, we have 
not yet completed the urban agenda. I 
call you, let us get back to the urban 
agenda 

RHODES-WICKETT: I invite you 
now to join with us on verse 4 of our 
hymn, and I suspect we might like to 
stand as we sing this 4th verse. 



(hymn) 

BEVERLY SHAMANA: My name is 
Beverly Shamana, and I am the As- 
sociate Council Director in the Califor- 
nia-Pacific Annual Conference. Bishop, 
members of the General Conference, we 
have heard many diverse and passionate 
and moving testimonies to what has 
happened this past week and it calls to 
mind a phrase that h&s been echoing in 
my head and in my heart from 
yesterday's most powerful worship, the 
phrase being "to fill the needs of others 
as acutely as your own," and from your 
response to these various witnesses, you 
have done that. You have felt the needs 
of others as acutely as your own. This 
gathering of General Conference offers 
us a unique opportunity, one which we 
may not find ourselves in for a long time, 
and that is an opportunity to talk with 
other people from other conferences, 
from other parts of the world, from 
other parts of the country, from other 
cultures, from other races, about what is 
on our heart, what has been motivated, 
what has been inspired, what these wit- 
nesses have engendered in us. By this 
day of General Conference we know the 
persons in front of us very well by the 
shape of their neck. I would like to offer 
us an opportunity to get to know the 
shape of their soul. And so I want to ask 
you to do 3 things. Number 1 is to form , 
a small group of 4, 5, 6, 7 people, 
whereby you can share what this has 
meant to you. That is to say, how have 
you experienced the human condition of 
violence, of despair, of looting in your 
own setting, in your own church, in your 
own community, in your own family, in 
your jobs, in your cherished relation- 
ships. What shape has that taken in your 
setting? This is the common thread that 
we all share. The second thing I'd like 
you to do is to build a bridge for each 
other and with each other from your 
discussion to the various resolutions 
that you are aware of that we can impact 
by what has happened and what will 
impact us in the days ahead. And then 
the third thing after about 10 minutes 
that we are going to ask you to do is to 
share, at an open microphone, whatever 
insights, whatever learnings, whatever 
leanings come out of your discussion 
together that you would like the whole 
conference to hear. We will open the 
microphones for a brief time. And final- 
ly I woiJd say to let the Spirit do the 



translating. I urge you to speak candidly 
out of your own heart, guided by the 
grace and the Spirit that can transform 
our hearing and our speaking. So I 
would ask you now to talk to each other 
across delegations. We don't want Geor- 
gia talking to Georgia and California to 
California, but if you can even move 
around a little bit so that you can talk 
across geography, so that there can be 
the kind of cross fertilization that in- 
forms us all. I would invite the side sec- 
tions, those areas beyond the bar of the 
conference, to form some groups to talk 
so that we can bind and link up to each 
other in this way, as we are bound to 
Christ and to the church. I think we can 
do it. Let's try it, let's try it. Let's just 
move around a little bit and talk to each 
other and share. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Hold, hold your 
seats a moment. We have someone at 
microphone 14, and I'm going to recog- 
nize you and then we're gonna do this, 
depending on what happens here, but 
you're supposed to be recognized from 
your seat and then come to the 
microphone. Well I said I'm going to 
now but I'm telling you that for the 
benefit of everyone. Okay, go ahead. 

CHESTER JONES (Little Rock): Mr. 
Chairperson and delegates of the con- 
ference, 

BISHOP LEWIS: Tell us who you are. 

JONES: I'm Chester Jones from Lit- 
tle Rock, Arkansas. And I would just like 
to add another thing to this because all 
of the information has been very good 
and very insightful, and if most of you 
are like I am you have watched 
television and you have pretty well pick- 
ed up on most of the information and 
that's good because all of us are 
paralyzed with it. 

But we are gathered here as a part of 
the body of Christ, and we are a part of 
the good news community. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Chester, excuse me 
for interrupting you, but what we are 
going to do is take a few minutes as 
Beverly has outlined and then we're 
going to have some open microphone 
opportunities. 

JONES: I understand that. 

BISHOP LEWIS: You're jumping the 
gun on us. 

JONES: Well, not quite, because the 
Lord has laid something on my heart 
that I wanted to share. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Well, the Lord 
hasn't laid it on my heart, and you're out 



176 



May 8, 1992 



of order and we're going to follow this 
procedure as we started out to do and 
you'll have an opportunity in a moment. 

SHAMANA: Let us move to our 
groups for a few brief minutes, please. 
Just turn around and get acquainted 
with someone. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Take our proper 
places and return to our attention to the 
microphone and our leader Beverly. Are 
you out there listening? Let's return to 
our places and give our attention to 
Beverly. 

SHAMANA: I'm sure that your time 
of sharing with each other has been 
enlightening and a rich time. I do have 
to apologize, however, that we will not 
be able to have individuals come to the 
microphone due to the press of time. We 
had very much looked forward to this 
and I'm sure that some of you have 
things that are on your heart that you 
want to share with the entire body. Per- 
haps we can find some way to do that in 
conjunction with some of our legislative 
time. I do apologize for that because we 
had hoped that we would be able to do 
it. But at this time I do need to provide 
for the time when Bishop Kelly will 
come and bring us closing moments and 
so in order to do that I move to suspend 
the rules to permit her to come before 
us. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Is that right now or 
is that at the close? 

SHAMANA: That will be at the con- 
clusion of the resolutions. 

BISHOP LEWIS: You all understand 
that this is a motion to suspend the rules 
so that Bishop Leontine Kelly may make 
a concluding speech when we're ready 
for that. It takes a two-thirds vote and 
it's not debatable. If you would sustain 
that you may vote now. You got a green 
light? When the light's green vote yes or 
no to suspend the rules. Yes 692, no 181, 
abstention 4, so it's clearly suspended. 

JAMES LAWSON: Bishop Lewis we 
have five brief motions and I would like 
to begin moving the first one. That the 
legislative committees be asked to locate 
and mark specific issues already in their 
agendas that impact upon this matter, 
that they highlight them and lift them 
up and report them back to the Greneral 
Conference in their reports. That's my 
first motion. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Alright. Do you all 
xmderstand this motion? Are you ready 
to vote? Please vote when the light ap- 



pears. Well the vote is 714 yes, 169 no 
and 29 abstentions. 

LAWSON: The second motion 
Bishop, is that the CoimcU of Bishops 
address an urgent pastoral letter for all 
congregations of the denomination as- 
king that Pentecost be a weekend of 
prayer and fasting for the entire church. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right. You hear 
this motion. Are you ready to vote on it? 
Please vote when the light appears; 770 
yes, 147 no with 14 abstentions. 

LAWSON: The third motion, that the 
Greneral Conference issue a message to 
the nation that we select now a General 
Conference Task Force to write that 
message. And we have created a list of 
names that we would suggest might be 
on that message committee. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, do you 
hear this motion? Are you ready to vote 
on it? Please vote when the light ap- 
pears: 681 yes, 237 no, with 17 absten- 
tions. 

LAWSON: No. four, that we fast, this 
motion was passed on yesterday but we 
want to repeat it to remind us, we fast 
Thursday evening before supper and 
then for 24 hours we give our savings to 
UMCOR or as directed by the Council of 
Bishops. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Ready to vote? 
Please vote when the light appears. The 
coimt is 638 yes, 252 no, with 44 absten- 
tions. 

LAWSON: No. five, that the Council 
of Bishops call The United Methodist 
Church to the Pentecost Weekend of 
fasting and prayer, a motion already 
passed, and that they ask for an offering 
from every congregation; 50% of which 
would remain in the annual conference; 
50% to UMCOR or as directed by the 
Council of Bishops. And Bishop, I would 
move that if this is sustained then that 
we refer this to GCFA for its perusal. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Because that is 
standard procedure for us and it will be 
a part of your motion. Alright. Are you 
ready to vote? I have someone at my left. 
Go to microphone 11; well, or 6, that's 
all right. 

GEORGE CARUSO (North Indiana): 
Bishop, I'm bothered; this is a sort of 
point of order, and I'm not sure if I'm in 
order or not. When this was proposed as 
an agenda item, the implication was, as 
I understood it, there would be time to 
respond. And I appreciate the excellent 
presentation that's been given to us, but 
we've been denied the opportimity of 



responding. Will that be provided? Is 
that a point of order? Do we have to 
move it for the agenda committee, or # 
what can be done? I feel disenfranchised ^ 
as a member of this General Conference; 
I was not allowed to respond. (Applause) 

LAWSON: Bishop, I think our group 
agrees, but we were trying to do it within 
the time limit and we overran the time, 
and so we were trying to compress it so 
that we could finish by the 12:30 hour. 
Of course, it's 12:00 now, so as far as I'm 
concerned there can be responses if we 
want to do it. We did not want to come 
back with motions at another session. 

BISHOP LEWIS: It's been suggested 
that if we vote on the motions, we may 
have a little time for some response. But 
we opted to go with the motions so they 
wouldn't be left out, and if they go as 
well as the other four have, we've got 
about 10 minutes. 

BILL CROUCH (North Texas): Ques- 
tion as to the motion that we take an 
offering, can you be more specific about 
that? To what would it be intended? 
What's the point? 

LAWSON: The offering would be 
direct 50% remaining in the Annual 
Conference for ministries related to this 
matter in their own area, 50% to 
UMCOR as directed by the Council of 
Bishops. We hesitate about this because, 
while the immediate needs we must 
meet-that is, food, clothing, shelter, 
and so forth and so on-that there's also 
the whole business of rebuilding, of 
work for change, so that we don't want 
to make it inflexible (the offering), so 
that it goes only to emergency relief, but 
to make it also possible to be used for 
other kinds of ministries and mission. 

CROUCH: I simply wanted to give you 
the opportimity to tell us what we are 
giving our money for. Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you. I recog- 
nize at Microphone 3. Yes, go ahead, Joe. 

C. JOSEPH SPRAGUE (West Ohio): 
I move to amend by addition, if that's in 
order. 

BISHOP LEWIS: It is. 

SPRAGUE: That in solidarity and 
consultation with indigenous persons 
and local churches in a selected neigh- 
borhood, The United Methodist Church 
commit itself to the creation in Los An- 
geles of a "shalom zone." A shalom zone 
would be one strategically-located city ^ 
block or its equivalent rebuilt with the ^ 
necessary buildings, businesses, and so- 
cial services needed for life, liberty, and 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



177 



the pursuit of meaning. To create this 
ft\ shalom zone, The United Methodist 
^ Church, working through the national 
division, would issue a call posthaste for 
staff and volunteers, money such as that 
just mentioned, and the material, love, 
and labor to rebuild both physical struc- 
tures and human lives broken by the 
cycle of poverty and deprivation. The 
response to this call in money and 
people would be coordinated through 
the Los Angeles Planning and Strategy 
Committee. Let the call go forth for 
workers with children and youth, com- 
munity organizers, M.D.'s, nurses, den- 
tists, counselors, lawyers, business 
people, architects, contractors, plum- 
bers, electricians, and all who are willing 
to help. To this army of shalom would 
be added an intentional remnant of per- 
sons small in number, but large in the 
love of Jesus, who would commit them- 
selves to live as neighbors and urban 
missioners in the shalom zone for an 
extended period of time so as to claim 
the shalom zone for Christ. Once this 
model is in the process of being 
developed. The United Methodist 
Church would invite the ecumenical and 
interfaith communities of this nation to 
duplicate our effort by creating similar 
zones of hope. This propossJ, to be 
referred to the Legislative Section on 
Global Ministries for the development 
of implementing strategies, attendant 
budgets, and reported to GCNFA and to 
the plenary as soon as possible. 

BISHOP LEWIS: If there is a second? 

SPRAGUE: I don't think I need to 
speak any further. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Alright, it has a 
second. Does the committee wish to 
respond? 

LAWSON: Well, we heard the spirit, 
Joe, of that. Bishop, we heard the spirit 
from Joe's amendment and we are 
prepared to accept it and incorporate it 
to the best of our ability. 

BISHOP LEWIS: The committee says 
they will accept that amendment. Is that 
right? 

LAWSON: Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Are you ready to 
vote? All who will . . . Well, please vote 
when the light appears. I've got a big 
sign right here in front of me if I were 
) smart enough to read it. And the vote is 
631 yes, 265 no, 31 abstentions. 

LAWSON: We have the main motion 
before us now. Bishop. That was an 
amendment. 



BISHOP LEWIS: No. 

LAWSON: No? 

BISHOP LEWIS: That was a main 
motion. 

LAWSON: OK. We accepted it. 

BISHOP LEWIS: You accepted it and 
that's it. 

LAWSON: We have been asked to an- 
nounce that we want to emphasize the 
fact that already many, many . . . for 
many, many agencies of the church, we 
have received resources and offers of 
solidarity and a willingness to be able to 
plan and work with our Los Angeles 
Area. But we want to remember that 
there are other areas also in great need, 
San Francisco as an example. UMCOR 
has already sent the first $50,000 first 
grant to the Cal-Pac Conference. They 
have already established an advance 
number and that number is 901735-2. 
901735-2 is the advance number. It 
should also be said that Church World 
Service has been in conversations with 
many of our people, with our congrega- 
tions, our leadership in the area, and 
that a variety of other kinds of Protes- 
tant, primarily church organizations 
and concerned groups have been in con- 
versation. We appreciate that very 
much. And now, I think, to bring the 
concluding reflection is Bishop Leon- 
tine Kelly. 

BISHOP LEONTINE KELLY: I think 
we have heard the word. Tonight, 
remember the words of Henri Nouwen, 
"When a little boy asked the prophet, 
'Dear prophet, why do you keep 
prophesying when nobody listens to 
your words and when nobody changes 
their life?' And the answer that question 
was and always will be, 'I prophesy not 
simply to change the world, but to 
prevent the world from changing me.' " 
It seems to me, that as we in this General 
Conference come together that what we 
are about all week is not only the aware- 
ness of what has happened in a par- 
ticular place, in Los Angeles, and in San 
Francisco, and ripples in other areas, 
but to understand that we eis a country 
sit on a powder keg, the chickens have 
come home to roost, we look not only 
historically, but biblically and theologi- 
cally, in terms of what our task is, what 
our mandate is, as disciples of Jesus 
Christ, and that is to love one another 
and we have not done it. And yet we 
have the opportunity, and what a wit- 
ness of diversity we are as we sit together 
here! What a democratic opportunity 



this is. What a democratic instrument 
this is as the General Conference of The 
United Methodist Church. One of the 
most democratic institutions in the 
world. And we need to go home and help 
people understand what it means to be 
United Methodist. It is not to affirm 
their fears, it is to disturb their comfort 
so that they might live out their faith. 
Just a few things. If we do not prioritize 
education in this country, for all 
children and for all people, we will never 
come to an understanding. We have left 
... we have . . . You don't have to applaud 
me, just let me finish a minute. We have 
left . . . dare to leave the educational 
funding of our country to the lottery, 
because they promised it. Aa 
Methodists, we have never sustained 
gambling, but if you are going to have 
lotteries, I want to put defense on lot- 
teries find put money in our budgets to 
educate people. We are a democracy. We 
cannot be a democracy if we do not 
know that fundamental to any 
democratic freedom-justice process is an 
understanding of what we are about, 
and we should be about the business of 
that. When a young man said to me, and 
many of you heard me say it, a young 
community director said to me, "Bishop 
Kelly, don't you understand that the 
gang system in this country is to the 
crime syndicate as the Junior Achieve- 
ment Program is to corporate America." 
It is not that our children cannot learn 
what it means to be moral, spiritual 
people, it is that we have tolerated who 
will teach them. As I stood in Jones 
United Methodist Church and preached 
a funeral of a 23-year-old Black man, 
shot down by drive-by shooting, I 
counted 45 young Black mides between 
the ages 17 and 24 £is they came into the 
church to the funeral of their brother. 
There they were in full dress, burgundy 
bow ties, burgundy boutonnieres, bur- 
gundy cummerbunds. I thought to 
myself, "It looks like a prom scene, but 
I know it is the Godfather." And that is 
the symbol of our country, and that is 
the model of violence that we have sus- 
tained in our public arena and in our 
militarism and with our thinking this 
week contextualized by the Bishops' 
statement, the Bishops' vision, the 
Bishops' commitment to the total pic- 
ture, we have an agenda to work on. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. Christ, have 
mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon 
us. We cannot afford to be the church 



178 



May 8, 1992 



that in the 18th Century was accused of 
being seditious, because it dared to 
stand in 18th Century England for mar- 
ginalized people. We cannot claim that 
history and continue to be such a com- 
fortable, pure church. We cannot be 
ministers of the gospel if we are not 
willing to hit the streets where the 
people are. 

H. Sharon Howell, 

Chair: Committee on Journal 

Section C, row 8 

(Wednesday morning session con- 
tinued from page 144) 

I am not merely a bishop of the 
church. I pride myself that this year, my 
bishop has permitted me to be a part- 
time interim supply pastor of Ridge 
View United Methodist Church in San 
Francisco. And I preach the Word to 
people of despair, overwhelmed by the 
problems, and wondering where they 
are. What does God have to do with what 
is happening in their lives? And the dif- 
ference between that is not a dichotomy, 
it is the enfleshed word that comes in 
Jesus Christ to say to us who we are and 
why we are here. And the moment, the 
challenge is to say individually, each one 
of us, "Lord, here I am, let your Spirit 
move through my life and change it and 
cleanse me as I repent myself of all that 
I have not done, and then Lord, use me 
individually and lead me corporately 
into the church of Jesus Christ around 
the world so that this can indeed be the 
world of Jesus Christ." Will you pray 
with me? 

(prayer) 

CHESTER JONES aittle Rock): I 
come to speak at this time in the name 
of Jesus only. I think that we will be 
remiss if there are 2 or 3 things that we 
don't do as delegates. We're to choose 
this day whom we will serve and some 
are putting off to later on, it's not going 
to address some immediate needs that 
we need to do as delegates. So I would 
urge us to take up an offering now, to be 
taken by the district superintendent and 
a bishop to meet with the person from 
UMCOR that's already out there in 
California; to take our concerns and our 
prayers from the delegates of this con- 
ference to them; to let them know that 
we stand with them in this time of crisis. 
By June there may not be a California 
left out there to go to. So I urge us to 
support them. Also I would call upon us 



to send a message to the President and 
the Attorney General voicing our sup- 
port for the investigation of the possible 
violation of the civil rights of Rodney 
King. And that we also send a message 
to the President, the governor of 
California and the mayor of Los An- 
geles, that we as the body of Christ, the 
Good News Community, are taking a 
day out of this conference to be in prayer 
and fasting for the healing, not only of 
California, but the whole nation. Then 
finally I would affirm that we, in order 
to affirm our faith before we close and 
go to eat our last meal before we fast, to 
stand together and join in a song in 
affirmation that we are one in the Spirit, 
we are one in our Lord, and we pray that 
all unity will one day be restored. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Was that a motion? 
Did it have a second? Well, if you are 
going to debate it, you are going to have 
to extend time because we are already 
past 12:20. I hear people sajdng so 
moved, but you know, you all, well, all 
right, all who will support this please 
vote when the light appears. The count 
is 370 yes, 382 no, and 67 abstain. So the 
motion failed. We are on the order of the 
day for reports from the Committee on 
the Agenda. Point of order. 

EUZABETH SWEET (Southern New 
England): Bishop, I'm not sure how to 
present this, but a whole bunch of us 
didn't know whether we were voting for 
this motion or whether we were voting 
to extend the time. Confusion and we 
couldn't get your attention. 

BISHOP LEWIS: WeU, there never 
was a motion to extend the time and the 
only motion before the House was the 
motion by the man from Little Rock. 
Unless the House asks me to do some- 
thing different, we're going to go on. I 
see someone at microphone 13. 

DON MESSER (Rocky Mountain): 
Bishop Lewis, unintentionally we did 
get confused, even though apparently 
there wasn't motion to extend the time 
because you mentioned that if we were 
going to debate the motion that we 
would have to have the time extended, 
so many of us were confused. If there is 
any way for us to vote dearly on the 
motion that was before us it would be 
very helpful. 

BISHOP LEWIS: You would have to 
move to reconsider. 

MESSER: I would move to reconsider 
it. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Did you vote for it? 



MESSER: Well, I voted against ex- 
tending the time. # 

BISHOP LEWIS: You lost your vote, ' 
Don. I recognize the man to my right to 
microphone 4. 

RICHARD NICODEMUS (New 
York) : I voted for the motion and I would 
like to ask for reconsideration by the 
body. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Is there a second? 
All who will reconsider it? Please vote 
when the light appears. The vote is to 
reconsider. The count is 529 yes, 390 no, 
12 abstentions. You are right. It is a 
simple majority to reconsider. Now we 
have to have a motion to extend the time 
to do this. Otherwise we are going to go 
to the agenda. Microphone 8. 

KENT MILLARD (South Dakota): 
Bishop, I move that we extend the time 
so we can take this vote. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, do we have 
a second? Please vote if you will extend 
the time when the light appears. 
Whether you extend the time or not. 
The time is extended. And the vote for 
that is 499 yes, 418 no, 9 abstentions. 
And we are back to the motion of 
Chester Jones from Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas. I think I see a flag back at 14. 

MAXTE DUNNAM (Memphis Con- 
ference): In his motion there were 2 
items about sending messages. In the 
committee report there was also an item 
about sending a message. Will the com- 
mittee that is writing the message to be 
sent somewhere report back to this 
body, and could his request for the mes- 
sage to be sent to the President and the 
mayors be included in that? 

LAWSON: Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: I recognize the man 
on my right. Go to microphone 5. 

ROBERT SWEET (Southern New 
England): Bishop, I would like to move 
to amend the motion to ask that 
GCF&A be directed to investigate and to 
report back to this session of the 
General Conference the possibility of 
establishing a pool of $25,000,000 from 
investment portfolios of the Board of 
Global Ministries, the Board of Pen- 
sions, and other such agencies as may 
have such resources to be used to 
guarantee loans and mortgages to rees- 
tablish biasinesses in Los Angeles. Fur- 
ther, that the Council of Bishops ^Aj) 
challenge the other denominations of 
our Christian faith to join in creating a 
pool of matching funds. 



DaUy Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



179 



BISHOP LEWIS: Is there a second? 
m) All right, we have an amendment before 
us. I recognize the speaker on my left. 
Go to microphone 2. 

J. LaVON KINCAID (Western Pen- 
nsylvania): I want to speak against the 
amendment and therefore support the 
main motion and I will leave it at that. 
Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, thank yoa 
Is there anyone that wants to speak for 
it? Anyone else want to speak? All right, 
please vote when light appears on the 
amendment that you just heard. Yes 
141, no 786, abstained 17. The amend- 
ment is lost. We're back on the main 
motion. Go to microphone 2. 

PAUL MEUSCHKE (Western Pen- 
nsylvania): There are 3 statements to be 
framed which we are going to be con- 
sidering later. I would like the names of 
the committee members who will be 
framing those statements. I believe that 
Brother Lawson mentioned that such a 
committee is in place, and I just think 
the body ought to be aware of who those 
people are in case we might want to add 
to that committee or subtract from it. 

LAWSON: If that's in order. Bishop, 
I'm prepared to remain to the main mo- 
tion. All right, Bishop, we've listed a 
number of people, but the General Con- 
ference, of course, can add other names. 
Robert Fannin, none of these persons 
has been asked, incidentally. We tried to 
list some folk that we thought could do 
it. Robert Fannin from Southeast, 
Maxie Dunnam from Southeast, Randy 
Day from the Northeast, Boris Traj- 
kovski from the Yugoslavia conference, 
Beverly Shamana from the West, Phil 
Wogaman from the Northeast, Carol 
CoUcy from the West, Brandon Cho 
from the West, Arturo Fernandez from 
the West, Felton May from the North- 
east, Tex Sample from the South 
Central, Bernard Keels from the North- 
east, Jeannie Trevino-Teddlie from the 
Southeast, Anna Reed from the North- 
east, Sam Wynn from the Southeast, 
Sharon Brown Christopher from the 
North Central. Those are the names 
that we suggested. 

MEUSCHKE: Thank you very much. 
That's a great committee. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, I recog- 
A nize the man at the rear of my left at 
microphone 12. 

BILLY YORK (North Alabama): I 
would like to move the reference to the 



main motion to the committee which 
has made the morning presentation. 

BISHOP LEWIS: I have a 2nd to the 
motion in reference. All right, the mo- 
tion referred to the committee. 

YORK: Bishop, it seems to me there 
are severjd matters to be coordinated, 
then I would appreciate if we could have 
that coordinated and brought back to 
this body. Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, we have a 
motion for reference. Anyone else want 
to say anything? I see a woman at 
microphone 7. 

LUCILLE VANZANT (Oklahoma): 
Bishop, there wjis one item in that mo- 
tion that I think we really need to take. 
Beginning with us at this moment to 
consider and that is that we have an 
offering for this body. I came to the 
General Conference with very little 
money, but my heart is so big that 
whatever that I can leave to help al- 
leviate any suffering at all, I'm willing to 
give that up; so I ask that that part of the 
motion be considered at this time. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Yeah, all right, we 
hear that and I see a card at this time off 
to my left. Microphone 11 

DEBBIE WILCOCK (Eastern Pen- 
nsylvania): I just have a question, of all 
the names that you listed are any of 
those youth that'll be on the committee? 

LAWSON: We have a motion to refer 
and we passed that by. I'm sorry. 

WILCOCK: Can I just have the ques- 
tion answered, please? 

BISHOP LEWIS: Would you do it 
later? In a minute. Well, let us vote on 
the motion. The reference motion. They 
probably need to check whether they got 
a youth on that list or not. We're on the 
reference motion. Does this have to do 
with that? If it is go to microphone 13. 

CLIFTON IVES (Maine): Question to 
the Chair. I understand in the direct 
statement, first a question to the Chair 
would be in reference to the committee 
mentioned. It seems to me that the com- 
mittee is a wonderful committee, has 
done a wonderful job for us this morn- 
ing. Is it an official body of this General 
Conference to which a matter can be 
legitimately referred by the body? 

BISHOP LEWIS: Well, unless I hear 
a wisdom from here somewhere to the 
contrary. It is if you all make it so, and 
it seems that by what you're doing 
you've already done that 5 times. All 
right, let's vote on the reference to com- 



mittee if you're ready. I don't want to 
run over anybody. Go to 14, Chester. 

JONES: I oppose the motion to refer 
simply because all the things that I listed 
in that motion we can do now. Jesus 
said, now is the time. That's my problem 
if we refer this, we don't know, it wiU 
probably be the next day, so I oppose the 
motion to refer and let us vote on the 
main motion. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, we've had 
a speech opposed to reference. I see 
someone on my right. Go to microphone 
5. 

JAMES THOMPSON (North Geor- 
gia): Bishop, I'm concerned about the 
point one of our delegates rtdsed earlier. 
I deeply appreciate the presentation 
that this committee has made to the 
conference today, and I'm in favor so 
very much of all that we are doing; but I 
do raise the question as to whether we 
can refer to this committee. It does not 
have a legal status so far as this con- 
ference is concerned. It has not been 
appointed; it has not been elected. We 
don't even know who they are. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Well, what do you 
want to do about it? I just think that you 
heard them named, and you have 
referred 5 items to them already and 
you've done it by a substantial minority. 
If you don't want them to be a commit- 
tee of this body, you better stop them 
now. I'm just the Chair. Off to my right, 
please. 

JAMES HOLSINGER (Virginia): I 
would like to amend the motion to refer 
by referring instead of this committee to 
the Legislative Committee of Global 
Ministries. 

BISHOP LEWIS: We have an amend- 
ment to the amendment. We have a 
point of order. 

HOLSINGER: Motion 3 that I made 
earlier this morning. Read thusly, that 
there will be a messsige from the General 
Conference to the nation. The General 
Conference will create a task force to 
write that message. Then I said that we 
had names to suggest in that committee 
and that motion did pass. 

BISHOP LEWIS: That is what I 
thought I was sajdng. Here in front of 
me. Go to 3. 

GLENN KOHLHEPP (Western Pen- 
nsylvania): I would like to move the pre- 
vious question on everything that is 
before us. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right. That is in 
order. Second. All right, it takes a 2/3 



180 



May 8, 1992 



vote. Please vote on the call for vote on 
everything before us when the light ap- 
pears. First we got the amendment to 
the amendment. The vote is 820 yes, 91 
no, 18 abstentions. So, we're going to 
vote. And we first vote on an amend- 
ment to an Eimendment vote for refer- 
ence. Okay, I'm hearing voices again. If 
this is a question take it to microphone 
11. 

RILEY CASE (North Indiana): My 
question is, which committee are we 
referring this to? There was a committee 
that made a presentation. And then 
there is another committee that is dif- 
ferent from that that was named, that 
was to draft a letter. Which committee? 

BISHOP LEWIS: The main motion 
on this reference is to Global Ministries. 
But we have an amendment to that 
referring it to the legislative committee. 
The amendment to the amendment is to 
the legislative committee on Global 
Ministries. That is what we are voting 
on right now. Please vote when the light 
appears. 

All right, this motion lost 439 yes, 482 
no, and 19 abstentions, and we are back 
to the amendment. I see a card back here 
at the right; go to 14 or 15. Microphone 
15. 

JINNY GORDON (Central Illinois): 
Bishop, we're having so much con- 
fusion. This is so important. It seems the 
body is askingus to deal with it effective- 
ly. Please be very, very clear what we are 
voting on each time. We are getting so 
many things thrown at us. Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: This is a motion to 
refer the amendment to the committee 
that has been reporting to us this morn- 
ing. That's what we are on now, and go 
to microphone 4, please. 

ELEANOR RICHARDSON (North 
Georgia): Question, please, Bishop. 
Would it be in order to ask for division 
of this question? There seems to be 
reluctance to vote, but I think that there 
is a real urge to take that offering as we 
exit. 

BISHOP LEWIS: If you made a mo- 
tion to divide it for the offering. 

RICHARDSON: I asked for your 
opinion. It would be all right for me to 
do that? 

BISHOP LEWIS: Yes. 

RICHARDSON: Bishop? 

BISHOP LEWIS: We're sorry; we are 
all three confused back here. We are 
imder the previous question, so it's not 
in order. It's not in order. Are you ready 



to . . . you want to vote, don't you? I do, 
too. I'm not supposed to express what I 
want, I guess. Take microphone 11. 

PAT STROMAN (Central Texas): 
Parliamentary inquiry. Under our plan 
of organization, 11 #1E: Proposals, 
questions, communications, resolu- 
tions, and other matters not included in 
the regular business of the General Con- 
ference shall be referred to the Commit- 
tee On Agenda without motion or 
debate. Where are we in that process? 

BISHOP LEWIS: It isn't applicable to 
what we are doing now. 

STROMAN: It is not? 

BISHOP LEWIS: We're going to put 
the motion to refer this. All right. If 
you're in favor of the motion to refer- 
ence, please vote when the light appears. 
You're supposed to vote yes or no when 
the light appears. AH right, yes. It is 
referred. The vote is 60 lyes, 290 no and 
3 1 abstentions. All right, we will call on 
Don Ott to bring the agenda report to 
us. 

DONALD OTT (Wisconsin): We have 
a plan that is in place that's printed in 
the DCA distributed to you today. You 
wiU convene as legislative committees 
beginning at 2:30 this afternoon. Our 
encouragement to all of you in legisla- 
tive committees from your sigenda com- 
mittee is to help your officers get at the 
calendar items and create them just as 
soon as possible. A reminder of 1988: we 
were 1/3 of the way through the entire 
General Conference with only 6% of the 
petitions dealt with. We're considering 
giving a Kermit the frog poster as a gift 
to the legislative committee that gets the 
first 25 calendar items produced. Let's 
go to it. 2:30 this afternoon. Our recom- 
mendation to you for tomorrow: 8:30 
a.m., plenary; for worship, 9 a.ni.; for 20 
minutes, Africa University Report, in- 
cluding a video; 9:20 a-m., for 5 minutes, 
the Courtesies Committee; and then the 
usual agenda, presiding officer, and an- 
nouncements with adjournment tomor- 
row morning to legislative committees 
at 9:30 a.m. Bishop, our recommenda- 
tions. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, thank you. 
All right, we have a report from Allen 
Norris, the Presiding Officers Commit- 
tee, and I'm relieved to hear that. 

ALLEN NORRIS (North Carolina): 
Bishop Lewis and members of the 
General Conference, your Committee 
on Presiding Officers has asked Bishop 
Dan E. Solomon of Oklahoma to be the 



presiding bishop at the Thursday morn- 
ing session, May 7th. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, it looks 
like something urgent is over by 
microphone 11. So one of you, just one 
of you, go to the microphone, please. 

DEBBIE WILCOCK: You said that I 
would have my question answered. Just 
simple point: I would be more than will- 
ing to talk with Rev. Lawson afterwards 
if that would make it any better. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Yes, that is an over- 
sight, and we would be delighted to have 
those names. 

DEBBIE WILCOCK: Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, I recog- 
nize the man on my right. Microphone 
9 or 4. rU tell you which one he is going 
to in a minute. He is going to 4. 

ROBERT CASEY (Virginia): Bishop, 
there is a good bit of disturbance about 
the fact that this committee has not 
been officially named. I move that the 
General Conference name the people or 
appoint the people, name the people 
who have been named as the official 
committee of the General Conference 
for this purpose and that they add to it 
a youth to be selected. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right, do we have 
a second? AU right, you want to vote on 
this? You want to speak to this? All 
right. Go to microphone 8. 

FRANK DORSEY (Kansas East): I 
noticed in that list that there is only 1 
person from the South Central Jurisdic- 
tion. No, in the South Central Jurisdic- 
tion there is only 1 person, and I want 
to be s\ire that there is at least another 
person. Is it appropriate to suggest a 
name at this point, before we elect 
them? 

BISHOP LEWIS: I think we thought 
there were 2. Janie Trevino Tedley and 
Tex Sample. AU right, I see someone 
back by microphone 13. No, the other 
phone. 

CHARLIE DENNIS (Mmnesota): I 
would like to speak against the motion 
to elect these persons at this time. As I 
understood the original recommenda- 
tions that we voted on, this was a refer- 
ence to the CouncU of Bishops. There is 
a process. It's stiU an open process, and 
there ought to be some negotiations and 
some work done siround that. I would 
urge us not to elect these persons at this 
time and to trust that suggested process. 

BISHOP LEWIS: AU right you've 
heard that. I see a flag at 8 or on its way 
to 8. 



( 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



181 



WILLIAM K QUICK (Detroit): As we 
heard the names, Bishop, there was only 
one name from the North Central Juris- 
diction, and that was Bishop Chris- 
topher. And if it's in order, we would like 
to suggest the name of Phylemon Titus, 
the district superintendent of the 
Detroit East District. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Do you accept that, 
too? 

LAWSON (California-Pacific): Yes. 

BISHOP LEWIS: It is accepted. 

LAWSON: Bishop, may I have a point 
of order? On this last reference motion, 
there were 2 motions that we made. One 
motion asked for a pastor£d letter from 
the Council of Bishops; the second mo- 
tion was a task force to write a message 
from the General Conference to the na- 
tion. That task force would bring that 
message back to the General Con- 
ference for Genersd Conference pur- 
poses and approval or disapproval. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, we are on 
a motion to make it official that we elect 
this committee, and it's being perfected. 
I see someone back to my right waving 
a flag. 14, please. 

MAXINE ALLEN (Little Rock): 
Bishop, I would like to amend the mo- 
tion by including the name of Rev. 
Chester Jones, and if I get a second, I'd 
like to speak to that. 

BISHOP LEWIS: It's accepted. 
They're in a good humor. I see hands 
back to my left. Go to microphone 12, 
green. 

ELSIE CRICKARD (Kansas West): I'd 
like to make an amendment. It was 
made a motion that we add one youth to 
the committee. To think of one youth 
speaking for all of the church for the 
future, I'd like to make it, amend that it 
be a youth from each jurisdiction. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Oh, boy. Do we have 
a second to that amendment? Do we 
have a second? Stick a hand up, at least, 
if there is one. All right, it is seconded. 
So we have an amendment to add a 
youth from each jurisdiction. 
Microphone 2. 

KINCAID: Sir, Mr. Bishop, if I'm in 
order, I'd like to move the previous ques- 
tion and all that is before us. 

BISHOP LEWIS: That's in order. 

KINCAID: Thank you. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All who wQl call the 
previous question, please vote when the 
light appears. All right. We cedled the 
question by a vote of 829 yes, 69 no, and 
10 abstentions. And we will first vote on 



an amendment to add a youth from each 
jurisdiction. I hear a point of order. Yes? 

JAMES HOLSINGER (Virginia): 
Bishop, I rarely take any disagreement 
with my friend Bob Casey, being also 
from Virginia, but I think we're in bit of 
a problem right now, because I under- 
stood the referral motion that you led us 
through to be referral to the committee 
that brought this material to us this 
morning. As it stands right now, the 
thing we're going to vote on is to refer it 
to the new committee that's going to do 
the writing. And I think that leaves us 
potentially in a bit of a dUemma. 

BISHOP LEWIS: WeU, I'm not sure 
what your confusion is. I, you know, 
there are 900 of you all out there, and I 
can't share your confusion. 

HOLSINGER: Bishop, I understood 
that when we voted on the referral that 
we were dealing with a . . . you indicated 
that it was to the committee. The in- 
dividuals have brought the issue to us 
this morning. We never heard what that 
list of names is. We have another list of 
names which are a writing committee, 
which we are now indicating that we are 
going to refer this other motion to, 
material to. I think that if I understood 
what you said correctly, that we do have 
a problem, because unless we know the 
names of the group that brought us the 
thing originally, we're in 2 different 
groups. 

LAWSON: I think that the Chester 
Jones motion which is referred to the 
Planning Committee which is a very 
large group which brought the presenta- 
tion in this morning, that's the motion 
I heard. And they will take that motion 
and probably refer it properly. I would 
say to you, for example, the indication of 
a need for an offering, we have suggested 
the day of fasting, and prayer, and the 
savings be given. So we will come back 
with a motion as to when that offering 
can be taken. Maybe Thursday evening 
or Friday evening after the fast day. 
That's a possibility we'll talk about. We 
met until 1:30 this morning. I guess we'll 
meet until 1:30 tomorrow morning to 
make those kinds of decisions if you 
referred that to us. The message com- 
mittee is a different group. 

BISHOP LEWIS: All right, we're 
going to vote now on a motion to add one 
youth from each jurisdiction to this 
committee, the writing and message 
committee. Please vote when the light 
appears. All right. It is voted down. The 



vote is 279 yes, 630 no, and 9 absten- 
tions. Now we're on motions to make 
the election of this committee official. 
And please vote when the light appears. 
And it is done. The vote is 699 yes, 200 
no, and 16 abstentions. And we're ready 
for announcements, and Carolyn Mar- 
shall ouj- secretary wiU take us through 
those. I see another flag at the back to 
13. Yeah, I'm with you all; go ahead. 

DAVE STANLEY (Iowa): With great 
regret. Bishop Lewis, can we have the 
motion read back that we adopted this 
morning on the time of the fast? I point 
out on p. 106 yesterday, a fast was 
recommended from Thursday evening 
to Friday noon. Someone thought they 
heard it through Friday evening and the 
motion this morning. The Iowa delega- 
tion thought it had a lunch scheduled 
Friday noon. We'd kind of like to know. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Yeah, I'm aware of 
some of that confusion. Jim's going to 
straighten us out. 

LAWSON: All right. The motion said, 
as amended by Maxie Dunnam, from 
Thursday dinner to Friday after lunch. 
We suggest 24 hours and I suggest if you 
have a lunch on Friday already 
scheduled, then maybe you start 
Thursday noon and so forth. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you. We're 
back on my left. Microphone 11. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: Bishop, 
this is an item concerning the agenda for 
tomorrow. I don't know when I can 
make it if I don't do it now. Is this a 
proper time? 

BISHOP LEWIS: I don't think so. I'm 
going to say no. I want to get this over 
with like about 95% of the rest of these 
people. 

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKER: Can 
you tell me when I can make it? 

BISHOP LEWIS: You can ask the 
next presiding officer. See, the Agenda 
Committee is the obvious thing to do 
first of all, not . . . But . . . I'm trying to 
tell the fellow back there to go to 
microphone 12. 1 hope this is something 
worthwhile. 

LEON HAMRICK (North Alabama): 
Bishop, I move that we hear the an- 
nouncements and dismiss . . . ac^ourn. 

BISHOP LEWIS: WeU, that's a good 
idea. I've been trying to get you to do 
that. Go ahead, Carolyn. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: All right 
There are 2 announcements here which 
are fairly parallel, to the effect that 
several persons have not picked up their 



182 



May 8, 1992 



tickets for the Sunday host event; and 
encouraging all of you who have not 
done so to do so as soon as possible, 
because there are other persons who 
would like to have those tickets if you do 
not plan to use them. The disparity 
comes on whether you would get them 
from the local committee office or the 
information desk. Both of them are not 
too far apart, so I would suggest that you 
take care of that this afternoon. The 
African delegates are invited to meet for 
a few minutes at the translation pool 
side of the plenary hall when the plenary 
ac^ourns this afternoon. 

CAEOLYN MARSHALL: The Coun- 
cil of Bishops will meet Thursday morn- 
ing May 7th at 9:15 a.m. in the 
conference theater at the Hyatt Hotel. 
Reference Committee is to meet unme- 
diately upon adjournment in room 101. 
And this one of an entirely different 
nature, one that would be of concern to 
all of us here at General Conference. Dr. 
Paul Blankenship, a clergy member of 
this body from the Memphis Con- 
ference, was called home because a 
grandchild was desperately ill. The re- 
quest is that we remember him and that 
family in prayer. 

BISHOP LEWIS: Thank you, 
Carolyn, and Bishop Roy Nichols will 
come and lead us in a closing prayer. 

BISHOP ROY NICHOLS: 

(Prayer and Adjournment) 

Thursday Morning 
May 7, 1992 

Bishop Dan E. Solomon, presiding 

(song) 

(benediction) 

(song) 

BISHOP DAN E. SOLOMON: Let us 
be in order. We're deeply grateful to 
Bishop Felton May and Phyllis May for 
leading us in worship in significant 
ways. Bishop May, thank you for both a 
convicting and a compelling message to 
us. We're deeply grateful also to the per- 
sons who have led us in our music this 
morning, and we do express gratitude to 
them as well. Sisters and brothers, we 
prepare ourselves now to hear a report 
reflecting one of the most visionary and 
courageous initiatives that we United 
Methodists have undertaken since the 
birth of The United Methodist Church 



in 1968. Africa University is one of 
United Methodism's bold efforts to ad- 
dress the systemic causes of hunger, in- 
adequate health care, prejudice, and 
disenfranchisement by helping to edu- 
cate men and women in a private, value- 
centered university, who are ready to lift 
up the mission of Christ as they are 
ready to undertake the education of 
global leaders. I turn now to Dr. Roger 
Ireson for this presentation on Africa 
University. Excuse me, I'll turn now to 
Bishop Ben Oliphint. 

BISHOP BEN OLIPHINT: Thank 
you, Bishop Solomon. My name is Ben 
Oliphint. I have the privilege of serving 
as president of the Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry. About 100 
years ago a bishop, of all people, saw a 
vision. He was a missionary in Zim- 
babwe, and he climbed a mountain in 
one of the most beautiful valleys of Zim- 
babwe, and he had a dream. He dreamed 
that one day children would come from 
many nations to learn at the school 
there at that mission station. That 
dream is coming true. Four years ago 
you took a giant step to make it possible. 
Last April Nancy and I were there for 
the ground breaking of Africa Univer- 
sity. On that day, which was a beautiful 
day, as we came to that beautiful valley 
at the site where the university will be 
built, there were hundreds and 
himdreds of people in buses and cars 
and on foot-many of them walking 
many mOes to come for that marvelous 
occasion. There was singing and danc- 
ing, and the people of the church in 
Zimbabwe had fixed lunch for over 4,000 
people. It was a great occasion. There 
were ambassadors and ministers of state 
and members of parliament, and we had 
a marvelous service that lasted about 2 
1/2 hours, and none of us got tired of it 
at all. And as I sat there and as I par- 
ticipated in that, that dream took hold 
of me and I said to myself, "This thing 
is really going to happen. This dream is 
going to become a reality. " And today we 
want to share with you that dream and 
the fact that it is coming alive. We're 
happy to present to you the good news 
of Africa University. 

ROGER W. IRESON: Bishop 
Solomon, members of the General Con- 
ference, four years ago in St. Louis we 
had 1,500 acres and a dream. In 1992 in 
Louisville we can report to you that we 
have a staff of faculty teaching, build- 



ings, and 38 students who study as we 
speak. 

As general secretary of the Board of m- 
Higher Education and Ministry, it has 
been a thrill for me to go through this 
process of working with the government 
through the issues of the whether Africa 
wanted private universities because this 
was one of the first, establishing a 
charter that would guide our life and 
ensure that we were a quality institution 
and that the church would remain true 
to its commitments. That process has 
now become a model, and the govern- 
ment is telling the Seventh-Day Adven- 
tists and the Roman Catholic Church if 
they want to build a university to consult 
with the United Methodists because 
they have paved the way for Africa. In- 
ternational committees were gathered 
in various fields of expertise. They have 
worked very carefully to plan a quality 
curriculum, and this curriculum is now 
under way in 2 of the faculties: theology 
and agriculture. And it is a curriculum 
in an African context. Architectural 
plans are completed. The ground is 
being cleared, and the first buildings are 
going to begin to be erected. A careful 
financial plan, the unified plan, has now 
been organized. Agencies of this church 
have cooperated together. The Board of 
Global Ministries helped lay persons 
around this country in volunteer and 
mission teams transform 4 dilapidated 
farm buildings into beautiful classrooms 
and offices and the library, and that's 
where the students are right now. Facul- 
ty positions have been sponsored by 
various groups, including that board. 
The United Methodist Publishing 
House helped us establish a library, and 
over 20,000 books have now arrived in 
Zimbabwe as the first installation of 
that great place for study. United 
Methodist Communications has helped 
us to tell the story. And, of course, the 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry 
has worked tirelessly to try to help this 
project come into being. A vast network 
of conference support is now in place 
across this coimtry so that Africa 
University wiU be sustained. It is one of 
the most, if not the most, significant 
projects of The United Methodist 
Church in the 20th century that will 
impact the next. We intend in 1996, in 
Denver, to report to you that 4 faculties 4 
are in place; that the first phase of build- 
ings of 2 residence halls, a teaching 
building, a library, and possibly a chapel 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



183 



have been erected and dedicated by the 
bishops; and then, at the General Con- 
ference of the year 2000, that 7 faculties 
have been completed and that the entire 
project-between $80 million and $100 
million-has been supported to the level 
of $60 million by dedicated church 
people United Methodist around the 
world. John Kurewa, who has just left 
because he had to return to Africa to 
guide the university, said on Monday to 
the General Council on Finance, that 
when he first met the students, they 
broke into spontaneous song; in 
English, Portuguese, and French, "God 
Bless Africa University, Praise God for 
Africa University." So say we all. I hoped 
that you have picked up this bound copy 
of the Africa University report that has 
every bit of information in it and all of 
our projections including the architec- 
tural plans. It was available when you 
registered; it is also now outside of 
Cokesbury, I am told. We hope that you 
will take one home, so that you will be 
able to use it, and we now have for you 
a film, that is, a new film. And in it have 
been placed some of the latest pictures 
of the new buildings of Africa Univer- 
sity. 

(film) 

ANGELLA CURRENT: Bishop 
Solomon, conference delegates, and 
members, my name is Angella Current. 
I'm on the staff at the Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry office of loans 
and scholarships. The 1988 General 
Conference established the Africa 
University scholarship endowment 
fund. World Service Special Gift no. 
030188, to assist students in need of 
financial aid enrolled at the Africa 
University in fulfilling their dreams. 
With the professional support of the 
General Board of Global Ministries Of- 
fice of Finance and Field Service, the 
National Executive Campaign Commit- 
tee, chaired by Bishop Roy C. Nichols, 
and that nationally renowned Houston 
Oilers quarterback Warren Moon, we 
launched the $10 million scholarship 
endowment fund campaign in May of 
1991. Thousands of United Methodists 
across the world have caught the vision, 
many donating $10-$50 each week, 
some contributing $10,000 and more in 
memory of family members, and others 
making significant pledges. As of April 
30, in addition to the $7 million in ap- 
portioned funds and grants, over $3.1 



million in cash and pledges has been 
received for scholarships. School has 
started, and scholarship funds are now 
needed. With the help of our 165 volun- 
teer networkers and approval of this 
General Conference, we can continue 
the campaign and build a permanent 
endowment fund for today's and future 
students of the Africa University. 

BISHOP EMILIO De CARVALHO: 
My name is Emilio De Carvalho, and I 
am the chancellor of Africa University. 
What would Africa University mean for 
the present and for the future of Africa? 
Thus far, your 1988 mandate has been 
effectively fulfilled, by the estab- 
lishment of Africa University. Africa 
rejoices at this great event because for 
now on it holds in its bosoni the first 
United Methodist-related institution of 
higher learning. The 163-year-old 
dream for Africa United Methodism has 
become a reality on Jan. 24, 1992. What 
will Africa University mean for the 
present and for the future of Africa? It 
will mean 3 things. First of all, it will 
mean that the climax of the educational 
engagement of United Methodism 
across the world. Secondly, it will mean 
that Old Mutare is now the center to 
which its African young men and 
women will converge from now on to kill 
this hunger, this thirst for higher educa- 
tion. Thirdly, it will mean that the focus 
of our church will now turn to Africa 
University at this proper time-to nur- 
ture Africa University, to support Africa 
University, and to make it a first-class 
university. African United Methodist 
delegates present at this conference are 
here to thank The United Methodist 
Church on behalf of our continent of 
Africa. This is a great challenge before 
us. Thank you. 

YEMBA KEKUMBA (West Zaire): 
Bishops, General Conference delegates, 
my name is Yemba. I am the dean of the 
faculty of theology of the Africa Univer- 
sity. And I'm here in the capacity of the 
clergy delegate from the Western Zaire 
Annual Conference. The Africa Univer- 
sity is now a dream come concrete 
reality. The board of directors has been 
elected; the charter granted to give a 
legal and official existence to the institu- 
tion; the existing buildings on the cam- 
pus completely renovated to be used as 
classrooms, offices, and library. The 
academic and the non-academic staff 
were hired, while [audio tape is not 
dear] the students admitted, and classes 



began on 23rd of March this year. That 
means that we'll say that the com- 
munity of learning, committed to the 
excellence in teaching, and the research 
is already there. Two faculties or col- 
leges are open to their students this 
year: namely, the faculty of theology, 
with 14 students; and the faculty of 
agriculture and natural resources, with 
26 students. The 14 students came from 
Angola, Burundi, Mozambique, and 
Zimbabwe. They, this group of students 
that we call Alpha class, includes 9 
women and 31 young men. Nine 
academic staff are appointed, 5 in theol- 
ogy, 2 in agriculture and natural resour- 
ces, and 2 in content subjects serving 
both faculties. Among the 9 academic 
staff, 3 are women. Bishop and the 
General Conference delegates, let me 
take this opportunity, this special, op- 
portunity to express on behalf of the 
Africa University community our deep 
gratitude to the United Methodists 
throughout the world, and all men and 
women of good will, for their all kinds of 
committed and dedicated human and 
material resources to the Africa Univer- 
sity. The Africa University is an instru- 
ment that The United Methodist 
Church as a denomination is using in 
the years, decades, and why not cen- 
turies to come, to help African nations 
to achieve their educational goals and 
objectives. It is also an instrument, an 
opportunity, to give to the young 
Africans to fulfill their dream for educa- 
tion. We ask that the delegates of this 
1992 General Conference to extend this 
expression of our thanks to the local 
churches, church agencies, and annual 
conferences for their conmiitment to 
the Africa University. Thank yoa 

BISHOP ROY NICHOLS: Bishop 
Solomon and members of the annual 
conference and all of the friends that are 
gathered, something is happening here 
that I don't think we have taken account 
of. This General Conference is being 
transformed into a mission conference. 
Aren't you glad? I think it started when 
the bishops released Bishop May to 
begin that mission in Washington, D.C. 
We are launching at this General Con- 
ference, through the initiative of the 
bishops in cooperation with the Board 
of Global Ministries and other agencies 
of our church, a special thrust in mission 
evangelism and local congregation 
development in Eastern Europe and in 
the Commonwealth of Independent 



184 



May 8, 1992 



States which we once called the Soviet 
Union. Aren't you glad? 

We have been stimulated by the 
episode in Los Angeles regarding Rod- 
ney King, the injustice or the misap- 
propriation of justice in Simi Valley, and 
the ugly aftermath of violence and anger 
has churned this General Conference 
into the notion that we have a primary 
mission to our people right here for their 
salvation and redemption in the United 
States of America. If you believe that, 
then say "amen." 

AUDIENCE: Amen. 

BISHOP NICHOLS: Then we are now 
taking this significant giant step in the 
launching of Africa University, which 
has already become a reality. Building a 
university takes time, it takes money, 
and it takes wise and dedicated leader- 
ship, and God has given us all of these 
things to make this dream come true. I 
think it started with the initiative of the 
African bishops and with the gift of 
1,500 acres of land by the Zimbabwe 
Annual Conference, under the leader- 
ship of Bishop Abel Muzorewa. And 
then the General Conference gave us 2 
channels through which we could fund 
this effort, and it will take 10-12 years 
before it begins to come into its full 
flowering. Some of us may be sleeping 
when this university really begins to 
bloom and come into its own, but some- 
where we'll be looking joyfully at that 
university and its teeming students be- 
cause God has given us the privilege of 
helping to plant the seed. You are a 
founding General Conference. Aren't 
you glad? What can we do? Insist that 
every local church in Methodism pay 
their apportionments in full, for we can- 
not go forward without the amount- 
that $10 million per quadrennium-that 
must come through the channel of ap- 
portionments. Secondly, encourage 
local churches and annual conferences 
to go the second mile and to raise special 
funds for this scholarship endowment 
fund. Without it the expectancy of stu- 
dents coming from all over Africa can- 
not come true, for they will need 
assistance, and this $10 million scholar- 
ship fund that we are raising will help to 
do that job. Thirdly, help us to locate big, 
medium-size, and small givers to the 
Africa University scholarship endow- 
ment fund. And fourthly, you can join 
with the bishops who are almost 100% 
in their individual pledging to the 
scholarship endowment fund. You 



members of this General Conference 
and all of the friends that are stretched 
out here yonder, you can make your 
individual and personsd pledge to the 
scholarship endowment fund. Write this 
phone number down if you will, write 
this phone number down if you wUl, 
(615) 320-7755. If you want to pledge to 
Africa University, call that number. 
That's our office in Nashville. Reverse 
the charges, and we'll service you so that 
you can be one of us in helping in a 
significant way this scholarship fund. 
And fifth, wear your / Support Africa 
University button. If you don't have one, 
I think we can provide you with one 
before you leave this General Con- 
ference. I'm wearing one, and what a 
beautiful sight it would be if everyone in 
this General Conference would be wear- 
ing one. Don't you think that's a good 
idea? And now I would like every person 
who is associated in any way on commit- 
tees, the network, and the jurisdictions, 
special efforts associated with this effort 
of building Africa University, to stand. 
You know who you are. All over the 
house, up here; bishops, all of you should 
stand? Yes. Now wUl you remain stand- 
ing. This is just a part of the crop which 
expresses the enthusiasm of our people. 
If the lay people of our church are in- 
formed about what we are doing here, I 
can pledge to you on the basis of my 
work as a pastor, that when they dis- 
cover that this church is involved in 
major mission, their giving response to 
everything in your budget will increase. 
And now I raise my left hand and call 
forth the coming of the Africa Univer- 
sity future in the presence of my col- 
leagues who are gathered at the back of 
the room. WUl you come singing now? 

(song) Continental anthem of Africa is 
sung by persons from Africa 

BISHOP SOLOMON: My sisters and 
brothers, this wUl be recorded as one of 
the high moments of this General Con- 
ference. We praise God. We rejoice in 
the accomplishments thus achieved, 
and we anticipate the work that God 
shall continue to do, as we United 
Methodists, from many lands and many 
conferences, in solidarity with our 
sisters and brothers in Africa, continue 
this good work which God has begim 
among us. Thanks be to God. 

And all the people said, "Hallelujah." 
Oh, I think we can do better than that. 



4 



"Halleliyah!" Well, now, let's tiy it on 
cue. 

AUDIENCE: Halleliyah! 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Amen. And 
thanks be to God. All right. Yes. Will you 
please go to microphone 7? Will you 
state your name and your conference? 

LAURIE MOTZ (California-Nevada): 
Laurie Motz, California-Nevada. Point 
of personal privilege. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Yes. 

LAURIE MOTZ: Four years ago At- 
water United Methodist Church was the 
first church, we believe, in the United 
States to pay its fjiir share of money to 
support Africa University. And I have 
with me today, a check from our church, 
Atwater United Methodist Church in 
California, for the amoimt of $359 to pay 
our fair share and to be the first to do 
that. So I would like to chaUenge other 
churches in this General Conference to 
do the same. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Amen. We hear 
your challenge, and we shall seek to be 
faithful in response to it. We shall move 
to items that are on our agenda, Jind we 
will be turning now to the Agenda Com- 
mittee. The Courtesies Committee will 
not be reporting this morning, so will 
you move on your published agenda to 
the Committee on Agenda, and I recog- 
nize Don Ott. 

DON OTT (Wisconsm): Members of 
the conference, we are now weU into our 
consideration of petitions in your legis- 
lative committees; and as you know and 
see on the printed agenda, you have a 
full day today-beginning in just a few 
minutes-to do that. It's time about now 
in the conference to do a resdity check in 
our minds and remember that with the 
adoption of anew pattern of ourlivesfor 
this week and next, we lose track of days 
and times. So I woiUd remind you that 
this is Thursday. It is Thursday in week 
one. It is May 7th. Now with that rejJity, 
let me encourage you to work dUigently 
in your legislative committees and sub- 
committees. Charles Jordan is the chair 
of the Calendar Committee. The Calen- 
dar Committee is represented in his per- 
son on the Agenda Committee. We'll be 
working on your behalf to coordinate 
matters and bring calendar items as 
soon as possible. We're informed by 
Calendar Committee chair that we 
probably will not have calendar items to i 
deal with in plenary here untU Saturday V;' 
morning. So I would remind you of the 
printed agenda for the balance of today 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 4 



185 



and to announce the agenda for tomor- 
row: at 8:30 &.m., again a 30-niinute time 
for worship; at 9, a 15-minute time for 
nominations. Those that are printed al- 
ready in your DCA, pp. 84-86, will be 
considered. Among them: University 
Senate, General Council on Finance and 
Administration, Judicial Council, and 
others. A time tomorrow then, nomina- 
tions only, not elections. Then at 9:15 
tomorrow, courtesies if requested; 9:20, 
agenda, presiding officer an- 
nouncements, and ac^ournment to legis- 
lative committees at 9:30 tomorrow 
morning for the balance of the day. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right, our 
agenda has been outlined for us. We 
move in accordance. Yes, will you go to 
microphone 8, please? And state your 
name and your conference. 

BOB WATERS (Texas): My name is 
Bob Waters. I am from the Texas Con- 
ference. Bishop, I, Ln behalf of the 
delegation, have a motion intended to 
influence our agenda. Will that motion 
be in order at this time? 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Well, the mo- 
tion is in order. I would remind us that, 
according to our rules, requests for agen- 
da items are to be referred to the Agenda 
Committee. However, if the body so 
chose by 2/3 vote, those rules could be 
suspended. I'll leave it to you to make 
your motion. 

WATERS: Then I should move the 
suspension of the rule in order to con- 
sider the establishing of the order of the 
day. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right, the 
motion is before us. Is it seconded? And 
it is seconded. I would think that we are 
ready to proceed to vote. Will you vote 
when the light appears? Yes, the rules 
are suspended, and you may proceed. 

WATERS: I thank my colleagues for 
the privilege. In behalf of the Texas Con- 
ference delegation, I move that on next 
Monday, May 11, at 10 a.m., this as- 
sembly shall consider all petitions and 
proposals related to the issue of 
homosexuality to be followed immedi- 
ately by the consideration of all peti- 
tions and proposals surrounding the 
issue of abortion. Given a second, I 
should like to speak to it. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Is there a 
second? Yes, it is seconded. You may 
speak. 

WATERS: On Tuesday morning of 
this week, before the first session of this 
General Conference had convened, a 



local paper headlined its view of our 
assembly by announcing: Methodists to 
Discuss Homosexuality and Abortion. 
To the degree that the media in this 
country offers coverage of our proceed- 
ings, the first focus is likely to center on 
these 2 issues. Our delegation is con- 
vinced that this conference will be well 
served by the earliest consideration of 
both issues since they are serious, dif- 
ficult, and urgent~not only to us, but 
also to the millions of United 
Methodists for whom and/or to whom 
we shall speak on many issues. We have 
numerous other substantive and dif- 
ficult matters to handle. And to make 
early decisions on the issues of 
homosexuality and abortion is to say to 
all who will listen, that we have a broad 
and diverse agenda centering on much 
more than the 2 big issues which stress 
us deeply in mind and emotion. We urge 
this body to establish this order of the 
day for next Monday, 10 a.m. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right. I 
think, yes, will you go to microphone 10, 
please, and state your name and your 
conference. 

LAWSON (California-Pacific): 

Bishop, I want to oppose this motion. I 
think we should not allow the media to 
determine what are the crucial issues 
before this General Conference. To 
bring a proposal . . . 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right now, 
sisters and brothers, let me interrupt 
Brother Lawson just a moment. This is 
the family of God at work. We're not 
trying to win or to lose, we're trying to 
discern together the will of God. And I 
trust that we will refrain from applause 
in order that we may build one another 
up in love and hold one another up in 
prayer. You may proceed. Brother Law- 
son. 

LAWSON: I would simply repeat I 
think it's a shame for us to consider 
agendiis put forward by the media. I do 
not believe in any sense of the word that 
homosexuality or abortion are the criti- 
cal issues for the mission of the church 
today. Fourteen million children die 
around the world as we gather here. We 
have White, Black, blue, green, yellow 
people all across our nation, all across 
the globe, who are hungry, who suffer 
from the principalities and powers that 
would destroy life. We, the church, are 
supposed to be about the business of 
proclaiming life in God, in Christ Jesus, 
in the Kingdom. And for this General 



Conference to be stampeded into the 
notion that the critical issues are abor- 
tion or homosexuality says more about 
us than it says either about Jesus or the 
gospel, or it says about the Kingdom. 
And I oppose the motion because I think 
we should permit those resolutions that 
come on as legislative committees are 
able to do the work and release them. 
And if it meiins, therefore, that we have 
to work until 1 a.m. Friday night or 
Saturday morning the 16th, so be it. But 
let's determine the agenda on some 
other basis. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right, 
you've had a speech for and a speech 
against. Yes, I recognize the delegate 
that's seated to my left at the rear. Will 
you go to microphone 12, please? And 
state your name and conference. 

DAVID QUEE (Sierra Leone): I arise 
to oppose the motion on the grounds 
that the speaker has not given us sub- 
stantial reasons for wemting to change 
the order of the day. We have more 
important issues to be discussed. Surely 
the criteria used for determining the 
issue of homosexuality and abortion 
may not be as important as all of the 
day's tasks. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right, thank 
you, that is a speech for. Is anyone wish- 
ing to speak otherwise? I'm sorry, 
speech against. All right, I think we are 
ready to vote. Yes? I'm sorry. Yes, will 
you please go to microphone 5 and state 
your name and conference? 

JOE KILPATRICK (North Georgia): 
Bishop, my name is Joe Kilpatrick from 
the North Georgia Conference. I'm a 
layperson. I wish to speak in favor of the 
motion. I think this is a workable 
proposal. I don't think that it is set be- 
cause of the media. I think it is set be- 
cause of the interest of this body in 
surveys made by The United Methodist 
Reporter. This homosexuality issue 
rated no. 1 across the jurisdictions of our 
conference, of our church. I think that 
the abortion issue is linked in the minds 
of many with sexuality attitudes and 
actions, and I do not think that we need 
to delay the debate on these until the 
wee hours, when time is limited for vital 
expression by the members of this body. 
I urge the support of the motion. Thank 
you. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right. Yes. 
You may go to microphone 4. 



186 



May 8, 1992 



THOMAS MURPHY (Virginia): Tom 
Murphy of Virginia Conference. I call 
the question. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Well, I think we 
will hold to our order of 3 speeches for 
and against. But since we are ready to 
vote . . . yes? The Waters motion before 
us is to establish an order of the day for 
10 a.m. on Monday. It wUl take a 2/3 
vote of the body to establish such an 
order. WUl you please vote when the 
light appears. (427 yes, 521 no, 7 absten- 
tions). It is not approved. We shall 
proceed now with our agenda items. I 
want to call on Allen Norris for the 
Committee on Presiding Officers. 

ALLEN NORRIS (North Carolina): 
Bishop Solomon and members of the 
General Conference, the Committee on 
Presiding OfTicers is pleased to an- 
nounce that the presiding bishop for 
Friday morning's session will be Bishop 
Elias Galvan of the Phoenix area. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Thank you very 
much. Yes, will you go please to 
microphone 2? State your name and 
conference. 

CHARLES PEARCE (Florida): 
bishop. I have a motion requesting in- 
formation so that we General Con- 
ference delegates can be better 
informed. May I give the motion, please, 
sir? 

BISHOP SOLOMON: You may. 

PEARCE: I move that this General 
Conference, excuse me, I move that the 
general secretaries of all of our general 
boards and agencies submit to this 1992 
General Conference their cost-reduc- 
tion programs with the estimated dol- 
lars saved for the past quadrennium. I 
also request a list of their planned cost- 
reduction programs for this coming 
quadrennium. Further, it is requested 
that this data be distributed to the 
General Conference delegates no later 
than the morning session of May 9, 
1992, sir. If I could have a second, I could 
speak to it. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Is there a 
second? Yes, it is seconded. You may 
speak. 

PEARCE: Our Florida Annual Con- 
ference is the only one that I know any- 
thing about, particularly. But we have 
had to have staff reductions at our con- 
ference level. We ran out of money so 
that we had to have our only special 
called session in 20 years in February. In 
the Miami area, for instance, we have 
many, many people out of work, and we 



would like to know what our general, the 
people of~the local grass roots people of 
our annual conference-would like to 
know what is being done on the general 
boards and agencies to reduce costs. In 
the Advance DCA, the general secretary 
of Church and Society, if you would take 
on the first page, has instituted reforms 
and streamlined his agency so that it can 
be more efficient. And I applaud him 
and his agency for what he and his group 
have done. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right. 

PEARCE: Thank you. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Thank you. 
The matter is properly before us. And I 
sense you as a body are ready to vote. 
This is a motion of direction for general 
secretaries in terms of cost reduction 
achieved and cost reduction plans in mo- 
tion. WUl you vote when the light ap- 
pears? (570 yes, 343 no, 18 abstentions). 
The motion is sustained. We'U proceed 
now to hear announcements from the 
Secretary of the General Conference, 
Carolyn Marshall. I'm sorry, to my right, 
yes? All right, wUl you go to microphone 
10, and state your name and conference, 
please? 

TERRY GREGORY (North Arkan- 
sas): Point of information, please. I 
think it would be helpful for me, and 
may be helpful for the body of General 
Conference, to know how many staff 
people we have here from the general 
agencies: what, how much, from where 
does their support come, and what is 
their per diem. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: WeU, your in- 
quiry is appropriate, but unless there is 
a motion, we as a body wUl need to 
proceed on with our agenda. 

GREGORY: Then I so move. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right. Is 
there a second? It is seconded. Do you 
wish to speak further to it? 

GREGORY: I've heard a lot of ques- 
tions since I've been here about the 
money being spent from the general 
agencies, and I just think it would be 
helpful to us to know how much is spent 
on staff coming to General Conference. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: All right. I do 
not see other persons wishing to speak 
on this motion. It is properly before us. 
WUl you please vote when the light ap- 
pears. (541 yes, 378 no, 11 abstentions). 
The motion is approved. I am inviting 
your suggestions since you made the mo- 
tion, if you have enabling motions by 
which you want to get this before the 



body. Or will you leave this to the 
General Secretaries simply to provide ^ 
the data through the DCA"! Would that 9 
be acceptable? 

GREGORY: That is acceptable. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Thankyou veiy 
much. We continue on our agenda as we 
turn to the secretary of the General Con- 
ference, Carolyn Marshall, who shall 
lead us in appropriate announcements. 

CAROLYN MARSHALL: Some 
several announcements appear on pp. 
122-123 of the daUy DCA. Two to lift for 
our particiUar information. One in 
recognition of the General Conference 
fast in effect through Friday morning. 
The niff School of Theology breakfast 
has been changed from Friday to Satur- 
day. Breakfast will start at 7 a.m. in the 
Keeneland Suite, mezzanine level, Hyatt 
Regency. And secondly, this will be par- 
ticularly applicable to those persons 
who are not delegates, but who are in 
attendance here at General Conference. 
Worship services are planned each after- 
noon at 2:30, Trinity United Methodist 
Church, located three blocks south of 
the Convention Center. You're urged to 
make those services a part of your daUy 
experience here. For your information. 
Rev. J. Jeannette Cooper is the preacher 
this afternoon. 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Thankyou very 
much. By action of this body, we have 
proclaimed a time of prayer and fasting. 
Today, by action of the Congress of the 
United States, is also designated as a 
national day of prayer. When John Wes- 
ley listed the chief means of grace, he 
always began the list with prayer, the 
Scriptures, and Holy Communion. 
WhUe it is important for us to be 
reminded in a disciplined fashion of our 
commitment to be a praying people, let 
us surely affirm for ourselves that's who 
we are and who we want to be everyday 
of our life. Prior to our adjournment to 
legislative committees, I am going to ask 
Bishop Ernest T. Dixon to come and 
lead us in our prayer of sending forth. 
Bishop Dixon. 

BISHOP ERNEST T. DKON: Let us 
pray. 

Qyrayer) 

BISHOP SOLOMON: Amen. You are 
adjourned to legislative committees. ^, 



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notice can turn to this 
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includes enriching services on Christ : The 
Way; How Much are You Worth?; 
Tragedy and the Will of God; Making 
Miracles, and Compassion Burnout. AOl- 
10517X. $9.95, paper. 



Georgia Harkness: 

For Such a Time as This 

The Life, Work and Thought of Georgia 

Harkness 

By Rosemary Skinner Keller 
Arguably the first woman theologian in 
America, Georgia Harkness was the first 
wiiman to teach in a mainline Protestant 
.seminary in the United States. In this vivid 
biography, this outspoken and distinguished 
scholar is brought to life. AOl -132762. 
$29.95, hardcover. 

Can Homophobia Be Cured? 

Wrestling with Questions That Challenge 

the Church 

By Bruce Hilton 

This study is perfect tor people who aren't 
satisfied with easy answers to the questions 
Christians raise about homosexuality. Bruce 
Hilton uses a question-and-answer format to 
deal with issues facing the church. 
AOl-046319. $10.95, paper. 

PuWis/ied \tj Abingtion Vress 
hvo\\oh\& M 

©Cokesbury 
Books • Bibles • Church Resources ' 



Visit Cokesbury 

at Qeneral Conference 

Street Level near Food Services 

Exhibit Area C 



S^ 



OA-02732 



^ 




Cokesbury 

Books + Bibles -l- Church Supplies 



INVITES YOU TO MEET: 
Zan Holmes 

Author of: 

Encountering Jesus 

Autographing books 

Friday, May 8 

12:30 ■ 1:00 

Bruce Hilton 

Author of: 

Can Homophobia Be Cured? 

and 

First Do No Harm 

Autographing books 

Friday, May 8 

2:00 • 2:30 

Artemio R. Guillermo 

Author of: 

Churches Aflame 

Autographing books 

Friday, May 8 

3:00 - 3:30 




*< .»'* 



L 



All signings held in the 
Cokesbury Display 



t♦*^ "^o- 







Daily Report 



Daily Christian Advocate 

THE GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Saturday, May 9th, 1992 



Vol.4 No. 5 



Delegates Tackle Petitions, Prepare for Debate 



Legislative committees of the 200th anniversary 
United Methodist General Conference plowed steadily 
through piles of petitions Friday, and delegates pre- 
pared to begin plenary debate Saturday morning on cal- 
endar items. 

By late Friday committee work had been completed 
on a number of major issues, including a new worship 
book, the homosexuality study, general church appor- 
tionments, location of the General Board of Global Min- 
istries, and proposals for ministry with Hispanics and 
Native Americans. Minority reports were being readied 
on some topics. 

Friday morning the Financial Administration Legis- 
lative Committee on a vote of 5140 approved the rec- 
ommendation of the General Board of Global Ministries 
relocation study committee that the church's missions 
agency be moved from New York City to a city yet to be 
chosen. This action is contrary to the vote of the Gen- 
eral and Judicial Administration Legislative Commit- 
tee, which sided with the General Council on Ministries 
and the General Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion, who asked that all general agency headquarters 
be retained in their current locations through the next 
quadrennium. 

Friday afternoon the Discipleship Committee com- 
pleted its work on the proposed new book of worship 



and rituals for the denomination that counts almost 10 
million members worldwide. The volume, designed pri- 
marily for pastors and others who plan and lead wor- 
ship, will supplement the United Methodist Hymnal. 

Scheduled for action Saturday morning are propos- 
als on Hispanics; older adult, prison, and deaf minis- 
tries; and the quadrennial theme. Other issues will be 
considered as time permits before the scheduled 12:30 
p.m. acUoximment. 

On Friday evening many delegates completed a 24- 
hour fast in response to the events in Los Angeles and 
nationwide. Money saved was to be contributed to the 
United Methodist Committee on Relief. 

Sunday, the 998 delegates will take a break from 
their labors to attend worship services in the Louisville 
region. Some of the delegates and other conference par- 
ticipants will occupy pulpits. 

Sunday afternoon and evening, the Louisville Con- 
ference will present two performances of a musical cele- 
bration, "Lost in Wonder, Love, and Praise." A 
300-voice choir and orchestra will be featured, along 
with the widely acclaimed Junaluska Singers. The cele- 
bration will take place at 4 and 7 p.m. in the Macauley 
Theatre at Fourth and Broadway in Louisville. 

— Robert Lear 





Agenda 




Saturday, May 9 


8:30 a.m. 


Worship 


9.00 a.m. 


Conmiittee on Agenda 




Calendar Committee 




General Council on Ministries 




GCOM Calendar Items 


10:45 a.m. 


Other Calendar Items 




Committee on Agenda 




Committee on Presiding Officers 




Announcements 


12:30 p.m. 


Plenary Adjournment 


2:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 


7:30 p.m. 


Legislative Committees 



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JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 

"Please vote when the light appears." Charlene P. Kammerer 
(Florida) and James A. Harnish (Florida) will hear that refrain 
many times during this General Conference. 



194 



May 9, 1992 



Arizona Choir to Sing in Today's Worship Services 




Sixty-eight years old is the average age 
of members of the sanctuary choir from 
Shepherd of the Hills UMC, Sun City 
West, Arizona. The choir ^11 help lead 
worship at both worship services today. 



Daily Christian 
Advocate 



Editorial Offices - Room 116 

Commonwealth Convention Center 

Sales and Subscriptions - DCA Booth 

near Cokesbury Resource Center 

Staff 



J. Richard Peck Editor 

Sheila McGee Associate Editor 

Mike Cunningham Computer Manager/Calendar Editor 

and Coordinator of Legislative Section Secretaries 

Rebecca Burgoyne Assistant Coordinator of Legislative 

Section Secretaries 
Gayl Hinton.... Composition Manager for Calendar and Proceedings 

Richard Street Composition Manager for News and Features 

Mochell Hughes Office Manager 

Bob Lowdermilk Coordinator of Verbatim 

Transcribers & Checkers 

Brad Motta Features Editor 

Keith Kendall Roundup Editor 

Keith Pohl Coordinator of News Reports from Legislative 

Sections & News Editor 

George Dunn Manager of Audio Transcription 

Gilbert Elam Engineer 

Glenn Hinton Xywrite Trainer 

Thelma Boeder Index Editor 

Marvin Cropsey Chief Copy Editor 

Sally Sharps Copy Editor 

Mary Catherine Dean Copy Editor 

Vern Bigler Copy Editor 

Janet C. Lowdermilk Copy Editor 

Vern Denney Copy Editor 

Gwen Colvin Copy Editor 

Angela Butler Copy Editor 

Rochelle Blake Copy Editor 

Barbara Dunlap-Berg Features Editor and Copy Editor 

Bob Lear News Writer 

Camilla Jones Production Manager 

Juanita Bellenfant Sales Manaager 

Marge Poteete Sales Representative 

Barbara Acuff. Sales Representative 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Tom Tozer News Writer 

Tom Potter News Writer 



Singing in the 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. General Con- 
ference worship services today is the sanctuary choir of 
the Shepherd of the Hills United Methodist Church, 
Sun City West, AZ. They will present pre-service con- 
certs for both services at 8:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. The af- 
ternoon service will be at Trinity United Methodist 
Church. John Dorch is director. 

The choir began when the church was founded in a 
new retirement community in 1980. Five singers and 
an accompanist on a small electronic organ provided 
musical leadership in the early days. The congregation 
met in the community's social hall. As the chuj-ch grew, 
the choir rehearsed in a nearby funeral home chapel. 

Early in 1984, 350 church members raised enough 
money to begin construction of a building which was 
opened in 1985. Although the sanctuary was built to ac- 
commodate 600 persons, two Sunday services are now 
needed to seat worshipers during the peak winter 
months. The choir sings for both morning services. 

Some interesting statistics about the choir are: 

* average age is 68 years; 

* average years of choir experience is 44 years; 

* members have come from 23 different states and 
have lived in Sun City West an average of 5 years; 

* musicians have retired from 28 different profes- 
sions. The choir includes 8 professional musicians; 

* five of the original choir members still sing in the 
choir. 

We welcome this unusual and outstanding group of 
singers! 

Preaching in the 8:30 a.m. service today is Bishop 
Ruediger Minor of the Dresden Germany Area. Litur- 
gist is Edward Puslecki of Warsaw, Poland. Puslecki is 
the general superintendent of United Methodist work 
in Poland. 

The Rev. Kirbyjon Caldwell, senior pastor of Wind- 
sor Village United Methodist Church, Houston, TX, 
preaches at 2:30 p.m. W.E. "Buddy" Arnold, North Lit- 
tle Rock, AR, Arkansas Conference lay leader, is litur- 
gist. 

Serving as organist for both services is Michael 
Wright of Louisville. Wright is organist/chofr master of 
Louisville's Fourth Avenue United Methodist Church. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



195 



Speaker Assignments to Local Churches 

Many guest speakers will be filling pulpits in area churches during 
General Conference. Following are the assignments as 
reported to or arranged by the Local Committee: 



Sunday May 10 



Bishops Location 



Heinrich BoUeter Crescent Hill 

Edward Ccirroll St. John (Louisville) 

Wayne Clymer Highland 

Emerson Colaw Parkview 

Paul Duffey Brandenburg 

R. Kern Eutsler Carrollton First 

Paul L.A. Granadosin Pleasant Grove (New Abany) 

C.W. Hancock Graefenburg 

J.Woodrow Heam Bethany 

Leroy C. Hodapp Evansville District 

L. Bevel Jones III Beechmont 

Walter F. Klaiber Advent 

J. Lloyd Knox Epworth 

Clay Lee Jr First (Corydon) 

William B. Lewis Elizabethtown Memorial 

Richard Looney Grant Line (New Albany) 

James K. Mathews Aldersgate 

Robert Morgan Fourth Avenue 

Abel T. Miizorewa Shively 

Emerito P. Nacpil Mount Washington 

John Alfred Ndoricimpa .... Oakdale 

Roy C. Nichols Virginia Avenue 

Roy Short Marcus Lindsey 

Forrest Stith R.E. Jones 

Mack B. Stokes Cooper Memorial 

Richard Wilke St. Matthews 

Joseph Yeakel Centenary (New Albany) 

Hans Vaexby Watkins Memorial 



Clergy Lx)catioii 

Roger Barr Crawford Consolidated 

Charles E. Barton Bethel (Meade County) 

David Brazelton Middletown 

Martin A. Case Old Capitol 

Thom White Wolf Fassett.. DePauw 

Ben H. Feemster Audubon Park 

James Ferree City Road Chapel 

S. Stephen Foster Hobbs Chapel 

Larry Goodpaster Christ (Georgetown) 

Aaron M. Gray Aliens Chapel 

Sharon Halderman Salem (Indiana) 

James Han First Korean (RadclifO 

Ezra Earl Jones Jeffersontown 

Edward A. Kail Bethel GBuUit County) 

Fritz Mutti Campbellsburg 

Perry Newbury Preston Highway 

Judith A. Olin Wesley Manor 

Marceliand A. Pascasio Jr. Kuttawa 

Edward Puslecki Immanuel 

Yvonne B. Trueblood Dennie Memorial 

J. Philip Wogaman Zion/Clifton Heights 

Edwin Zeiders Marengo Gndiana) 



Laity Location 

Sally Askew Cletrkson Circuit 

Jerry Brewster, Taylorsville 

Jerry Brewster Christ United Methodist 

Men (May 9) 

J.W. Holsinger Grace/Hazelwood 

Charles Holston Edwardsville (Ind.) 

Gus Gustafson Wesley Chapel (New Albany) 

Chuck Jones Parkway 

Betty Whitehurst Mount Holly 



In Churches That Have Made Arrangments 
Themselves 

Rinaldo Hernandez (translator) 

Centenary (Shelbyville) 

William Hinson Christ 

Evelyn Laycock St. Mark 

Ruth Ann Miller (alternate) 

Leitchfield 

William Quick Epiphany 

Bishop Robert H. Spain St. Paul 



196 



May 9, 1992 



The Church in the Midst of Turmoil 



Germany East 



Das kann dock nicht alles gewesen sein. 

"That cannot be all there is." So goes a ballad popu- 
lar in East Germany during the past generation. 

"This is the feeling of many people today," explained 
the Rev. Roland Roeseler, 59, superintendent of the 
Zwickau District and chairperson of the Germany East 
delegation. Thirty-four congregations of about 8,000 
United Methodists call the Zwickau District home. The 
district is in Saxony near the Bavarian and Czech bor- 
ders. 

"Something is missing in the lives of many persons, 
especially the young," Roeseler continued, "which the 
'things' of consumerism cannot fill." This vacuum in 
daily life evolves fi-om unrealized hopes for economic 
improvement, a lingering lack of trust, and the residue 
of state-supported atheism. Aggravated by high unem- 
ployment, this frustration — shared by many young peo- 
ple in eastern Germany — is reflected in growing 
violence and aimlessness, Roeseler added. 

But this situation in the former German Democratic 
Republic (GDR) offers the church an "important possi- 
bility to build a caring community and a sense of Chris- 
tian direction" in the lives of millions, Roeseler noted. 
Under Communism, United Methodists could speak 
fi-eely only within their congregations, he explained, 
and could not engage in public evangelistic and out- 
reach activities. Concerts, publications, public book ta- 
bles, and a variety of mission activities now provide 
new opportunities for congregational outreach. 

Roeseler said that about one-third of United Meth- 
odism's 120 ministers in the former GDR were involved 
in round-table conferences which brought Communist 
Party, community, and church leaders together during 
East Germany's 'TDloodless revolution" in 1989-90. 
What began as a peace movement grew into a fi-eedom 
movement, Roeseler noted. 

The people, who gathered in churches where they 
were fi-ee to express themselves, moved out to demon- 
strate with chants of "We are the people," a response to 
the government's insistence it was "of, for, and by the 
people." Encouraged by their progress, demonstrators 
changed the original chant as their movement unified, 
shouting, "We are one people!" 

The current four conferences in Germany submitted 
to this General Conference a joint petition calling for 
unification. 

Attracted to a Methodist youth movement in 1948, 
Roeseler realized four years later that he wanted to en- 
ter the ordained ministry. His experience of a call came 



during an annual conference session in the famous Tho- 
maskirche, Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach 
served as musical director. 

Today, Roeseler's son is also a minister. 



-Tom Potter 



Cuba 



His first word was "impactful" as Bishop Joel Ajo 
Fernandez of the Methodist Church in Cuba began de- 
scribing the daily life of the Methodist Church in Cuba. 
For 110 years the Methodists have been in Cuba. Dur- 
ing the past few years, more than 30,000 new members 
have helped to create 92 new congregations. 

"Oiu" church enables a person to act in daily life, 
Bishop Ajo said." We revolve around the rudimentary 
aspects of church life. There are worship times, pastoral 
duties, and the daily life of committed laity. 

"We have renewed hope in Jesus Christ and renewed 
commitment to the pattern of spirituality of John 
Wesley." 

The Methodist Church of Cuba has day-to-day con- 
tact with the Castro government, not as revolutionary 
Christians or as members of the Cormnunist Party, but 
as an alternative way of thinking. 

"There is mistrust," Bishop Ajo commented, 'TDut our 
spirituality is seen as integral balancing the internal 
and the social. The government understands that." 

Bishop Ajo said the Cuban Methodist Church is 
"trained to reach large nimibers of people." 

Soon the Methodists of Cuba hope to have a printing 
press and television programs, along with the ability to 
disseminate information to the populace. "We can 
transform society," Bishop Ajo said. 

"We are not a political group as are the human 
rights groups in Cuba, but Cubans committed to im- 
pacting change within our country. 

"We are an informed membership in dialogue with 
our government while doing nothing behind their 
backs." 

"We are the church of Jesus Christ," he concluded. 

—Billie R. Dalton 



Editor's note: "The Church in the Midst of Turmoil" is a 
series of profiles on conferences ministering in regions ex- 
periencing political unrest. 



( 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



197 



TV program focuses 
on response to AIDS 

Tune in United Methodist TV programming in your 
hotel room at 7-8 a.m. and 9-10 p.m. today. 

"Why We Care About AIDS" visits a small-town 
grandmother who finds strength and new under- 
standing about discrimination through her personal en- 
counter with AIDS. An urban pastor ministers to 
children traumatized by AIDS. And in the Midwest, a 
mother whose child has AIDS deals with her situation 
by reaching out to parents who have lost children to the 
disease. 

This program was produced jointly by the General 
Board of Global Ministries and United Methodist Com- 
munications. 



"Catch the Spirit" takes viewers to DeKalb, Texas, 
to witness the Jubilee Quartet and to Ortez, Colo., 
where an unusual man cares for a church that many 
people have forgotten. The show also features an ap- 
prentice program at Bethune-Cookman College in Flor- 
ida and congregations in New York City who worship 
separately but simultaneously in English, Spanish, Ko- 
rean, and Chinese languages. 

Included in this special hour-long program is a one- 
minute update of yesterday's General Conference ac- 
tion. 

Tune in to Channel 8 at the Brown Hotel; Channel 
6, Gait House/Gait House East and Holiday Inn Down- 
town; Channel 4, Hyatt; Channel 14, Seelbach; and 
check your Visitel channel at other hotels. 




Ufiing American Si^ 

IjangUBge, Paula and Tom 
WilliamB sign the proceedings 
in a plenary session. They are 
from Cameron UMC for the 
Deaf in Cincinnati, Ohio. 



RALPH BAKER PHOTO 



Tliree-month-old Lawson Williams will 
go for the record for attendance at 
consecutive General Conferences — in 
2072! Lawson is held by his dad, Larry 
Williams, who learned Portugese as a 
child in a missionary family in Brazil 
and who is serving as a translator 
here. The Williamses are from 
Ballwin, Mo. Bishop Joao Somane 
Machado (Mozambique) looks on. 



JOHN GOODWIN PHOTO 




198 



May 9, 1992 



Bishop Short Is Long on Service 



Bits 'n Pieces 



Bishop Roy Hunter Short of Hermitage, Term., says 
he is attending his 19th General Conference. Elected to 
the episcopacy in 1948, he may be the oldest bishop in 
attendance here — but Bishop Lloyd Christ Wicke was 
elected in the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) 
Church the week before Short became a bishop in The 
Methodist Church. Bishop Wicke has also been here for 
part of the time. 

This General Conference is a homecoming of sorts 
for Bishop Short, 90. A native son of Louisville, he grew 
up 11 blocks from the convention center. He is accompa- 
nied by his son, the Rev. Riley P. Short, a reserve 
clergy delegate from the Florida Conference. 

The 1939 uniting conference was Bishop Short's all- 
time favorite conference; he says, adding that he is the 
only bishop still alive who was present at that confer- 
ence and allowing that he was quite young then. 

Bishop Short may be retired, but he's still preach- 
ing. This Sunday will find him in the pulpit of Marcus 
Lindsey United Methodist Church, which is in the 
neighborhood where he grew up. He offered the opening 
prayer Tuesday night for the Episcopal Address. 

This reporter had a serendipitous meeting with 
Robert Thornbury, one of Bishop Short's classmates at 
the University of Louisville. Thornbury was pleased to 
learn that his friend Roy is still alive and at work. 
Thornbury, a Roman Catholic layman, remembers his 
classmate as a dashing fellow with the "gift of gab." He 
was not at all surprised to learn that his former class- 
mate became a United Methodist bishop. 

That "gift of gab" must have grown into the gift of 
preaching. Bishop Short is remembered for delivering 
the good news with power and passion. Upon learning 
that Bishop Short will preach this Sunday, one of his 
former parishioners urged me to hear for myself this 
dynamic preacher and leader. 

— Patricia Ann Meyers 




RALPH BARER PHOTO 

Bishop Roy Short offers the opening prayer for The Episcopal 
Address on Tuesday night. 



These items are in the "Did you know" department. 
If you have interesting tidbits to share about dele- 
gates or doings, please jot them down and bring 
them to Barbara Dunlap-Berg at the DCA office on 
the lower level of the convention center. 

Three members of the Euper fami ly of Saginaw, 
Mich., are General Conference delegates from the 
Detroit Conference. Jacqueline K. Euper and the 
Rev. Terry A. Euper (reserve) are the parents of 
Stephen T. Euper. 

Two legislative committee vice chairs are candidates 
for the episcopacy. They are the Rev. Ann B. Sherer, 
Texas Conference, and the Rev. Alfred L. Norris, 
Louisiana Conference. The Rev. Vance Summers Jr. 
was listed in yesterday's edition as a vice chair; he is 
a chair. We apologize. 

Five committee chairs are women, representing four 
jurisdictions. The 36 committee chairs, vice chairs, 
and secretaries (three officers in each of 12 commit- 
tees) are comprised of 17 women and 19 men; 20 aree 
clergy and 16 are laity. Two of the 36 committee of- 
ficers are from the Northeastern Jurisdiction, seven 
from the North Central Jurisdiction; 10 from the 
Southeastern Jurisdiction; 10 from the South Cen- 
tral Jurisdiction; five from the Western Jurisdiction; 
and two officers are from the Central Conferences. 

Congratulations to Faith and Missions Committee. 
Members smartly combined what may be a record 64 
petitions into a single calendar item. The 96-mem- 
ber group debated two petitions related to homosexu- 
ality and refined them. Then they wisely combined 
most of the remaining petitions into a single item. 

Since becoming the first Hispanic bishop in North 
American Methodism in 1988, Bishop Elias Galvan 
has been honored often. But his previous honors 
hadn't prepared him for what happened as he pre- 
sided over the Friday morning session. David Quee, 
an attorney from Sierra Leone, was being nominated 
to the Judicial Council. Bishop Galvan asked if the 
nomination was in regard to the Judicial Council. 
"Yes, my lord," replied the Rev. Joseph Renner, also 
of Sierra Leone. After the laughter, Bishop Galvan 
responded, with evident humility, "Muchas gracias." 

In 1981, a Catholic priest began working with weav- 
ers in Guatemala, helping them to earn extra in- 
come by creating beautiful stoles. Each stole 
typically takes 27 hours to make. Often at United 
Methodist gatherings the stoles are sold. Look for 
Jack Collins of Murphysboro, 111., "the man in the 
burgundy Guatemalan vest." He is carrying a black 
bag fiUed with stoles. Proceeds from the stole sales 
help provide tuition, uniforms, and tutoring to chil- 
dren at Hogar del Ninos, an orphanage supported by 
the Advance in Santa Cruz del Quiche, Guatemala. 



DaUy Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



199 



Announcements 



Delegates are invited to learn more about health and 
human services provided by the members of the 
United Methodist Association of Health and Welfare 
Ministries. Visit UMA's information room, #358 in the 
Gait House East from 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. 
••* 

Officers were elected by the Writing Committee for the 
"Message to the United States." Chairperson, R. 
Randy Day, Secretary, Anna Rhee. The committee has 
begun its writing. It plans to send the message to the 
President, all senators, all members of the House of 
Representatives, and mayors of large cities, among 
others. 

Saturday, May 9 

People in 12-step recovery programs are invited to 
attend a discussion meeting from 8 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., 
Com Island Room, Gait House, May 9 thru 15. 
•** 

Bering Memorial UMC, a reconciling congregation in 
Houston, will present "AIDS and other Healing 
Ministries," a luncheon forum about their pioneering 
work in AIDS ministries, Saturday, May 9, Days Inn, 
Suite 615. A $5 lunch will be available. 
*** 

The Committee of 100 and other supporters will meet 
briefly at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday in the south bleacher 
area of the convention auditorium (next to area of 
translation booths). 

*** 

All Conference Council Directors are invited to the 
home of Rhoda Peters, Director of the LouisviUe 
Conference COM, for dinner on Saturday, May 9 at 
6:30 p.m. Vans will leave the Gait House at 6 p.m. 
*** 

The Genetic Science Task Force will sponsor a session 
discussing its report on Saturday, May 9, 1 p.m., room 
106, convention center. 

**• 

Anyone under 25. . . Whether you are a delegate, 
visitor, or reserve, please meet at the back northwest 
comer of the plenary room at 12:45 p.m. on May 9. We 
need you! Deborah M. Wilcock, Eastern, Pa. 

Sunday, May 10 

Members of the Northeastern Jurisdiction of Black 
Methodists for Church Renewal and other interested 



persons are invited to meet episcopal candidates, 
Sunday, May 10 from 8 p.m. - 11 p.m.. Gait House 
East, Kingshead Room. Contact Anne Williams, 
Brown Hotel to schedule an appointment. 

National Black Methodists for Church Renewal, Inc., 
dinner will be held Sunday, May 10, 4:00 p.m. at R,E. 
Jones UMC. Donation - $10. Contact Joseph Roberson 
or Betty Henderson for reservations. Transportation 
available at the Jefferson Street entrance from 3 p.m. - 
3:45 p.m. 

Monday, May 11 

The General Board of Global Ministries will sponsor 
an issues briefing on Monday, May 11, 12:30 p.m. to 2 
p.m., Hyatt Regency South Ballroom. Box lunches wiU 
be available for $6 on a first-come first-served basis. 
*•• 

The New York Annual Conference dinner will be held 
Monday, May 11 at 5:30 p.m. Contact Jane Allen 
Middleton or Ernest Swiggett, (A-6-1). 
•** 

Northern Covenant will meet Monday, May 11 after 
the last plenaiy session in room 203. Delegations from 
Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri areas wiU meet for 
fellowship and get-acquainted time. 
*** 

The Philadelphia Area will sponsor a dinner on 
Monday, May 11 at 5:45 p.m, Delta Restaurant, 434 
West Market Street. 

•** 

A Boston Area UMC dinner with Bishop and Mrs. F. 
Herbert Skeete is set for Monday, May 11 at 6 p.m. in 
the Cherokee-Shawnee Room at the Hyatt. $14 per 
person. Reservations needed A.SA.P. to Richard L. 
Evans. 

Tuesday, May 12 

Mississippi delegates and friends will meet for dinner 
on Tuesday, May 12, 6 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency. 
**• 

Louisville Area dinner with Bishop Spain will be held 
Tuesday, May 12, 6 p.m., Masterson's Restaurant, 
Cardinal Room. For reservations contact Ray Webster 
(A-18-5) by Monday, May 11 at 9 am. 
••* 

A forum of representatives from the United Methodist 



200 



May 9, 1992 



Church will discuss issues and take phone-in questions 
from listeners on the regionally known "Metz Here" 
radio talk show with host Mr. Milton Metz. The show 
will air live on WHAS-AM Radio, 840 at 10 p.m. 
••* 

The German delegation luncheon will be held 
Tuesday, May 12 at 12:45 p.m. in the Bristol Bar and 
Grille at the Kentucky Center for the Arts. 
*** 

Wisconsin Area delegates and friends are invited to a 
fdlowship dinner, Tuesday, May 12, 5:45 p.m. at 



Charley's Restaurant (comer of Main and 6th Streets). 
Reservations must be made with Phyllis Rodriguez 
(589-5200), room 1710 by noon on Monday, May 11. 

Thursday, May 14 

The Professional Association of United Methodist 
Church Secretaries luncheon will be held Thursday, 
May 14, 1 p.m. at The Old House Restaurant. Meet at 
the South Lobby exit of the convention center on the 
comer of Fourth and Jefferson at 12:45 p.m., $4 - $6. 



L.A. local churches respond 
to human needs following riots 

The latest figures emerging from assessments of the 
Los Angeles riots and fires indicate 40,000 jobs were 
lost — probably 10,000 permanently. 

Local churches are supplying food, clothing, emer- 
gency housing and transportation, coimseling, and 
other human-need resources for those displaced by last 
week's destruction. 

While initial reports indicated mostly Black and Ko- 
rean businesses and homes were affected, more recent 
accounts note 40 percent of the businesses burned and 
looted were Latino-owned. 

President Bush and his cabinet members visited the 
City of Angels, expressed "horror and dismay" at the 
destruction, and heard firsthand the stories of anger, 
fear, fi-ustration, and need fi-om the residents. 

The United Methodist Committee on Relief (UM- 
COR) has named the Advance Special for this crisis 
"L.A. Relief^ehabilitation Fund," #901735-2. Advance 
gifts will be forwarded to the California-Pacific Confer- 
ence and allocated to relief centers at a variety of 
churches including Faith, Holman, Korean-Central, 
Wilshire (Pico Union Hispanic Center), Vermont 
Square, and Wesley United Methodist churches in Los 
Angeles, and Enterprise United Methodist Church, 
Compton, in the Long Beach District. 

Donations may be made through any annual confer- 
ence treasurer or directly to UMCOR. 

For additional information, contact the Rev. Robert 
Smith, Los Angeles District superintendent, (213) 749- 
6310. Smith is a member of the California-Pacific Con- 
ference delegation. 

— Peg Parker 



PENTECOST WEEKEND 
OBSERVANCE 



The CouncU of Bishops of The United Method- 
ist Church calls upon United Methodist people 
everywhere to observe a special time of prayer, 
fasting, and sacrificial giving during Pentecost 
weekend, June 6-7, 1992. 

This weekend observance is to remind us of the 
tragic pain, violence, loss, and death that both 
preceded and followed the Rodney King verdict 
and to make us sensitive to the human needs and 
tensions that make violence and brutality all too 
common in oar communities all over the world. 
This we do because all Christians are called to be 
agents of justice and peace, reconciliation and re- 
building. 

Our offerings, identified by Advance Special 
#901735-2, will be channeled by annual confer- 
ence treasxu-ers through UMCOR for relief and re- 
habilitation in the Los Angeles community. In 
annual conferences where situations of violence 
have created similar needs, up to one-half of the 
offering may be retained for use there. 



M/S/C Council of Bishops 

5/8/92 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



201 



New System Speeds Legislative 
Process 

A complex network of computers and wires now re- 
places a series of typewriters, piles of paper, and over- 
worked runners. 

The net result is a speedier process, but slightly 
higher anxiety levels as committee officers and Daily 
Christian Advocate volunteer recorders settle into a 
new operating system. 

The design is the result of months of cooperative 
planning by the staffs of the secretary's office and the 
DCA. John Brawn, a senior auditor for Hewlett- 
Packard from California, and Mike Cunningham, the 
Director of Information Systems for The United Meth- 
odist Publishing House, put their heads together to 
hatch the scheme. Brawn says he tested the design 
with wires r unn ing from his bedroom through the liv- 
ing room to the kitchen. 

As might be expected, the plan was not without its 
setbacks. When Brawn arrived, he found that a tele- 
phone company that had earlier promised use of phone 
wires was no longer at the convention center. The end 
result was that Brawn, his father Mel Brawn, and DCA 
staffers Vem Denney and Glenn Hinton, along with 
volunteers Cannon Kinnard and Gere Reist crawled in, 
under, and between convention center floors to pull 
wires to each committee room. 

Cunningham shipped a total of 45 computers and 23 
printers from Nashville. Somewhat worried about com- 
puters on a trailer truck, he arranged for alternate 
transportation of 10 of the computers and eight print- 
ers. The staffs subsequently spent two days setting up 
equipment and training recorders and committee offi- 
cers in the intricacies of the plan. 

The system, designed by Brawn, is capable of track- 
ing automatically the membership of a committee, cal- 
culating the number of votes, finding the pages in the 
Advance Editions, appending petitions as submitted, 
and generally impressing users with whiz-bang possi- 
bilities at a speed-of-light pace. 

"One of the advantages of the system," said Brawn, 
"is that it guarantees that all petitions will be ad- 
dressed, and no petition can be considered more than 
once." Moreover, walkie-talkies allow recorders to re- 
ceive help from staffers of the DCA or the secretary's of- 
fice when they encounter expected computer glitches. 

Brawn said the program instructions for the system 
required seven notebooks of more than 1,000 typewrit- 
ten pages. 

It is hoped that the months and years of preparation 
will reduce the time it takes to process calendar items 
and increase the accvu-acy of the reports. One can hope 
that the results will compensate for increased anxiety 
levels. 



Petitions Response 

Here's the way legislative committee officials re- 
sponded to the initial use of the new petitions electronic 
tracking system: 

* Once we got the rhythm of the system through trial 
runs, we found it works excellently. We had a few bugs 
last night, but this morning it has done very well 

Bailey F. Watkins, secretary 
Local Church Committee 

* / think the new system is going to be very helpful I 
suspect we are saving a great deal of time. 

Susan D. Messenger, secretary 
Conferences Committee 

* / like it very much! I know the old system. This sys- 
tem has none of the old agonies.. .and few of the old woes. 

Mary Johnson, subcommittee secretary 
Conferences Committee 

* So far it's been great! The only problem we've had 
is the one we have right now. [session had just recessed 
when computer went down] / have a feeling we'll have 
this corrected shortly and have everything right on line 
soon! 

Glenn Hinton, Systems Analyst and Trainer 

United Methodist Publishing House, 

Recorder, 

Church and Society Committee 

* This system appears to be working very well I have 
never chaired a committee, but I have participated in 
their work. That's my basis for comparisoru 

Sandra L. Kelley Lackore 

Chair, 

Financial Administration Conmiittee 

* We lost just one petition, but I think it is working 
very well We haven't had any big problems. 

David L. Severe 

Secretary, 

General/Judicial Administration 



Richard Peck 



202 



May 9, 1992 



Legislative Status Report 



Central Conferences 



Conferences 



Church and Society 



Committee Items 



Caieiaar Items 




Jnassigned 
179 



Committee Items 



Committee Items 




Calendar Items 
15 Calendar Iteins 

Voted by GC 



/ \ //O Voted by GC 

\ j Unassigrted 






Discipleship 



Financial Administration 



Unassigned 
^ """"N^^^ ^° Calendar ftems 

^^^^L \ I Calendar ttems / 

^^^^^^^^^m Voted by I 

Committee Items ^^^^^^^^^T 

206'^^^^^ Committed 




Voted by GC 



Faith and Mission 



Unassigned 74^__^ 

> — ' -^^ Calendar Items 

^^^^^^^^H Voted by 

^ -TC 



Committee Items 



General/Judicial Administration Global Ministries Higher Education & Chaplaincy 



Committee items 




Calendar Items 
56 

Voted by GC 



Unassigned 

^^B \ /O Voted by GC 

^^^^^^^^^^■^ Calendar Items I 

Committee Items^^^^^^^^ Calendar Hems 




Committee Items 



■Unassigned 



Voted by GC 



Unassigned 153 



Independent Commissions 



Committee Items 
48 



Local Church 

Unassigned 



Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 



Calendar Items 




Unassigned 



Voted by GC 



Cominiltee ttems 



Data for 5/08/92 (10:00 PM) 




Calendar ttems 
39 



Voted by GC 



Unassigned 

/ \ /' Calendar Itenvs 

^^^H|^^^B^ Voted by 

Committee Items ^^^^^^ 
275' 



These charts picture the work done by each legislative committee. "Unassigned" shows the number of 
petitions that the committee has not yet addressed. "Committee Items" records the number of petitions 
being worked on somewhere in the committee. "Calendar Items" indicates the number of petitions voted 
on and released by the committee. "Voted by GC" shows the number of calendar items that have been 
voted on by the General Conference plenary. 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



203 



Legislative Committee Reports 



Church and Society 

The committee concurred with petitions that: 

* call for "serious systemic change" in the U.S. 
health care system, including comprehensive benefits 
to everyone, an "equitable and efficient" financing sys- 
tem, and cost-containment measiu-es; 

* declare The United Methodist Church's commit- 
ment to work in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic 
and urge education and action efforts by local church, 
annual conferences, general agencies, and bishops; 

* highlight the church's concern for mental health, 
noting the influence of dynamics such as violence, ra- 
cism, and substance abuse in causing mental stress; 
and encourage mental health education, individual ac- 
tions, and research and resources; 

* encourage doctors and medical institutions to in- 
form parents of newborn sons of the dangers and bene- 
fits of circumcision; 

* support education encouraging abstinence from il- 
legal drugs as well as alcohol (addition to SP 72.1); 

* call for a ban on television and radio advertising or 
alcoholic beverages; 

"" lift up the Oxford House model for substance abuse 
recovery; 

* update the church's resolutions on drug and alco- 
hol concerns by adding current information on crack, 
cocaine, and other substances; 

* call for stronger government action to reduce drug 
trafficking and to end covert government operations; 

* call on all levels of the church to engage in preven- 
tion, intervention, treatment, community organization, 
public advocacy, abstinence, and mission evangelism in 
confronting the drug crisis; 

* condemn any sexual or erotic contact between 
adults and children as abusive (SP 72. C); oppose genetic 
therapy that can be passed on to offspring; limit genetic 
therapy to the alleviation of suffering caused by dis- 
ease; and deem genetic data as confidential (SP 72.). 

— Suzanne Calvin, Lee Ranck (May 8, 1992, 5:10 p.m.) 

Conferences 

The conunittee concurred with the following consti- 
tutional petitions: 

* updating language from "ministerial" to "clergy" 
in pars. 23, 25, 35, 36; 

* retain the word "may" in par. 43. 

The committee voted to amend the Discipline, par. 
505 on bishops in jurisdictions and central conferences: 

1. Fulfilling the mission of the church shall be the 
basis in determining the number of bishops; 

2. The number remains the same unless changed by 
General Conference. Recommendation for change may 
be made by the Commission on Central Conference Af- 
fairs or each jurisdictional conference affected and in- 
terjurisdictional committee. Recommendations are not 
limited to these organizations. 



3. Effective immediately. 

It concurred on the following petitions: 

* Par. 627: journals of the jurisdictional conferences 
are no longer required to be printed by the UMPH; 

* Par. 628: representation from small churches on 
general and jurisdictional boards, include persons irom 
churches of small membership; 

* Par. 702: amended to make conference lay leader 
chair of Board of Laity or its equivalent, and delete 
702.8b; 

* Par. 745; there may be a committee on ministry to 
enlist persons with handicapping conditions in each an- 
nual conference to enlist responsibility in program and 
advocacy. 

The committee concurred to amend par. 701.1 to 
read: The clergy membership of an annual conference 
shall consist of members in full connection, probation- 
ary members, associate members, affiliate members, 
and all local pastors under full-time appointment to a 
pastoral charge. 

a. Remain as is. 

b. Change word "lay" to "clergy" before the word 
"delegates." 

c. Associate members shall have the right to vote in 
the annual conference on all matters except in the elec- 
tion of lay delegates to the General and jurisdictional 
or Central Conferences, and matters of ordination, 
character, and conference relations of clergy. 

d. All local pastors under full-time appointment to a 
pastoral charge shall have the right to vote in the an- 
nual conference on all matters except constitutional 
amendments, election of lay delegates to General and 
jurisdictional or Central conferences, and matters of or- 
dination, character, and conference relations of clergy. 

e. Delete from Discipline. 

f. Affiliate clergy members shall have the right to 
vote in the annual conference on all matters except con- 
stitutional amendments, election of delegates to the 
General and jurisdictional or Central conferences, and 
matters or ordination, character, and conference rela- 
tions of clergy. 

A minority report is expected. It will ask to restore 
part-time clergy membership to this paragraph with 
some voting limitations. 

*Correction to May 8 DCA: page 156, Conferences 
report: delete the words "probationary members" frY)m 
second item. 

— Dan Gangler, Jane Dennis (May 8, 5:p. tn.) 



Discipleship 

In regard to the proposed Book of Worship, the com- 
mittee: 

* found replacements for the words "submitting" 
and "oversee" in the services of consecration jmd ordi- 
nation (pp. 477, 487, 503, 506); 



204 



May 9, 1992 



* changed "Creator, Christ, and Holy Ghost" to "Fa- 
ther, Son, and Holy Spirit" in the services for commis- 
sioning missionaries and deaconnesses (pp. 552 and 
554); 

* voted 57-35 for non-concurrence with a petition 
asking that a "service of infant dedication" be included 
in the new Book of Worship (see petition no. DI-12171- 
3000-R, pp. 1127-28, Advance DCA, Vol. II); 

* approved with 1 dissenting vote in favor of the new 
Book of Worship as amended (a minority report will ask 
that the prayer beginning "0 Mother God" be restored 
to p. 363); 

* agreed that portions of the document "A Com- 
memoration of Native American Thanksgiving," devel- 
oped by Native Americans on site at General 
Conference, be incorporated in the section of the wor- 
ship book pertaining to Native American Awareness 
Sunday. 

— Garlinda Burton, Bettie Story May 8, 3: p.m.) 

Faith and Mission 

The committee concurred with a recommendation of 
the General Board of Discipleship to receive "By Water 
and the Spirit, A Study of the Proposed United Method- 
ist Understanding of Baptism" for church wide study in 
the next quadrennium. The committee will recommend 
that questions and concerns discussed in the legislative 
committee be incorporated in the study document itself. 

— Lynne DeMichele, Ann Whiting (May 8, 4:45 p.m.) 

Finance and Administration 

The committee concurred with a task force recom- 
mendation to move the General Board of Global Minis- 
tries (GBGM) out of New York City. The vote was 51^0 
with one abstention. Committee members opposing the 
action said they would submit a minority report recom- 
mending that the board stay in New York. 

The group heard presentations from Randolph Smith 
of Houston, chair of the Task Force to Study the Feasi- 
bility of Relocating the GBGM, and the Rev. Donald 
Messer of Denver, chair of the GBGM's own location 
committee, which opposes leaving New York. 

A minority report was also being drafted by mem- 
bers who oppose the committee recommendation to put 
a cap on the 1993-96 quadrennial general budget based 
on the 1992 budget level. The minority is asking that 
the budget be set at $472 million, or about 2% increase 
per year. 

In other action, the committee concurred with: 

* an emphasis on using equitable salary funds in an- 
nual conferences to fund entry-level pastors serving in 
teaching parishes or cooperative parishes; 

* a statement that limitations on salary supple- 
ments from the equitable salary fund would not result 
in denying the minimum salary to pastors who are 
serving appointments and are conference members in 
good standing; 



* a statement that participation in the church 
through service and gifts is "an expression of our love 
to God;" 

* a provision that the church's ban on expending 
funds on gay causes shall not limit the church's minis- 
try in response to the HIV epidemic. 

The committee concurred on several other petitions 
and voted nonconcurrence on 50. 

— Jean Lyles, Willie Teague (May 8, 5: p. m.) 

General and Judicial Administration 

The committee voted concvirrence with the following 
petitions: 

* report of the Advisory/Coordinating Committee on 
Older Adults that its proposed budget for the 1993-96 
quadrennium be $100,000 (GJ-10861-3000-A$); 

* recommendation of the Interagency Task Force on 
AIDS be continued for the 1993-96 quadrennium to 
keep the issue of AIDS before the general church in- 
cluding recommended funding of $20,000 to ensiu-e the 
participation of persons whose lives have been touched 
by mV/AIDS (GJ-10732-S$); 

* study of the report on strengthening small-mem- 
bership churches following an amendment recommend- 
ing local ecumenical involvements (GJ-10791-3000-S); 

* recommendation of the Task Force on Chapter VIII 
that an administrative and judicial procedures manual 
be created by the General Council on Finance and Ad- 
ministration in consultation with the General Board of 
Higher Education and Ministry and additional church 
legal resources (GJ-10691-3000-R$); 

* creation of an Ann a Howard Shaw Day and of an 
amendment that churches around the world "may" (in- 
stead of "shall") observe it as a day to remember the 
struggle of "women and men to be equal in every aspect 
of their common life" (GJ-10619-3000-R$); 

* setting May as Christian Family Month (GJ- 
10971-3000-R); 

* report on the use of biblical theological language 
and the recommendation that the study document 
Words That Hurt, Words That Heal- Language About 
God and People continue to be used (GJ-10886-3000-A). 

—Ralph Baker, Linda Green (May 8, 12:33p.m.) 

Global Ministries 

The committee concurred with petitions as amended: 

* implementing a National Plan for Hispanic Minis- 
try, with funding of $3.1 million taken from the general 
fund; 

* approving a Native American Comprehensive Plan 
at a cost of $1.2 million, with funding coming from new 
monies, as determined by the General Council on Fi- 
nance and Administration; and six other petitions on 
Native American concerns. 

Referred: 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



205 



* seven petitions regarding Native Americans to 
Higher Education, Discipleship, and Church and Soci- 
ety committees. 

The committee also concurred with petitions affirm- 
ing basic niral worth, tent building ministries, church 
and community workers (which urged increased sup- 
port but did not specify numbers), and resourcing Black 
churches in urban communities. 

— Linda Bloom and Betty Thompaon (May 8, 4:40p.m.) 

Higher Education and Chaplaincy 

The committee concurred with petitions that are: 

* calling for the Division of Higher Education to 
maintain its role in approving institutional sponsorship 
and relationships and to provide a structure to relate 
college and university students of UMC to a national 
United Methodist student organization and appropriate 
ecumenical student organizations; 

* calling for the GBHEM to promote awareness of 
and concurrence with Policies Relative to Socially Re- 
sponsible Investments (par. 816), the Social Principles 
(pars. 70-76), and The Book of Resolutions; 

* calling for Central Conference members of the GB- 
HEM to be elected by the Commission on Central Con- 
ference Affairs rather than by the Council of Bishops; 

Voted non-concurrence with: 

* an amended petition encoxiraging UM seminaries 
to maintain or establish a chair of Town and Country 
Ministry (Vote on non-concurrence: 48-Yes, 19-No, 4- 
Abstaining); 

Further clarification on previously reported item: A 
petition with which the committee concurred on Thurs- 
day would change the current title of the Executive Di- 
rector of the Black College Fund to the Associate 
General Secretary for the Black College Fund. The peti- 
tion would not add a staff position to the GBHEM or re- 
quire additional funding. 

(This completes the conmiittee's work, unless addi- 
tional items are referred for its consideration.) 

— Karen Tiainger, Al Horton (May 8, 11:50 a.m.) 

Independent Commissions 

The committee voted concurrence on the following 
matters: 

* designating three additional shrines and one land- 
mark; 

* GCRR study on Racism in Rural Areas (amended 
membership and rationale for committee); 

* continuation of the General Commission on Relig- 
ion and Race; 

* expanded the purpose of the General Commission 
on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns; 

* adding responsibilities to the duties of the General 
Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Con- 
cerns; 

* request a relationship between GCUIC and GBCS; 



* a request from the Council of Bishops to establish 
covenant relationships with eight other chiurches; 

* changing the representation of bishops to the 
GCUIC to include one from the Central Conferences; 

* adding permissive language to the make-up of the 
GCOSROW to maintain balanced representation; 

* added to the responsibility of GCOSROW the assis- 
tance in the eradication of sexual harassment; 

* celebration and affirmation of the work of GCRR 
with amendment; 

* recognized "Pacific Islanders" as a recognized eth- 
nic group; 

* added language to assist in balancing repre- 
sentation on the Conference Commission on Religion 
and Race. 

Voted non-concurrence on the following matters: 

* deletion of the Commission on the Status and Role 
of Women from all levels of the church; 

* requesting UMCOM to send all proposals to Gen- 
eral Conference to all local churches at least 90 days 
prior to the opening of General Conference; 

* requesting elimination of the General Commission 
on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns; 

* transferring the duties of the General Commission 
on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns to the 
General Board of Global Ministries. 

Sub-committee chairs are: W. Jing Chow — Commu- 
nications and Other Matters; Beverly S/iamana— Status 
and Role of Women; Hector Navas — Religion and Race; 
Maxine Allen — Archives and History; Patricia 
Toschak — Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. 

Kristin K Knudaon (May 8, 4:10p.m.) 

Local Church 

Corrections 

A petition specifying that the local church trustees 
annually review property, liability, malpractice, and 
crime insurance coverage was reported as "concur- 
rence." It should have been marked as "tabled." 

A petition marked as "concurrence" dealing with 
mergers should have said that the Church Local Con- 
ference of the church rather than "each" must approve. 

The committee voted concurrence to petitions: 

* adding study of "science and technology" to areas 
of concern for the church school; 

* specifying structure for "class meetings"; 

* enlisting persons for ordained and diaconal minis- 
try and missionary service to duties of the Pastor-Par- 
ish Relations Committee; 

* removing age or disability requirement from 
authorization for honorary members of Administrative 
Council/Board. 

The committee conciurred with amendment petitions 
that: 

* relate duties of Health and Welfare Ministries 
Representative, expressed the need for the church to be 
"programmatically" accessible; 

* include scouting ministry as a setting for youth 
ministry; 



206 



May 9, 1992 



* establish prison ministry; 

* specify only one immediate family member resid- 
ing in the same household can serve on the Committee 
on Pastor-Parish Relations; 

* state that pastor shall be present at all meetings of 
the Pastor-Parish Relations Committee except when 
pastor voluntarily excuses himself/herself; 

* authorize a plan of organization other than Admin- 
istrative Council or Administrative Board, when in 
harmony with the Discipline; 

* allow local church offices and chairpersonships to 
be held by more than one person, except for trustees, of- 
ficers of trustees, treasurer, lay member of Annual Con- 
ference, and members and chairperson of Committee on 
Pastor-Parish Relations. 

The committee voted non-concurrence with a peti- 
tion that would have deleted the pastor as chair of 
Nominations and Personnel; the non-concurrence would 
leave pastor as chair. A minority report has been an- 
nounced, which would allow the Committee on Nomina- 
tions and Personnel to elect a chair from among 
continuing members but would make the pastor eligi- 
ble for such election. 

The committee moved to reconsider a petition deal- 
ing with shared facilities, and added a provision that 
the district director of Religion and Race be involved in 
decisions. 

— Kathy Kruger Noble, Ray ford Woodrick (May 8, 4:10 p.m.) 

Ordained and Diaconal Ministry 

The committee voted concurrence with petitions that 
would: 

* update constitutional language by substituting the 
word "clergy" for "ministerial"; 

* add a new par. 52 on episcopal supervision, saying 
bishops would be appointed to their areas by an Interju- 
risdictional Committee on the Episcopacy, giving the 
Council of Bishops authority to assign bishops for presi- 
dential or other temporary service in any annual con- 
ference, and providing in an emergency situation for 
the appointment of a bishop from one jurisdiction or 
central conference to the work of another; 

* make easier the transfer of bishops across jurisdic- 
tional lines; 

* outline the duties of the jurisdictional committees 
on ordained ministries (petition was amended by the 
committee to change the word "may" to "shall" in the 
final sentence of the proposed addition); 

* give vote to, as amended to read, "at least two, but 
not more than six" laypersons who participate in the 
work of each annual conference board of ordained min- 
istry, except on matters prohibited by the constitution, 
and provide orientation for new members. 

The committee voted non-concurrence with petitions 
that would: 

* limit bishops' terms to eight years out of any 12 
consecutive years; 



* provide for a committee of ordained annual confer- 
ence members appointed by a nominations committee 
to consult with bishops on ministerial appointments. 

The committee voted to table action on a petition to 
amend par. 302 on the nature of diaconal ministry. A 
statement was drafted, outlining a working definition 
of diaconal ministers/deacons for use in dealing with 
other related petitions. A straw vote of 53-30, with 2 ab- 
stentions, indicated acceptance of the statement. The 
definition acknowledges the understanding of the term 
"deacon" as reflecting duties presently lodged with di- 
aconal ministers and says ordained deacons are non- 
itinerating members of clergy who do not celebrate the 
sacraments, conduct weddings or funerals, and who 
shall not automatically be considered probationary 
members of the annual conference. 

—Nancye Willie (May 8, 3:30p.m.) 



Bring Christ to the 
world through the 
World Service Fund, 
your commitment 
to mission. 





Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



207 



Additional Petitions 



1171 . Pstnion NumlMr FM-1 1268-0071-0; Rm. and Mr*. Arthur L Manture, Dnart 

Southwnt Conf»r»nc«. 

Marriage a Shared Fidelity Between a Man 
and a Woman. 

Retain 1I71C. 



1171 . Patltlon Number CS-124O4-O071-D;AdmlnlstratK« Council, Central UMC, 

Laurinburg, NC. 

Include The Durham Declaration in 
Paragraph 71. 

Include the Durhcim Declaration in 1171. 



|T75 PetHlon Number CS-0000-75-D; Alan Geyer and Philip Wogaman, NJ and 

BLT. 

War and Peace 

Amend 1174 G) and 75 C) by substitution: 

f 75C) War and Peace- The Christian church has al- 
ways deplored the reality of war, with its violence, coer- 
cion, destructiveness, and inhumanities. We believe that 
all nations are morally obligated to seek peaceful resolu- 
tion of all conflicts that may arise between or among 
them. Some Christians have concluded that all violence 
is inherently incompatible with the Gospel and spirit of 
Christ. Their pacifist witness has ever reminded the 
Church that it can never allow war to be taken lightly or 
pursued self-righteously. Other Christians, also recog- 
nizing the evil of war, nevertheless believe that oc- 
casions can arise in a sinful and unjust world where an 
unjust peace can be less compatible with the Gospel and 
spirit of Christ than a measured use of force to restrain 
injustice. We recognize the authenticity of both forms of 
Christian witness. Those who accept the limited jus- 
tification for war must avoid romanticizing its means or 
its ends. They must insist that the conduct of war, when 
believed necessary, must be governed by the most strin- 
gent humanitarian principles of justice and internation- 
al law. 

All Christians must resist the militarization of 
society and of all its institutions. The manufacture, sale, 
and deployment of armaments must be reduced and 
controlled. We oppose the production, possession or use 
of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruc- 
tion. 

We pray for grace and wisdom to organize human 
society at every level in such a way that recourse to 
violence yields to civilized community life. We seek the 
strengthening of international law and institutions that 
will increasing delegitimize war and provide cooperative 



capacities for crisis intervention, peace-keeping, and 
peacemaking. 



11247. 



Petition Number LC-124390247-D: Gainesville District Council on 
Ministries, NGA, Gainesville, GA. 



The Church Historian. 

Amend 1247.5 (a): 

The Charge Conference shall elect a church his- 
torian...The church historian shall be a member of the 
Administrative Council or Administrative Board. The 
church historian may be a consultant to the coordinator 
of communications in video productions of the heritage 
of the congregation. The church historian may also hold 
another elected position on the council or board. 



1252. 



Petition Number LC-1 2440-0252-D; Gainesville District Council on 

Ministries, Gainesville, GA. 



Chairperson of Outreach. 

Amend 11252.1 (c): 

The work area on evangelism. . . The work area 
will also develop programs, including videotapes of evan- 
gelistic efforts in cooperation with the coordinator of 
communications to aid the spiritual growth of those new 
persons. 



11257. Petition Number LC-1 244 1-0257-D; Gainesville District Council on 
Ministries, NGA. Gainesville, GA. 

Council on Ministries 

Amend 1257: 

. . . Where the committees, councils, task groups, 
commissions, etc., are not organized, the duties assigned 
to each, including production of video and other resour- 
ces, become the responsibility of the Council on Mini- 
stries, or its successor. 



11260. Petition Number 10-12442-0260-0; Gainesville District Council on 
Ministries, NGA, Gainesville, GA. 

Work Area Chairperson. 

Amend 1260: 

Each work area chairperson, with the guidance of the 
pastor . . . shall serve as liaison within and beyond 
the local church. The work area chairperson may 
develop video resources in cooperation with the coor- 
dinator of communications. When an activity in the area 



208 



May 9, 1992 



of work is planned by the Council on Ministries or Ad- 
ministrative Council... 



^264 Pelilion Number LC-12453-264-D; Halter Lake UMC James L Chapman, 

Chair of Administrative Board; Paul M. McCutcheon, Pastor Haller l.al<e UMC 
Seattle, WA(addKion) 

The Organizational Structure 
of the Local Church 

Amend 11264: 

Each church or charge shaU should have an organized 
unit of United Methodist Men . . .". 



^1906- Petition Number IC-1243S-1906-D; Gainesville District Council on Ministries, 
NGA, Gainesville. GA. 

Duties of UM Communications. 

Amend 51906.9: 

It shall provide guidance, resources, and training for 
the local church coordinator of communications and 
local church video production, provided that training at 
the local level shall be through and in cooperation with 
Annual Conferences. 



1[749. Petrtion Number. CO- 12261-0749-0; Gilbert Rhoades, Jr. and 24 Other 
Individuals, Bells UMC, Clinton, MO. 

The District Scouting Coordinator 

Add sew sub 1 after 1I749.4Q: 

The District Scouting Coordinator will work with the 
District Council on Ministries and the Conference 
Scouting Coordinator to promote and encourage the 
use of outreach ministry programs of community youth- 
serving agencies at the local church level. 



1181 0. Petition Number GJ-1 1965-0810-0; Leonard 0. Slutz, Hyde Pan< 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

Maximum Period of Membership 

on a General Agency 

to Three Consecutive Terms. ^ 

Amend 11810.3: 

Amend 11810.3 so that the maximum period of mem- 
bership on a general agency will be three rather than two 
consecutive terms. 



m 005. Petition Number GJ-1 1 966- 1005-D; Leonard D. Slutz, Hyde Park 
Community UMC, Cincinnati, OH. 

Study Composition and Number of 
Members of Governing Boards of Program 
and Other Agencies. 

Amend 111005.3 and 111005.4: 

Authorize and direct the General Council on Mini- 
stries pursuant to 1005.3 and 11005.4 to study the com- 
position and number of members of the governing 
boards of the program agencies and other general agen- 
cies of the Church and report to the 1996 General Con- 
ference. 



Resolutions 



Petition Number FA-12451-3000-R; James and Dorothy O'Quinn, 
Presidents, United Methodist Clergy Couples (new) 

Special Arrangement Polices 

of Comprehensive Protection Plan 

Mandate the General Board of Pensions annually 
study the special arrangements poUcies for participation 
in the Comprehensive Protection Plan, chosen by each 
Annual Conference, and that such a study be published 
by the General Council on Finance and Administration 
and in the General Minutes. 

Petition Number LC-12437-3000-M; MNN. 

Special Attention 

of the Different Groups of People. 

1) All places in the Book of Discipline where wording 
such as the following is used. Special attention shall bo 
given to the incluoion of... different age and ethnic grou p- 
ifigs shall be rewritten to say. Membership shall include, 
wherever possible.. .(the different groups of people). 

2) Whereas sign language is the primary means of 
communication for many people who are deaf; amend 
paragraph 262.3.b. ... including devices and interpreters 



Petition Number CS-10049-3000-R; SNE. 

National Health Care Plan. 

Whereas, The General Conference of The United . 
Methodist Church affumed the Fmdings of the 
President's Committee of Medical Ethics of 1983 in 
which measures which exacerbate existing inadequacies 
in health care costs are called "morally unacceptable" 
(B.O.R. 1988, p.241); 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



209 



Whereas, approximately 37 million Americans, includ- 
ing 12 million children, have no health insurance 
coverage, another 60 million underinsured Americans 
are vulnerable to catastrophic health care costs, 25 per- 
cent of those who are uninsured are ineUgible for health 
insurance due to pre-existing health conditions and the 
numbers of uninsured and underinsured have risen 
dramatically during the past decade (Consumer Re- 
search, Sept. 1989); 

Therefore, be it resolved that: 

1. General Conference request that The United 
Methodist Church promote a program of national health 
care delivery which reflects the Social Principles of the 
Church and assures equaUty and concern for every per- 
son regardless of their ability to pay or otherwise qualify: 

2. Direct the Conference Council of Ministries to as- 
sign the development of a strategy of education among 
local churches within the connection which would ex- 
amine the underlying inflationary causes of escalating 
health care costs, including perverse incentives for hospi- 
tals and other care-givers to increase costs and the ab- 
sence of disincentives for consumers to reduce demand 
for unnecessary care: 

3. Urge all levels of The United Methodist Church to 
involve every level of government in the development of 
National Health Care. 



Pelrtion Number CO-10963-3000-R: NIN, NIL 

Editorial Changes in the Discipline 

In all places where wording such as the following is 
used, Special attention shall be g i ven to the ineluaioB 
of.. .(diffe r ent age and ethnic groupings). Membership 
shall include, whenever possible. . . (the difTerent 
groupings). 



Petition Number FA-11608-3000-R: Lorraine B. Burt, Fiist UMC, Olympia, 
WA. 



Section 3— Participation (Page 5) 3.3 Beneficiary 
Designation 

Middle of paragraph: "In the event that a Participant 
shall not designate a Beneficiary in the manner 
heretofore stated,... 

Insert/change Number 1 "The surviving spouse 
and/or former surviving spouse of a deceased Par- 
ticipant in accordance to the period of time served when 
Participant accrued Participant's interest in the Plan." 



Pelilion Number FM-12454-3000-R; LRK Richa/d B. WilKe, Bishop Wm. 
Christopher Cooper, Little Rocl< Conference Secretary(new) 

No Task Force or Study Group on 
Homosexuality for the Next Quadrennium 

Retain 171F, and also recommend that create and 
fund no new task force or study group on this issue. 



Petition Number FM-12455-3000-fl; Pastors of the Central Pennsylvania 
Annual Conference (new) 

Retain the Present Wording of the Social 
Principles, Retain Present Stance 
Against Ordination 

Retain 1171F.5 and 11402.2 



Petition Number FM-1Z456-3000-R; ChaHes E. Weigel Jr., EPA Conference 
Secretary (new) 

Retain the Statement that the Church 
Views Homosexuality as "Incompatible 
with Christian Teaching". 

Reject any changes in 171F that would seek to remove 
the statement that views the practice of homosexuality 
as "incompatible with Christian teaching". 



Ministerial Pension Plan. 

Regarding the Retirement Equity Act of 1984, Plan 
Document-Ministerial Pension Plan. 

Section lO-Miscellaneous (Page 19) 10.6 Marital 
Litigation 

"In the event a Participant or Retired Participant is a 
party to marital litigation. . . 

Insert after Number 3: 

Number (4) the payments shall be mandatory and 
pro-rated to former spouse (and surviving spouse) in ac- 
cordance to the period of time each spouse served (was 
married) with Participant when Participant accrued the 
Pension Benefits. 



Petition Number FM-12457-3000-R; KEN Ronald V. Young, Conference 
Secretary (new) 

Christian Living and the Church 

Retain 1I71F 



Petition Number: FM-12458-30CX)-R; Robert L Hemmerla. Secretary Missouri 
East Annual Conference 

Retain Paragraph 71F on Homosexuality 

Retain position on homosexuality. 



210 



May 9, 1992 



Petition Number FM-12459-3000-R; Gaiy T. Ward, Conference Secretary; 
NAL 

Retain 7 IF on Homosexuality 

Retain our church's present position on 
homosexuality as set out in par. 71F and other para- 
graphs of the Discipline. 



Petition Number FM-11084-3000-R; Members of Central PA Conference, 
Harrisburg, PA. 

Support Present Statement 
Regarding Baptism and Membership. 

Whereas, the General Conference Baptism Study 
Committee has recommended specific disciplinary chan- 
ges in baptism and membership polity including: 



1) adding all baptized persons to full membership 
status regardless of ages or level of participation; 

2) eliminating the historic option of infant dedication; 

3) replacing Confirmation with "Profession of Baptis- 
mal Faith" and; 

4) eliminating the need for personal conversion and 
profession of faith as prerequisites for church member- 
ship; 

Therefore be it resolved, that we affirm, retain, and 
maintain the present disciplinary statements and historic 
church rites and rituals pertaining to baptism and mem- 
bership, and; 

Therefore be it resolved, that we go on record as op- 
posing the recommendations of the General Conference 
Baptism Study Committee. 



o: 



Petitions Referred 



FROM PET.# PARA.# 



TO PET.# PAR.# 



FROM PET.# PARA.# 



TO PET.# PAR.# 



CO 


10511 


0701D 


MN 


10511 


0701D 


GJ 


11447 


0451D 


MN 


11447 


0451D 


CO 


11241 


0506D 


CO 


11241 


0506D 


GJ 


11997 


0451D 


MN 


11997 


0451D 


CO 


11285 


3000R 


CO 


11285 


3000R 


GM 


11407 


3000R$ 


HE 


11407 


3000R5 


CO 


11595 


0507D 


CO 


11595 


0507D 


GM 


11487 


3000R 


HE 


11487 


3000R 


CO 


11641 


0704D 


CO 


11641 


0704D 


GM 


11718 


3000R 


HE 


11718 


3000R 


CO 


12020 


0610D 


CO 


12020 


0610D 


GM 


12144 


3000R 


CS 


12144 


3000R 


CO 


12058 


0506D 


CO 


12058 


0506D 


GM 


12145 


3000R 


HE 


12145 


3000R 


CO 


12196 


0608D 


CO 


12196 


0608D 


GM 


12146 


3000R$ 


DI 


12146 


3000R5 


cs 


10285 


3000R 


FM 


10285 


3000R 


GM 


12147 


3000R 


CS 


12147 


3000R 


cs 


11041 


3000R 


IC 


11041 


3000R 


GM 


12148 


3000R$ 


MN 


12148 


3000R5 


cs 


11063 


3000M$ 


GM 


11063 


3000M$ 


GM 


12151 


3000R 


IC 


12151 


3000R 


cs 


11512 


3000R 


GM 


11512 


3000R 


GM 


12154 


3000R 


GM 


12154 


3000R 


cs 


12460 


0075D 


CS 


12460 


0075D 


GM 


12226 


3000R 


CS 


12226 


3000R 


FA 


10968 


3000R 


CS 


10968 


3000R 


IC 


11754 


0653D 


CO 


11754 


0653D 


FA 


10969 


3000R 


GM 


10969 


3000R 


LC 


10070 


0247D 


FA 


10070 


0247D 


FA 


11039 


3000R$ 


FA 


11039 


3000R$ 


LC 


12453 


0264D 


LC 


12453 


0264D 


FA 


12236 


0726D 




INVALID 


MN 


10626 


3000R 


CS 


10626 


3000R 


FM 


12333 


3000R 


MN 


12333 


3000R 


MN 


11697 


3000R 


CS 


11697 


3000R 


GJ 


10168 


0448D 


MN 


10168 


0448D 


MN 


11751 


3000R 


GM 


11751 


3000R 


GJ 


10660 


0422D 


GJ 


10660 


0422D 


MN 


11790 


3000R 




INVALID 


GJ 


10834 


0822D 


GJ 


10834 


0822D 


MN 


11888 


040 ID 




INVALID 


GJ 


10911 


0814D 


FA 


10911 


0814D 


MN 


11238 


0527D 


GJ 


12238 


0527D 


GJ 


10951 


0814D 


GJ 


10951 


0814D 


MN 


12251 


3000M 


GJ 


12251 


3000M 



i 



Daily Edition Vol. 4 No. 5 



211 



Judicial Council Nominees 



Council of Bishops Nominees 



1. Joyce Alford 


NC 


2. Wesley Bailey 


SE 


3. Evelynn S. Caterson 


NE 


4. James M. DoUiver 


W(retire after 4 years) 


5. WiUard H.Douglas Jr. 


SE 


6. ClenzoFox 


NC 


7. Susan Henry-Cmwe 


SE 


8. Zan W.Holmes Jr. 


SC 


9. James Kambor (Liberia) 


CC 


10. Don Lefeler 


NC 


11. Crisolito Pascual 


CC 


12. Theophil Schaad (SwitzerlandX:C 


13. Robert Sweet 


NE 


14. Glenda C. nomas 


W 


15. Richard Wright 


NE 



Plenary Session Nominees 



Jurisdiction 


1. Edward H. HUl 


SC 


2. David C. Crago 


NC 


3. Jacob C. Martinson 


SE 


4. David Ballantyne Quee 




(Sierra Leone) 


CC 


S.Theodore H. Walter 


SE 



Council of Bishops Nominees 

Joyce L. Alford (clergy) 

Rev. Joyce L. Alford currently serves as district super- 
intendent in the Wisconsin Annual Conference. Previous 
service included pastorates in 2 Wisconsin congrega- 
tions. Current and past service in the annual conference 
has included: Conference Board of Ordained Ministry, 
Rules Committee, Episcopacy Committee, Joint Commit- 
tee on Disability, the Ethnic Minority Local Church 
Development Committee, and Board of Global Ministry. 
A second-career person, she was Corporate Vice-Presi- 
dent of Methodist Health Services of Madison, and 
Director of Nursing. Educational background: M.Div., 
Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary; M.S. in Nurs- 
ing. Awards and recognition: Georgia Harkness Scholar- 
ships, Myrtle Speer Award, Quentin Nolte Award for 
Promise in Parish Ministry. 



Wesley Bailey (laity) 

Wesley Bailey is a senior partner of a law firm and a 
member of the Western North Carolina Conference. He 
has been a General Conference delegate from 1972 
through 1988. He has been the chair of the delegation, 
the Legislative Committee on Discipleship, and the 1988 
Jurisdictional Committee on Nominations; he also has 
been a member of the Jurisdictional Committee on Epis- 
copacy (3 quadrennia). Conference Program and 
Nomination Committee, Conference Lay Leader, and lay 
representative to Conference Board on Ordained Minis- 
try. He served as a UM representative to North Carolina 
Council of Churches; and he was elected as the first lay 
alternate to Judicial Council in 1988. Wesley is married 
to Joanna Bailey, and father of 2 children. 



Evelynn "Lynn" S. Caterson (laity) 

Lynn Caterson is an practicing attorney and member 
of the Absecon City Council in New Jersey. She has been 
a municipal court judge, a labor relations/legislative 
review specialist, and an Atlantic County assistant 
prosecutor. She is a member of the Absecon UMC in 
the Southern New Jersey Conference where she serves as 
a lay member to the Board of Ordained Ministry, chair 
of the District Superintendency Committee, and chair of 
the Conference COSROW. She is a delegate to the 
Northeast Jurisdictional Conference and a member of its 
executive and program review committees. She is a 
former chair and vice chair of the Conference Board of 
Church and Society. Her educational background in- 
cludes a J.D. from Rutgers University's School of Law, 
magna cum laude. 



James M. Dolliver (laity) » 

James Dolliver is a Washington state supreme court 
justice. He and wife Barbara live in Olympia, Wash., and 
are parents of 6 children. He was elected to Judicial 
Council in 1984. He is a member of the First United 
Methodist Church in Olympia of the Pacific Northwest 
Conference. He has been a delegate to 4 General Con- 
ferences, and in 1980 he chaired the legislative commit- 
tee on Church and Society. He was a member of the 
General Council on Ministries, 1972-1976; General 
Board of Church and Society, 1976-1984; and a 1983 
delegate to the British Methodist Conference. He is ac- 
tive in numerous civic and charitable organizations, and 
is an associate trustee of Claremont Theological Semi- 
nary and a trustee of the University of Puget Sound. 



212 



May 9, 1992 



Willard Henry Douglas, Jr. (laity) 

Willard Douglas, who was elected to the Judicial 
Council in 1984, is a retired judge of the Juvenile and 
Domestic Relations Court in Richmond, Va. He has 
been a delegate to 4 General and jurisdictional conferen- 
ces from 1972-1984. He also has been a delegate to the 
World Methodist Conference, a member of the General 
Commission on ReUgion and Race, Interagency Coor- 
dinating Committee of the General Council on Mini- 
stries. As a member of the Virginia Conference he serves 
on the rules committee and the Housing Development 
Corporation; and earUer he served as the associate con- 
ference lay leader and district lay leader. He has been a 
trustee at Ferrum College and presently serves on the 
board of Virginia Wesleyan College. He is a law 
graduate of Howard University. 



Clenzo B. Fox (laity) 

Clenzo Fox is the associate legal counsel for the City 
of Columbus, Ohio. He is the chair of the administrative 
board of the Hilltop United Methodist Church in the 
West Ohio Conference. He also has been a member of 
the General Commission on Religion and Race. He is a 
former president of the Robert B. Elliot Law Club, an as- 
sistant Ohio attorney general, examiner/referee for the 
Industrial Commission of Ohio, special counsel to the 
City of Columbus for Model City Affairs, and field ex- 
aminer in the Division of Taxation for the State of Ohio. 
He is a graduate of the Franklin Law School and Capital 
University. He was engaged in a general law practice 
from 1959 to 1973. He and his wife, Bernadine Fleming 
Fox, have 6 children. 



Susan Henry-Crowe (clergy) 

Susan Henry-Crowe is the chaplain at Emory Univer- 
sity and a member of the South Carolina Conference. 
She was a delegate to the General Conference in 1980 
and 1984, and a reserve delegate in 1988. She is a mem- 
ber of the General Church Coordinating Committee on 
Ethnic Minority Local Church and served on the 
General Commission on Communications for 8 years. 
From 1985 to 1991 she was the director and associate of 
the South Carohna Conference Council on Ministries. 
She has served on the Conference Board of Ordained 
Ministries (vice chair), the Joint Review Committee, the 
Council on Finance and Administration, as well as the 
Board of Trustees of Claflin College. She was ordained 
in 1977 and served as a local church pastor for 9 years. 



Zan Wesley Holmes, Jr. (clergy) 
Zan Hohnes has been the pastor of St. Luke "Com- 
munity" United Methodist Church in the North Texas 



Conference since 1974. He is also an associate professor 
of preaching at Perkins School of Theology. He was the 
pastor of Hamilton Park UMC in Dallas from 1958 to /* 
1968 and a district superintendent from 1968 to 1974. ■ 

Among his civic responsibiUties have been: a member of 
the Texas State Legislature, the Texas Constitutional 
Revision Commission, and the Board of Regents for the 
University of Texas system. He has been a delegate to 
General Conference in every quadrennium since 1972. 
He is a graduate of Huston-TUlotson College and 
Perkins School of Theology (M. Div. and STM). He also 
was awarded an honorary degree from Huston-Tillotson. 



James Kambor (clergy) 

James Kambor is pastor of S. Trowen Nagbe UMC, 
one of the largest and fastest-growing churches in the 
Liberia Armual Conference. Before this appointment, 
he served both as pastor of Doe Juah UMC and ad- 
ministrative assistant to the bishop. Kambor attended the 
College of West Africa, then received a scholarship to 
Our Lady of Fatima College. He ser\'ed as principal of 
J.S. Pout School, and following study at Peabody College 
in Nashville, Tenn., on a Crusade Scholarship, returned 
to his homeland to become supervisor of UM schools. In 
1983 he was approved by the Board of Ordained Minis- 
try of the Liberia Annual Conference to study for the 
ministry and rece